Greetings group,
My concerns about Nikki's
socialization with other dogs were laid
to rest, so to speak, this evening. We
got a visit from my ex tonight, she came
over to visit my son (I have custody)
and brought along a 5 year old male
Pomeranian (sp?) that she has been
watching for a friend. Right away I
thought that I was going to have to keep
an eye on Nikki but, to my amazement,
they got along great. The Pom (can't
remember his name) was pretty calm and
quiet, just like Nikki normally is and
after the obligatory meet and sniff,
they were trotting around the house,
playing together. I was amazed Emotion: smile
Nikki even shared her toys with him!
I was so happy and I made sure that
I praised both of them for playing so
nice. They played together for about a
half hour until they got tired, got a
drink (Nikki even let him drink from her
bowl) and then laid down on Nikki's
favorite rug together. The Pom only
barked a couple of times when it was
time to go (I think he didn't want to
leave) which freaked Nikki a little bit,
but she followed him right to the door
like sweethearts. It was so cute! I
was so happy with her so I laid down on
the floor and played (spoiled) with her
for a little while, which I normally do
every night anyway, but it felt more
like a bonding experience this time.
She was a complete opposite from the
way she behaves with Rosco when they
meet outside. Of course the Pom wasn't
jumping all around and all over her and
they were both in the house, off leash,
which I'm sure may have had some
influence on Nikki's behavior. I know
that dogs, like people, have different
personalities and I'm guessing that
Nikki might not care all that much for
Rosco's personality (and abundance of
energy) but does like the Pom's, which
is more suited to her own.
Without touching off another
argument, does anyone have any thoughts
about her change in behavior? Is there
a way I can use this to help her get
used to Rosco's energetic
ersonality? - - Les
1 2 3 4 5
Without touching off another argument, does anyone have any thoughts about her change in behavior? Is there a way I can use this to help her get used to Rosco's energetic ersonality?

Since you know now that Nikki was fine with another dog in her territory, I'd suggest letting her meet Rosco off-leash in your apartment. She may surprise you. :}
Canine Action Dog Trainer
http://www.canineaction.com
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
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Les:>Greetings group,
My concerns about Nikki'ssocialization with other dogs were laid

to rest, so to speak, this evening. We
got a visit from my ex tonight, she
brought along a 5 year old male
Pomeranian (sp?) that she has been
watching for a friend. Right away I
thought that I was going to have to keep
an eye on Nikki but, to my amazement,
they got along great. The Pom (can't
remember his name) was pretty calm and
quiet, just like Nikki normally is and
after the obligatory meet and sniff,
they were trotting around the house,
playing together. I was amazed Emotion: smile
Nikki even shared her toys with him!
I was so happy and I made sure thatI praised both of them for playing so

nice. They played together for about a
half hour until they got tired, got a
drink (Nikki even let him drink from her
bowl) and then laid down on Nikki's
favorite rug together. The Pom only
barked a couple of times when it was
time to go (I think he didn't want to
leave) which freaked Nikki a little bit,
but she followed him right to the door
like sweethearts. It was so cute! I
was so happy with her so I laid down on
the floor and played (spoiled) with her
for a little while, which I normally do
every night anyway, but it felt more
like a bonding experience this time.
She was a complete opposite from theway she behaves with Rosco when they

meet outside. Of course the Pom wasn't
jumping all around and all over her and
they were both in the house, off leash,
which I'm sure may have had some
influence on Nikki's behavior. I know
that dogs, like people, have different
personalities and I'm guessing that
Nikki might not care all that much for
Rosco's personality (and abundance of
energy) but does like the Pom's, which
is more suited to her own.
And she had no contact with other dogs (other than her mother and littermates) until after she was 4 mos. old? Gee. Maybe some people around here were WRONG about what the critical socialization period means. Oh, but then, I forgot: you said that Nikki could form friendships* with other dogs, but that she'd never be truly *socialized.

Sorry, Les. Despite your evidence to the contrary, your dog is still not socialized.
Or maybe she just didn't like Roscoe's energy, which is what I said originally.
Good goin', Les. And be very careful about following Leah's advice. It looks to me that Nikki knows more about dogs than Leah does. Nikki may have a reason for not liking Roscoe, having nothing to do with the critical socialization period.
When my dog and I go walking I'll often get an invitation from another dog's owner, "Oh, my dog is very friendly! Can't he come say hello?" And if Fred wants to keep his distance, I let him because every time I've forced the issue the other dog tried to attack Fred, and the dog's owner would say something like, "I've never seen my dog act like this before!" Maybe not, but Fred instinctively knew the other dog better than his owner did.
I also get, "Keep your dog away! My dog hates other dogs!" And if Fred wants to go up to other dog despite all protestations about the other dog's aggressive nature, guess what I always hear? "Well, I'll be darned! My dog is never* friendly with other dogs!" But you see, Fred *knew that dog would be friendly.
How does he know? I have no idea. When it comes to choosing his friends, Freddie is a lot smarter than I am, and I trust his instincts implicitly.
Still, meeting Roscoe inside your apartment might* feel safer to Nikki. And if they *do play and have fun, well good! But if they don't, it won't be because she's too old to be socialized. SHE'S ALREADY BEEN SOCIALIZED TO OTHER DOGS BY BEING RAISED WITH HER MOTHER AND LITTERMATES!!
(Sorry if I've stirred up the pot again, Les.)
I also get, "Keep your dog away! My dog hates other dogs!" And if Fred wants to go up to ... be darned! My dog is never* friendly with other dogs!" But you see, Fred *knew that dog would be friendly.

