If the only cats allowed to breed are the strays and those belonging to 'irresponsible' cat owners what happens to the gene pool in time? We are told that prey animals are made stronger as a whole because their enemies eleminate the weak and old. Would that theory not work in reverse for cats? I realize that this is not the question of the century. I'm interested in your thoughts on this. very time I see an absolutly gorgeous cat that id love tohave a kitten from m told it's been 'fixed' (I have 5 well-cared for strays).
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If the only cats allowed to breed are the strays and those belonging to 'irresponsible' cat owners what happens to the gene pool in time?

My guess is that the gene pool would become stronger. I'm thinking of my sister's dogs - the purebreds & the mixed breeds. So far, the longest living (he's 17) & healthiest of the bunch is a mixed breed, who was picked up by her husband as a stray when he was a puppy. I'm also thinking of the various cat breeds, & how people have manipulated them so that some breeds are now prone to this or that malady - as certain dog breeds are, also - doing little to enhance their health or longevity.

Cathy

"When it's not too hot, not too cold
Not too meek, not too bold
When it's just right and you have sunlight..."
("Hurricane Eye") Paul Simon
We
If the only cats allowed to breed are the strays and those belongingto 'irresponsible' cat owners what happens to the gene pool in time?

The gene pool will grow stronger. It thrives on diversity. When cats are selectively bred illnesses and genetic defects are bred in.
The gene pool will grow stronger. It thrives on diversity. When cats are selectively bred illnesses and genetic defects are bred in.

Does this happen even when cats are selectively bred to reduce or eliminate illnesses and genetic defects?
The gene pool will grow stronger. It thrives on diversity. Whencats are selectively bred illnesses and genetic defects are bred in.

Does this happen even when cats are selectively bred to reduce oreliminate illnesses and genetic defects?

Probaby not, but that is not usually what they are bred for. Are you a breeder?
cats

No, but I like to go to cat shows so I've met a number of breeders. I don't know any that are not trying to eliminate genetic defects in their breeding programs, nor would they breed an unhealthy cat.
cats eliminate Probaby not, but that is not usually what they are bred for. Are you a breeder?

No, but I like to go to cat shows so I've met a number of breeders. Idon't know any that are not trying to eliminate genetic defects in theirbreeding programs, nor would they breed an unhealthy cat.

I've gone to cat shows & enjoyed them. But... what about the super-squished faces/noses of today's Persians, for ex?
Cathy

"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon
I've gone to cat shows & enjoyed them. But... what about the super-squished faces/noses of today's Persians, for ex? Cathy

Pfft. Rosettes. That's what it's about.
Sherry
I've gone to cat shows & enjoyed them. But... what about the super-squished faces/noses of today's Persians, for ex?

As far as I can tell, the breeders have been backing away from the extreme faces for a while now. Lately in fact, I don't see nearly as many Persians at shows anyway. The Maine Coons seem the most popular these days. To be honest, the breeders I have met and become acquaintanced with are breeders of types of cats that have few known genetic health problems like Birmans, Chartreux, American and British shorthairs, etc. I only know one Persian breeder well, but she breeds silvers and golds and for some reason that type has not had the extreme faces. I don't particularly like Persians so those aren't the cages I gravitate to.
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