Has anyone had a golden retriever crossed with a poodle. I'm told they are virtually non-shedding. I found some breeders in my area of Toronto, Ontario but they are charging about $1500 Canadian for the dogs. Is there anywhere else to get a goldendoodle cheeper? are they a good dog?
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Is there anywhere else to get a goldendoodle cheeper? are they a good dog?

Try the local pound. There's no good way to determine if this mixed breed dog is going to be either non-shedding or "good."
@j27g2000cwj.googlegroups.com:
Has anyone had a golden retriever crossed with a poodle. I'm told they are virtually non-shedding.

That's completely untrue. While it IS true that they tend to shed significantly less than a Golden Retriever (I think there's a thread going on here right now about just HOW MUCH that actually is), they Do still shed.
I found some breeders in my area of Toronto, Ontario but they are charging about $1500 Canadian for the dogs. Is there anywhere else to get a goldendoodle cheeper? are they a good dog?[/nq]Designer mixed breeds are really controversial. I have to say, as a trainer who has worked with dozens of them, I have yet to see one that had a steady, solid temperament. Most breeders are, by definition, working with breeding "stock " (I hate that word in terms of dogs, but that's the accurate term) that is less than stellar. Standard Poodles have a lot of temperament issues in the not-so-well-bred lines (which is most of them in North America).

This includes major fear issues, shy shrp behaviors (including biting), and overall skittishness. It would be nice if the calmer temperament of the Golden Retriever were able to balance that out, but genetics simply do not work that way. Until breeders learn how to aactually splice genes and select exatcly* which parts of which dog they want the puppies to inherit, it will *always be a crap shoot. You could end up with the heavier shedding coat of the Golden, with the shy-sharp temperament of the Poodle.

The tendancy towards Hip Dysplasia of the Golden, with the Thyroid issues of the Poodle. Many of the "Hybrid" breeders try to tell you that first gen "hybrids" don't get diseases, but that is a flat out lie.

A good number of the purposely bred Golden/Poodle mixes I've worked with ended up with Hip Dysplasia before they were even a year old. That's because a lot of the designer breeders simply don't do what they should be doing to eliminate those diseases from their lines (some even believe the lie that first gen hybrids don't get the typical illnesses and don't understand that they are creating sick dogs.)
There are more and more of these purposely bred mixes ending up in shelters and rescues every day. If you want to get one, I would go that route. At least a rescue is more likely to know about what kind of dog you're going to end up with..and even if not, you won't be rewarding an irresponsible breeder with over a thousand bucks for mixing dogs simply for the cute name.
Tara
While it IS true that they tend to shed significantly less than a Golden Retriever

Hoo boy - not all of them! I've been pretty amazed at how heavy a shedder some are.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
You could end up with the heavier shedding coat of the Golden, with the shy-sharp temperament of the Poodle.

Whoops - this is very true!

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
The replies you have received are complete nonsense. If you want to know the real deal about the
Goldendoodle..which happens to be a registered hybrid BTW...go to our site at http://www.goldendoodleworld.com
You will find them available for less than $1500 as the Goldendoodle's popularity has soared since

1997 and is steadily becoming more popular than the Golden Retriever,itself.
The Goldendoodle...when created correctly sheds very little. The person who told you they are heavy
shedders must have come across a Goldendoodle that was created improperly. We've created
Goldendoodles since 1999 and while you can watch them go through their many coat changes and phases, you don't see the hair shedding. That doesn't mean they are a non shedding dog. Even a
Chinese Crested Hairless dog sheds. Someone here recommended you check the dog pound. Fortunately for now, the GOldendoodle rarely finds itself in such a place which is why you'll need to find someone who is either "re-homing" a doodle or go through a breeder who creates them.
Goldendoodle..which happens to be a registered hybrid BTW

"Registered hybrid"? What on earth does that mean?
The Goldendoodle...when created correctly sheds very little.

"Created"? Do you make them in your Frankenlaboratory?

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
The replies you have received are complete nonsense. If you want to know the real deal about the Goldendoodle..which happens to be a registered hybrid BTW...

"Registered" means nothing other than that the birth and the parents are written down somewhere, and the registrars you guys use would register a pet pig if you sent them the money. They're the pet world equivalent of the
International Star Registry.
You're the only person here who has a financial interest in the "Goldendoodle," and the incentives for your provision of information are very different for the incentives for everybody else.
Fortunately for now, the GOldendoodle rarely finds itself in such a place which is why you'll need to find someone who is either "re-homing" a doodle or go through a breeder who creates them.

The local Craigslist has an ad from someone unloading a so-called "Labradoodle" because her husband's allergic to the dog. Fortunately for you guys and unfortunately for the rest of us, the question of whether or not misleading or even downright dishonest advertising is protected speech is still open.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

If you can't say it clearly, you don't understand it yourself John Searle
Tara,
unfortunately your post in here is not accurate 100% and is misleading. First of all, while it is a noble
thing to try and prevent HD in dogs..testing in no way prevents the breeding dogs from having HD free
offspring. That's a fact whether you want to believe it or not. Many breeders who have their breeding dogs tested still produce dysplastic puppies and some of those breeders were show breeders or veterinarians. Until a genetic laboratory for dogs can create DNA markers that can provide a breeder
with "carrier" information on their breeding dogs...there is no test on the face of this earth that can guarantee anyone...breeder or buyer...a disease free dog. Humans haven't perfected disease free humans and I'm not sure why people like yourself believe it is possible for the dog.
We have created Goldendoodles and other Poodle hybrids since 1999. We have had consistancy in solid grounded..very intelligent...loving and outgoing temperaments on our hybrids and we've had consistancy in coat. The only inconsistancy we've had with hybrids is individual sizes because they are indeed a hybrid. Lumping the "Goldendoodle" into a whole is quite unfair to the Goldendoodle. It would be similar to lump all purebred dogs into categories because temperaments, coat...etc..really has to do with the breeder...their breeding stock and their experience. If a breeder has crappy breeding stock, they will have crappy offspring. Our Goldendoodles are created with dogs who have over 400 OFA good,
Champion ancestors that came from some of the best purebred Golden Retriever and Poodle breeders out there..some do not even exist any more since our pedigrees date back well into the early 1930s.

You are also incorrect about calling the Goldendoodle and other hybrids "designer" dogs. This dog's mixture began in Australia for a purpose. It was to help those own an assistance dog who had allergies to heavy shedding purebred dogs. Also, I don't know which breeder sits back raking in thousands of dollars and its obvious you are not a breeder because if you were, you would not be making that statement. Being a breeder is a never ending job that goes around the clock, seven days a week with no vacation time...no time off and a breeder NEVER makes a real profit considering the fact they spend thousands of their own dollars on their dogs and puppies..vet costs are ever increasing year by year
and there is nothing cheap about raising dogs and breeding them. Breeding is NOT a 9-5 job that provides one with a paycheck. You need a reality check on your comment about that part. That's a dream...not reality! I wish I could sit back...collect the cash and take a trip around the world from selling dogs...wouldn't THAT be a hoot! Dream on. I don't know of too many people willing to shovel dog poop for a living that has no insurance, pension or other perk benefits and continually work without a day off for little to no pay. Its really a shame when people such as yourself put down not only an incredible and terrific dog...but also the ones who create them.
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