I just want to make sure that I understand what is going on here.

If you are walking Fred, and another dog owner says to not let your dog come near their dog, you allow Fred to do it anyways.

Marcel and Moogli
Marcel:>I just want to make sure that I understand what is going on here.
If you are walking Fred, and another dog owner says to not let your dogcome near their dog, you allow Fred to do it anyways.

Depends on the dog's owner. If they seem really freaked out, no. If they're willing to listen to reason, then yes.
Marcel

I just want to make sure that I understand what ... near their dog, you allow Fred to do it anyways.

Depends on the dog's owner. If they seem really freaked out, no. If they're willing to listen to reason, then yes.

But the question is, do you get them to listen to reason before or after you have let Fred interact with their dog?

Marcel and Moogli
Marcel:>But the question is, do you get them to listen to reason before or after you have let Fred interact with their dog?
Depends on what you mean by interact. Usually it's before Fred comes close enough to be a problem for them, emotionally. Sometimes the fact that the other dog isn't showing the usual signs of aggression that the owner is used to kind of throws them off and they start to realize on their own that there isn't going to be a problem.
When my dog and I go walking I'll often get an invitation from another dog's owner, "Oh, my dog is ... my dog act like this before!" Maybe not, but Fred instinctively knew the other dog better than his owner did.

Honestly, it would be nice if Fred would extend this courtesy to others. He has approached a number of dogs (offlead) on the streets of this neighborhood without being given any welcoming signs from the dog being approached.
I also get, "Keep your dog away! My dog hates other dogs!" And if Fred wants to go up to ... be darned! My dog is never* friendly with other dogs!" But you see, Fred *knew that dog would be friendly.

Not always, Lee..not always.
In fact, one of those people was me*. I was saying "No thanks, he doesn't want to say 'hi'". You paid me no attention and "let" (encouraged, actually) Fred to continue approaching. Ironically, it wasn't that the dog was aggressive in any way, it was that this particular dog has very specific stress reactions when it comes to other dogs. Its very difficult to see clearly, unless you really know this dog *and* really understand the different ways stress can manifest. His response is admittedly quite subtle..but at that point, I wasn't asking you to "read" his stress levels, but merely to respect the fact that *I knew what his limits were. You didn't respect that and neither did Fred.
And I ended up having to do calming work with him for the next 20 minutes after that little encounter. And, no, I was not pleased. And, no, he didn't have any fun.
Its a tricky thing to know someone on here from real life. I know canis pretty well (I like and respect him a lot, in fact, even when I don't agree with him)..and I have to say I was never even once so much as tempted to call him on anything here in the ng. But then I never saw him use disrespect coupled with outright hyperbole to make some sort of "point" the way I've seen you do. He was always pretty honest when making a point. And tended to allow for differences in opinion without someone having to end up being talked down to.
I've already said that I think you do have some value to add to the dialogue on dog training and drive, and I still think so. But when you use..well, I feel the need to use the term mis-truths...in order to "prove" a point, you lose credibility with me. And that makes me sad because I think you can do better than that.
Tara
Tara:>Not always, Lee..not always.
In fact, one of those people was *me*. I was saying "No thanks, hedoesn't want to say 'hi'". You paid me no attention and "let" (encouraged, actually) Fred to continue approaching.

When and where did this take place? I have a vague memory of some such encounter, but can't really get a fix on it. I was a bit more cavalier about such encounters in the past. I'm usually more circumspect and respectful now. Honest.
Tara:>I wasn't asking you to "read" his stress levels, but merely to respect the fact that *I* knew what his limits were. You didn't respect that and neither did Fred.
Well, I have no idea what you mean by "neither did Fred". Fred always has a good reason for doing whatever he does, even if no one else understands it at the time. But if *I* was the cause of a dog's stress levels going up I sincerely apologize. It's the last thing I'd want to do.

And yes, anyone reading my posts should have a hyperbole filter on their computer screen (not a #10 or even a #5, a #2 or #3 should work fine).

But you're right. It wasn't a proper way for *me* to have behaved, and I apologize for it.
Tara:>I never saw him (Canis) use disrespect coupled with outright hyperbole to make some sort of "point" the way I've seen you do. He was always pretty honest when making a point. And tended to allow for differences in opinion without someone having to end up being talked down to.
Canis and I are two different people with different personalities. He has a more quiet, laid-back style, with a kind of wry humor. I tend to take over a room or leave. And I don't use hyperbole to make a point. I do it to . . .
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