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Oh, good. You found it == the link didn't work right for me.

The site uses frames, so it messes with your ability to directly link to subpages on the site.

In Internet Explorer you can usually get around this. Right click in the frame you want to send people to. Select "properties". A window will come up the the page address. You can copy and paste from there. Point to the beginning of the address with your mouse, hold down the left keey and drag to highlight the entire address, right click and select copy. Even if all the address doesn't show just drag the mouse from the top and it will scroll to the end of the address.
http://www.suesternberg.com/04breed.html
A battle is brewing in our shelter about Sue Sternberg's temperament testing.

And why the battle? Who is winning? Lots of people jumping on the anti-sue bandwagon all of a sudden.( She's actually getting death threats, which seems pretty much like the anti-abortion folks that justify killing even though they don't want killing - IOW, clear thinkers.)
I guess they want us to go back to just adopting any dog to any owner and hope for the best, hope no kidsneed to get mutiple stitches or plastic surgery.
IOW, clear thinkers.) =A0=A0I guess they want us to go back to just adopting any dog to any owner and ... get mutiple stitches or plastic surgery.Now, Tricia. The false dilemma isn't the best example of clear thinking you might offer.

Some at our shelter don't believe SS's (unfortunate initials) methods are predictive of an animal's behavior in the home environment. Because we have the luxury (as many shelters don't) of time and resources, we don't need to make instant decisions. Others believe we are in danger of becoming a sanctuary for unadoptable dogs.
IOW, clear thinkers.) =A0=A0I guess they want us to go ... hope no kidsneed to get mutiple stitches or plastic surgery.

Now, Tricia. The false dilemma isn't the best example of clear thinking you might offer. Some at our shelter don't believe SS's (unfortunate initials) methods are predictive of an animal's behavior in the home environment.

You know she came from here, and I was not a fan of hers way back when.
Because we have the luxury (as many shelters don't) of time and resources, we don't need to make instant decisions.

That is a good thing.
I am always in awe that that is true though.
I know I found out a long time ago no matter how much moeny, time,space you have, there is never enough and always too many dogs.
Others believe we are in danger of becoming a sanctuary for unadoptable dogs.

How many dogs do you have at the shelter? How many can you have? Indoor outdoor runs?
Heated? Air conditioned?
How many adoptions a year?
How m uch do you spend on average for each dog that comes to the shelter?

How much is the adoption fee?
Paulette~
A battle is brewing in our shelter about Sue Sternberg's temperament testing.

And why the battle?

Because Ms. Sternberg admits that 75% of all dogs will fail this test.
Who is winning?

Not the dogs, it seems.
I guess they want us to go back to just adopting any dog to any owner and hope for the best, hope no kidsneed to get mutiple stitches or plastic surgery.

When I adopt an ACD, I want an ACD not a gormless, driveless, semi-ambulatory Gund in an ACD suit. I want a dog that is aloof/suspicious of strangers, who is assertive and manipulative and demanding. I want a "one-man" dog, one that is very rank- and space-conscious, one that will be protective of me and mine, a dog with a hearty prey drive. Those qualities do not play well on the Assess-A-Pet evaluation.
By lumping all potential adopters into the "clueless newbie" category, and selecting only dogs that are practially idiot-proof (because it is assumed that the adoptive family will be a bunch of dog-ignorant idiots), perfectly good dogs with perfectly appropriate temperaments for their breed are deemed "unadoptable". They ain't.

Horses for courses, and evaluating all dogs to a single standard while holding the humans to no particular standard isn't in the best interest of the dogs or the humans.
If the evaluation is used to better match a dog with a new family, that's one thing. If it's used to decide which 25% of all incoming shelter dogs are given an opportunity to be adopted, that's quite another.
Mary H. and the Ames National Zoo: Regis, Sam-I-Am, Noah (1992-2001), Ranger, Duke,
felines, and finches