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California? Do you mean Colorado? Most of the parthenogenic whiptails I know of come from the New Mexico/Colorado/Texas area.

Nope! :-) I meant California all right! I recognize that lizard! Most of them were around Lake Elizabeth, about 35 miles West of Lancaster in the Mojave desert foothills. We had a field guide at the time. There is no doubt, trust me!

There are only two whiptails native to CA, tigris and hyperythrus . I don't think either are parthenogenic. If you have no doubt as to species ID, you're doing a lot better than most field herpers, as the multitude of species that closely resemble each other is overwhelming. Emotion: smile

http://www.montereybay.com/creagrus/CAwhiptails.html

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Nope! :-) I meant California all right! I recognize that ... guide at the time. There is no doubt, trust me!

There are only two whiptails native to CA, tigris and hyperythrus . I don't think either are ... lot better than most field herpers, as the multitude of species that closely resemble each other is overwhelming. :) http://www.montereybay.com/creagrus/CAwhiptails.html

Well, ok, I was just a teenager at the time. ;-)
I'm just going by what the biology proffessor told us on the field trips. He may have been as uninformed as I am!
It's still a cool factoid, but that picture looked a lot like I remember them.
But that was over 20 years ago...
K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...
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No lizards in Massachusetts.

Wow, is that true ? Never been to mass. but I would have figured some type of lizard would be there. No skinks or anything ??? ryan
I'm just going by what the biology proffessor told us on the field trips. He may have been as uninformed as I am!

It's likely. I learned a very important lesson that wasn't in the syllabus when I was in 4th grade a LOT of teachers don't know everything. Emotion: smile My teacher told the class Mount Everest was in Washington, "near Mt St Helens." I told her I thought it was between Nepal and China, and she told me I was wrong. I was humiliated in front of the class. After school, I pointed out Mount Everest to her on a globe and she said "Hmph." Never made the correction to the class, so I guess there are a bunch of people making travel plans to the Pacific Northwest to see the tallest mountain in the world!
It's still a cool factoid, but that picture looked a lot like I remember them.

That's very understandable, since a lot of them all look the same! Emotion: smile Especially in New Mexico and west TX.

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I'm just going by what the biology proffessor told us on the field trips. He may have been as uninformed as I am!

It's likely. I learned a very important lesson that wasn't in the syllabus when I was in 4th grade a LOT ... are a bunch of people making travel plans to the Pacific Northwest to see the tallest mountain in the world!

How very sad...... :-P
People should at least have the decency to admit when they are wrong, chalk it up to education and move on!
Note that I'm not objecting to being corrected here. ;-) I'm learning a LOT! Thanks!
It's still a cool factoid, but that picture looked a lot like I remember them.

That's very understandable, since a lot of them all look the same! Emotion: smile Especially in New Mexico and west TX.

Beautiful little dudes aren't they?
And "Whiptail" is an appropriate name! I don't think I've ever seen anything move so fast!
I've not seen any in this area, not yet anyway. Pam and Randy used to find the large alligator lizards by the river and kept them as pets. They are pretty neat. She also kept a coral snake for awhile but, like me, she was leery of keeping a venemous species. I kept a small rattlesnake myself for about 2 weeks but after nearly getting bitten, I decided it needed to go back out in the wild. I took it out miles from any homes and released it near a good water source.

K.

Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...
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Boards and cinder blocks...

I've done that too! It was rough in the Dark Ages before the pet herp industry really took off! Anybody else keep their first lizard in a coffee can?

I kept my first snake in a glass 10 gallon aquarium. WITHOUT A LID. I think that snake was a pet for all of ten minutes. My dad found it the next morning when he was putting on his pants - the snake was in his pants. What a suprize first thing in the morning.

Luke.
I've used that too. The bungee cords were effective, but not attractive, and duct tape isn't too aesthetically pleasing either.

Boards and cinder blocks... K.

Boards and rusty free weights, plus a few rocks.
For smaller tanks/weaker animals I like those little metal clips on metal screen tops - the "L"-shaped ones, not the curved ones. And, of course, sometimes smaller tanks on top of the corners of big ones. )
Cindy
Anybody else keep their first lizard in a coffee can?

5-gallon milk bucket.
Cindy