Regarding the previous thread about the water snake ("copperhead"):

Georgia law prohibits the keeping of any native herp species, with the exception of venomous snakes. That means you can't legally keep the recently-found water snake, or even a store-bought corn snake. Oddly enough, if the snake found WAS a copperhead, you'd be able to keep it!

In addition, most states (not sure about Georgia) prohibit the release of captive-held wildlife EVEN if it was just "temporary," due to the possibility of exposure to pathogens (such as if you had an extensive collection of reptiles to which the new animal could potentially be exposed).
So basically, it's a real Catch 22! Can't keep it, can't release it! My advice is to eat it. Emotion: smile
Chris

http://www.mcmartinville.com
So basically, it's a real Catch 22! Can't keep it, can't release it! My advice is to eat it. Emotion: smile Chris

Or wear it as a bracelet.
So basically, it's a real Catch 22! Can't keep it, can't release it!My advice is to eat it. Emotion: smile Chris

Or wear it as a bracelet.

Eating it would get rid of all (identifiable) evidence it was poached in the first place.
Georgia law prohibits the keeping of any native herp species, with the exception of venomous snakes.

I was aware of this legislation, but as I thought I was capturing a copperhead, I'm not sure where that falls into the realm of things. On a lighter note, the State site claims that only "poisonous" snakes can be kept as pets. Nice going there, GA gov't. Always on the ball. http://georgiawildlife.dnr.state.ga.us/content/displaycontent.asp?txtDocument=6&txtPage=2
In addition, most states (not sure about Georgia) prohibit the release of captive-held wildlife EVEN if it was just "temporary,"

not sure where to find this info
So basically, it's a real Catch 22! Can't keep it, can't release it! My advice is to eat it. Emotion: smile

Well, if I'm not careful, it might accidentally escape back to its original home.

In other news, he is clearly enjoying his temporary habitat and all the fish I can feed him. http://www.prism.gatech.edu/~gtg767e/watersnake.html

Scott
Ignorance of a law does not exclude you from it.
Georgia law prohibits the keeping of any native herp species, with the exception of venomous snakes.

I was aware of this legislation, but as I thought I was capturing a copperhead, I'm not sure where that ... site claims that only "poisonous" snakes can be kept as pets. Nice going there, GA gov't. Always on the ball.

http://georgiawildlife.dnr.state.ga.us/content/displaycontent.asp?txtDocumen t=6&txtPage=2
my northern water snake eats so much fish im surprised I still have a house!!
lighter note, the State site claims that only "poisonous" snakes can be kept as pets. Nice going there, GA gov't. Always on the ball.

Several states make that error. A city in Texas once banned all poisonous turtles.
In addition, most states (not sure about Georgia) prohibit the releaseof captive-held wildlife EVEN if it was just "temporary,"

not sure where to find this info

It would leave less room for wildlife departments to conduct sting operations if the laws were 1. written clearly and 2. made easily accessible (animal regs all together, for example, instead of some tucked away in obscure agricultural regs).
frogz13 (Email Removed) ignorantly insisted:
Ignorance of a law does not exclude you from it.

I never claimed to be ignorant of the law. In fact, I specifically said >
I was aware of this legislation

and I never asked to be excluded from any laws. I was simply letting the forum know my situation.
I'm sure accidentally herping a nonvenomous
snake might hold less severe penalties than intentionally doing so, just as accidentally killing someone (say in a car wreck) is negligent homicide or manslaughter which can be a misdemeanor instead of murder which is a felony.
Anyway thanks for the legal advice, I'll be sure to be more careful next time.

Scott