Hi,
I am living is a meduim sized apartment and I am looking to purchase a dog. Although I am permitted to have pets, if there are any noise complaints by my neighbors, I will be forced to either move or give the dog to friends to take care of for a while.
Because of this I am looking for a small, low-energy dog. I would prefer one that has short hair and requires less grooming. I would also like a cute, cudly dog.
1. My top choice was the beagle, but I have read that they are noisy.Is this accurate?
2. The only other dog that I have been able to find that islow-energy, and quiet is the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. Any thoughts on this breed and apartments?
3. Do you have any other suggestions of dogs that would be good for meand the apartment?
Thanks,
GW
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Hi, I am living is a meduim sized apartment and I am looking to purchase a dog. Although I am ... and apartments? 3. Do you have any other suggestions of dogs that would be good for me and the apartment?

Do you live over another tenant or are you on the ground floor? What do you have in mind with regards to exercising and training the dog? There are alot of breeds that would fit the basics you describe but likely only one or two who would really be a good match for you. That's why its important to give as many details as possible.

Tara
Hi, I am living is a meduim sized apartment and I am looking to purchase a dog. Although I am ... to find that is low-energy, and quiet is the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. Any thoughts on this breed and apartments?

I own two CKCS. They are great dogs, but there are some cautions about becoming an owner:
CKCS have a great propensity for a number of genetic problems, most notably Mitral Valve Disease. MVD is so prevalent that, by age 5, over half of CKCS have this disorder, while nearly all have it by age 10. In addition, many CKCS have problems with luxating patellas, some eye problems, and, for a small breed, a fair proportion of hip dysplasia. For these reasons, discriminating breeding is a *must*.
Quite frankly, there are no lines that are without MVD. If a breeder tells you it doesn't happen in his/hers, he/she is either lying, or they don't keep track of the dogs they breed. It *is* probably going to happen, although there are lines where the onset seems to be later than others. The risk of other problems (luxating patellas, hip dysplasia, eye problems) can be minimized (but not completely eradicated) by good breeding practices.

Because good breeders have to be so selective about their breedings, there are usually long waiting lists for well-bred Cavs. You need to be prepared to wait.
Generally Cavs are incredibly loving dogs. They've been called the "comfort spaniel", and it is an appropriate nickname. My boy would rather sit on his dad's lap than eat steak (yes, we've tried it!). Because they are so attached to their humans, they don't tend to do well when left alone for long periods. They can become neurotic barkers if they don't get the attention they need.

I hope this helps. If you'd like more information, e-mail me and I can provide some good links.
Sheila
Hi there,
I don't know enough about any particular breed (except what I have and they are not for an apartment based on your limitations for noise,size,etc)but have you considered a local shelter or rescue for a small mixed breed that might fit your needs? Perhaps an adult? I would think if you explained your situation to them, they'd either tell you what they have or keep a look out. They don't want a bad match either so they are usually willing to work with you. I am not sure if a purebred is important to you or not, but there are some wonderful pets at shelter, as I am sure you know. Emotion: smile Many times you get the best of all breed characteristics in a mix, (and the opposite can happen too).
I have never owned a beagle but the couple I have experienced were loud and hyper.(but adorable nonetheless!)
Good Luck!
Julie
"It does not require many words to speak the truth." -Chief Joseph
Beagles tend to be VERY noisy and VERY high energy!

Have you thought about a Pug? They are great, comical little dogs that are not yappy (and don't seem to have loud barks even when they do get excited). They are fairly low energy - in fact, they can't exercise heavily or get too hot because of their smooshed-in faces. They do shed, but the amount of hair isn't too bad because they have a smaller surface area of hair. They are one of the largest of the "small" breeds. I know there are some health and breeding issues particular to this breed - you might want to check out the Pug FAQ that comes with this newsgroup.
HTH,
- Lisa
Have you thought about a Pug? They are great, comical little dogs that are not yappy (and don't seem to ... are fairly low energy - in fact, they can't exercise heavily or get too hot because of their smooshed-in faces.

I have friends who live in a tiny apartment in Brooklyn who own a pair of Pugs they adopted from the local animal shelter. They were a purebred brother and sister, about 3 years old, who had been given because their owner had died. They are a happy pair and do well in the apartment. Cute dogs.
Debbie
I know this sounds counter-intuitive, but please consider a grown (adult) Greyhound. Though not small, they are about as clean as cats, don't shed, are coach potatoes, rarely bark, very dignified, and are recommended for apartments. These dogs are readily available since they are bred for racing, and their careers end after just a few years. Like all dogs, you'll have to take it on 3/4 potty breaks per day.
**Experts Estimate the Economy to Grow at a rapid 4% in 2004.** **Without the Bush Tax Cuts and Low Interest rates, Growth would be -1.5%**
PS:
I meant couch potatoes, not "coach." Some greys sleep up to 18hrs per day. Pugs are popular too.
-Rich
Our pug barked at anything and everything, and they shed VAST amounts of hair!
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