My daughters bday is coming up in April & she has been asking for a bird. Does anyone have any suggestions on which sort of bird is good as a first pet bird for a kid. I dont want a big one!! But I do want one that we can take out of the cage & be able to hold! Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
Crystina
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My daughters bday is coming up in April & she has been asking for a bird. Does anyone have any ... one that we can take out of the cage & be able to hold! Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

How old is she?
What's your budget?
Is she (and are you) aware that owning a bird can be a 20-40 year (or even longer) commitment? Is she old enough to understand what that means?
Rick
My daughters bday is coming up in April & she has been asking for a bird. Does anyone have any ... that we can take out of the cage & be able to hold! Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Crystina

My parents gave me my first parakeet when I was 6 years old. It was the sweetest little bird. Not only did it teach me all about responsibility of feeding, watering, cleaning the cage, it became my best friend. Be sure your daughter knows not to have the bird out if the doors or windows are open.
When my dad was transferred from NJ to CA, the bird made the trip in the car across country without a fuss. (When we were later transferred overseas when I was 9 years old, we gave the care of the 'keet over to my mom's parents. They'd never had a pet before. They loved that bird!)

Parakeets are definitely friendly, easy to handle and tame if you get them young. Some tips when picking a parakeet: make sure the stripes on the forehead go all the way down to the cere (nose) - this indicates a really young bird which is what you want. I never found much difference in paying (okay, we're talking 12 years ago) $14.99 for a parakeet at a pet shop as opposed to a $50 "hand raised" parakeet; if they are young enough they were hand fed anyway and I never saw a difference.
I've had many over the years; honestly, the most friendly budgie I ever had was a foundling my brother caught in the back yard. We didn't know how old Buddy was, but his blue cere indicated he was a boy budgie and his forehead was white feathers. I was 14 when he was found and 28 when he died.

Good luck with your daughter's birthday present!
Jill
My daughters bday is coming up in April & she has been asking for a bird. Does anyone have any ... that we can take out of the cage & be able to hold! Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Crystina

It depends on how old your daughter is and if the whole family wants this pet. Cockatiels or budgies make good first birds but no matter what bird you get, you need to learn an awful lot about caring for it, and providing it with plenty of time out of the cage, a large cage, toys, a proper quality diet with fresh fruit and vegs. Also bear in mind that all birds are noisy and make a mess with seed husks dropped all over the floor beneath the cage.What will you do if the bird dosesn't like to be held? Also bear in mind that all birds have a sharp beak and will use it on occasion.
Is she (and are you) aware that owning a bird can be a 20-40 year (or even longer) commitment?

Why do you people say such ridiculous crap?
Next year well after the novelty wears off for the kid, and Dad is endlessly annoyed with the noise, and Mom is tired of being the only one who takes care of the thing, why should anyone think that they have to keep the bird? Or maybe there is no "Dad" and Mom's job is eliminated and she has no choice but to start saying "would you like the combo meal?" and can barely feed the kids and pay the bills much less feed a bird appropriately. Or next week the parents decide that they don't want anything to do with having a bird in their house. Is it better for the bird to stay where it is merely tolerated and allowed to exist, or would it be better for the bird to move on to a new home?
Things change because "*** happens." There is nothing wrong with being "committed" to the care of a pet when you acquire one and then having to give up on that "commitment" for any reason in the future.

Ideally, every pet would live out a great life in a single home. But then also ideally, I wouldn't have to come her and tell all the *** morons that they are *** morons and the rest of you wouldn't have to get your panties in a wad because of what I post.
But because we live in reality, ideal situations are not all that common.

Steve
Is she (and are you) aware that owning a bird can be a 20-40 year (or even longer) commitment?

Why do you people say such ridiculous crap? Next year well after the novelty wears off for the kid, and ... tolerated and allowed to exist, or would it be better for the bird to move on to a new home?

