1 2 3
I sure that would work, but for aquariums with small snakes I find the Velcro to be quick and very inconspicious. Lloyd Heilbrunn

I've found it very effective to make a screen top with velcro sewn all around the edges and the stick the other side of the velcro around the entire perimeter of the outer top edge of the tank. Nothing gets out. -M

Ugh, I HATE that closure method... Jenn pawned off a cage like that on me, I thought I liked it so I made two more... they're damn noisy to open! And substrate gets stuck in the velcro!
fr0glet
Crap.. Duct tape, baby. Just duct tape..Emotion: wink.

I've used that too. The bungee cords were effective, but not attractive, and duct tape isn't too aesthetically pleasing either.

Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News

http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups = East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =
Ugh, I HATE that closure method... Jenn pawned off a cage like that on me, I thought I liked it so I made two more... they're damn noisy to open! And substrate gets stuck in the velcro!

Yeah, well, I did say it was effective, not that it was efficient. Took me forever to get the lids open too.
-M
Crap.. Duct tape, baby. Just duct tape..Emotion: wink.

I've used that too. The bungee cords were effective, but not attractive, and duct tape isn't too aesthetically pleasing either.

Boards and cinder blocks...
K.
Boards and cinder blocks...

I've done that too! It was rough in the Dark Ages before the pet herp industry really took off!
Anybody else keep their first lizard in a coffee can?

Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News

http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups = East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =
Boards and cinder blocks...

I've done that too! It was rough in the Dark Ages before the pet herp industry really took off! Anybody else keep their first lizard in a coffee can?

Back when I was in high school, I kept my first snake (a small wild caught long nose) in a 1 gallon jar on it's side with holes punched in the lid, from the inside so the snake could not hurt it's nose on the rough edges. ;-)
I later graduated to an inexpensive cracked 20 gallon tank with a home made screen lid weighted down with a cinder block. I kept two wild caught california kingsnakes in there for awhile.
I had a rather large, wild caught gopher snake that i kept in a wire cage outside built from 1/2" hardware cloth. Fed it wild caught mice caught in a repeater trap baited with p-nut butter!

All of these snakes were eventually re-released into the wild...

I loved to go lizard catching but never kept them for more than a few days. Western fence lizards, horned lizards and California whiptails.

Did anyone know that the california whiptail lizard is one of the known lizards to be parthenogenic??? I learned that in high school biology.

http://members.aol.com/Attic21/CreatureofDay/whip.html

Fascinating....
And a beautiful lizard! Fast as lightning too.
I used to run them into soda cans to trap them. :-) When you spot the lizard, place the clean, empty can ahead of their path before chasing them. About 50% of the time, they will see it as a safe haven and run into it to hide... Worked with Western Fence lizards too!

K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...
,,,,,,<[/nq]
Did anyone know that the california whiptail lizard is one of the known lizards to be parthenogenic??? I learned that in high school biology.

California? Do you mean Colorado? Most of the parthenogenic whiptails I know of come from the New Mexico/Colorado/Texas area.

Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News

http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups = East/West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =
Anybody else keep their first lizard in a coffee can?

No lizards in Massachusetts.
I did keep a baby milksnake in a pickle jar for a few months.

Kurt
GO RED SOX !!
Did anyone know that the california whiptail lizard is one of the known lizards to be parthenogenic??? I learned that in high school biology.

California? Do you mean Colorado? Most of the parthenogenic whiptails I know of come from the New Mexico/Colorado/Texas area.

Nope! :-)
I meant California all right!
I recognize that lizard! Most of them were around Lake Elizabeth, about
35 miles West of Lancaster in the Mojave desert foothills.

We had a field guide at the time.
There is no doubt, trust me! It was one of the reasons that the zoology prof. mentioned them because we'd see them on field trips. I attended Antelope Valley community college...
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...
,,,,,,<[/nq]
Show more