I have a baby corn snake, it's about 3 to 4 months old. I have been thinking about getting another baby corn snake, but was unsure if I would be able to put it in the same tank. But I do not want to breed, would 2 males or 2 females fight? How can I find out what I have now male or female? Would the pet store I bought it from be able to tell me if I took it back there? Would the snake I have now accept a new snake into his habitat? We he be territorial and not accept it.

I thought he would much happier with a buddy, he hides alot even at night, but he is eatting well, and loves to be held.

Does anyone have any ideas?
Many breeders say that you shouldn't keep two snakes of any species, even the same together but I disagree. My parents have kept two female corn snakes together for years with no problems. Just make sure to feed in seperate containers.
I have a baby corn snake, it's about 3 to 4 months old. I have been thinking about getting another ... the snake I have now accept a new snake into his habitat? We he be territorial and not accept it.

We keep our two female balls together with no problems. They eat at the same time in the same aquarium with no problem, too. I don't know about corn snakes but my balls are pretty docile and they do curl up together in their rock, or the water bowl.
Marie
There's little chance that two corns kept together will harm each other. Cannibalism isn't unheard of, but it's very rare. And they don't fight, nor do they enjoy each other's company. They just peacefully coexist.
The biggest concern is illness, especially with baby corns which are somewhat more vulnerable to health problems than adults. If the new corn has disease or parasites, you risk losing both of them if they're housed together. Also, if you find a regurgitated pinky you might not be able to tell which snake is sick if they're together, and it's essential that you treat the sick one properly or it will die.

To determine the sex of your snake, you could take it to the pet store if there's someone there who knows how to sex a snake (there are a couple of methods, one using a probe and one using a technique to pop the sex organs out of the vent on a male). Or you could see if a local vet could tell you.
Mary
On 21 May 2006 15:33:53 -0700, "Roberta z"
Many breeders say that you shouldn't keep two snakes of any species, even the same together but I disagree. My parents have kept two female corn snakes together for years with no problems. Just make sure to feed in seperate containers.

You can, so long as they are the same size, in a large enclosure and are well fed (and aren't a species prone to cannibalism, of course). I kept corn and rat snakes in groups for many years with no problems whatsoever.
Many breeders say that you shouldn't keep two snakes of ... no problems. Just make sure to feed in seperate containers.

You can, so long as they are the same size, in a large enclosure and are well fed (and aren't a species prone to cannibalism, of course). I kept corn and rat snakes in groups for many years with no problems whatsoever.

i keep one corn and 2 rats in 1 cage, mix sex. the largest rat is 2-3 tmes bigger than the corn, been together for well over a year, never had a problem but thats my risk.
feed seperate tho
>>
It's kinda funny how often people associate human behaviours and feelings with what animals "should" feel. Snakes don't crave companionship, he won't be happier with a new roommate, but he'll tolerate it because he has no choice. It's always coincidence when snakes are curled up together. They are usually competing for the heat source.
You'll have to call the pet store to find out if anyone there is experienced with sexing snakes. Do it wrong and you could injure the snake.
I've kept snakes of the same genius/species together and twice it's backfired on me. One rattlesnake ate her sister, and another kingsnake ate his brother. I know kingsnakes are known for eating other snakes, but they were well fed and fat and who knows what spurred him to eat the other. Any time I've kept snakes together, they've been fed separately and after losing two snakes and having to clean up the regurg, I've stopped keeping snakes together. Don't want to risk losing another.
>>
In both cases of mine, the snakes were identical in length and weight and one ate the other. Probably the reason for both regurg-ing. Not fun to clean up a regurged snake (anything regurged is gross!)