I thought of my sister when I read your post.. She has an incredibly beautiful keet she bought years ago as a pet for her son, and sure enough a few months after buying it the son lost all interest. Now this thing sits in a corner of their house, day after day, month after month with virtually no interaction with any other living thing, human or otherwise.
Things change because "*** happens." There is nothing wrong with being "committed" to the care of a pet when you acquire one and then having to give up on that "commitment" for any reason in the future.

Both of those are fine. The problem is when animals are abused by being stuck in the middle of those two situations. I've seen it first-hand far too often.
Ideally, every pet would live out a great life in a single home. But then also ideally, I wouldn't have ... morons and the rest of you wouldn't have to get your panties in a wad because of what I post.

The only one here with his panties in a wad appears to be you.
But because we live in reality, ideal situations are not all that common.

There's nothing wrong with reminding someone that bird ownership is a long-term commitment, longer than with dogs or cats or almost any other pet. Get over yourself.
Rick
My daughters bday is coming up in April & she has been asking for a bird. Does anyone have any ... one that we can take out of the cage & be able to hold! Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

In my opinion, a ringneck dove would be an excellent choice. They are inexpensive, and easy to care for. This is a bird that can be taken out of its cage and held, if you are so inclined. In fact, my wife and I usually leave our dove's cage open when we're home and alert, and let the dove have the free run of our apartment. As I type this, he's standing on my computer's monitor, enjoying the warmth therefrom.

While Avery (our dove) isn't exactly quiet, what noise he does make is much less irritating than the noise that is typically made by hookbill-type birds.
My wife and I never had a bird until a bit more than a year ago, and never thought we'd want one before then. We didn't really choose Avery, so much as he chose us. He showed up on our doorstep, cold and hungry and injured; how could we possibly refuse to take him in? See my account of this at this URL:
http://www.dovepage.com/cgi-dovepage/mb/306.shtml

I hate spam, but that isn't really part of my email address. Remove the string "HatesSpam" from this email address before you use it: (Email Removed)

Ever wonder what it'd be like to be a blood-sucking parasite?
You know she may not be able to understand tha having a bird is a lifelong commitment. But I do! I dont know much about birds EXCEPT that they can be messy, noisy & probably outlive me! I took all this into consideration before even posting a question about in this group. I posted in here so that I would not jump the gun & buy the first bird I see. I wanted opinions from people to see what sort of bird would for work for me in a home with 2 kids, so I would not be left with a bird who is doomed to spend its years trapped in a cage because it turned out to be the sort of bird who likes to nibble on hands!.

I want one that will be compatible will us & will be able to have freedom to stretch it wings about the house.
Its not just her that has interest in owning a bird.. I have always wanted one myself, so even if the interest wears off with her I will stil be there care for it & give it the attention these beautiful animals deserve. So please, when you read my post dont jump to conclusions about me & assume it will only be a phase that will be thrown out like yesterdays trash.
I am very intersted & excited about the idea of having a pet in the house any & all advice is greatly appreciated.
Crystina
You know she may not be able to understand tha having a bird is a lifelong commitment. But I do! ... & excited about the idea of having a pet in the house any & all advice is greatly appreciated. Crystina

Cyrstina, I didn't jump the gun. Don't know if you read my post or not; if not, here it is:
My parents gave me my first parakeet when I was 6 years old. It was the sweetest little bird. Not only did it teach me all about responsibility of feeding, watering, cleaning the cage, it became my best friend. Be sure your daughter knows not to have the bird out if the doors or windows are open.
When my dad was transferred from NJ to CA, the bird made the trip in the car across country without a fuss. (When we were later transferred overseas when I was 9 years old, we gave the care of the 'keet over to my mom's parents. They'd never had a pet before. They loved that bird!)

Parakeets are definitely friendly, easy to handle and tame if you get them young. Some tips when picking a parakeet: make sure the stripes on the forehead go all the way down to the cere (nose) - this indicates a really young bird which is what you want. I never found much difference in paying (okay, we're talking 12 years ago) $14.99 for a parakeet at a pet shop as opposed to a $50 "hand raised" parakeet; if they are young enough they were hand fed anyway and I never saw a difference.
Jill
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