a friend and I are teaching a tunnelers class for those folks who want to work on handling, but are still working on obstacle issues.

We need some exercises to help develop speed in tunnels. All ideas welcome! Thanks.
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a friend and I are teaching a tunnelers class for those folks who want to work on handling, but are still working on obstacle issues. We need some exercises to help develop speed in tunnels. All ideaswelcome! Thanks.

Straight tunnel and have someone hold the dog, Rev them up, send them through the tunnel and throw food/toy to encourage them to drive forward.

Gradually round the tunnel. Continue throwing the food/toy.

Go back to two tunnels straight. Throw toy after second tunnel. ETc.

Melissa S. Frye
Skyrocket cockers www.mfrye.com/skyrocket/
**From: "Child" (Email Removed)
a friend and I are teaching a tunnelers class for those folks who want to work on handling, but are still working on obstacle issues.

We need some exercises to help develop speed in tunnels.**

Throw a toy just before they exit the tunnel to get speed coming out of the tunnel. Have someone hold the dog by the collar (pulling and lunging is allowed) while the owner goes to the end of the tunnel and teases the dog, when the dog is straining to run through the tunnel and get to the owner the person holding the dog lets go.
I'm not sure how much handling you can work on on just tunnels, a bit I guess, but not really all that much.
Lauralyn
My agility dogs:
Cheyenne MXJ MX, AAD
Shylo MXJ MX, AAD
Lakota - the crazy BC!
http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/view?username=computype2
I'm not sure how much handling you can work on on just tunnels, a bit I guess, but not really all that much.

Really? Give me one obstacle and I'll put together a one hour class using just it, and build on it during a second class. A jump is the most versatile, but a tunnel is good, too.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
I'm not sure how much handling you can work on on just tunnels, a bit I guess, but not really all that much.

Really? Give me one obstacle and I'll put together a one hour class using just it, and build on it during a second class. A jump is the most versatile, but a tunnel is good, too.

Just watch how many people NQ on wrong end of the tunnel challenges.

Melissa S. Frye
Skyrocket cockers www.mfrye.com/skyrocket/
CompuType2 said in rec.pets.dogs.behavior: Really? Give me one obstacle and ... is the most versatile, but a tunnel is good, too.

Just watch how many people NQ on wrong end of the tunnel challenges.

No kidding! Also, watch how few dogs (mine included) are good at accepting rear crosses on straight tunnels, or who can switch leads in tunnels. Watch how many will come out and spin, even with verbal cues. I

I don't think we work tunnels NEAR enough. Because most dogs like them, we tend to take them for granted. We should work rear, front, and blind crosses and definitely banking/speed as well as tunnel entrance discriminations.
Use youre voice, ok and toys and the other tips, but exite your dog with your voice it really works to speed them up!
Andrea Emotion: smile
http://www.youwager.com
I don't think we work tunnels NEAR enough.

Yes. I recently found that Friday will pop out of a tunnel, almost every time only when it's curved near the entry when I do a too-close rear cross.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
I don't think we work tunnels NEAR enough.

Yes. I recently found that Friday will pop out of a tunnel, almost every time only when it's curved near the entry when I do a too-close rear cross.

Cala broke a tunnel support in May by turning around in the middle of the thing and flying back out the entry after I did too hard a rear cross. Oops.
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