Recently one of our lovebirds died, and when the vet did the necropsy she cited a conure-sized beak as the cause of death. We have two green cheek conures, one of whom has been particuraley aggressive lately, and I am certain after seeing him interact with our other birds (two goffins cockatoos and two other lovebirds) that he is the one who killed the lovebird. I want to give him up to an adoption center because I feel it would be unsafe to let him out in our bird community ever again and forcing him to stay locked in his cage for the rest of his life is in my opinion inhumane.

My husband does not want to give him up because he feels he can be rehabilitated. Even if that is the case, this bird will not let me handle him, he only allows my husband to; the problem with this is that my husband plays with him maybe once a week at best so the probability of him being rehabilitated with this little human contact is unlikely. Does anyone know or think that he may be rehabilitated, and if so, what it would take? Thank you so much for any help you may have on this topic.
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Recently one of our lovebirds died, and when the vet did the necropsy she cited a conure-sized beak as the ... and if so, what it would take? Thank you so much for any help you may have on this topic.

Thanks for sharing this awful event. Wonderful as the Pyrruhura Conures are, they are smart, powerful little birds. I'm so sorry for the loss of the Lovebird.
These little Conures can not be trusted to live in the same cage with other species, particularly those such as Budgies and Cockatiels.

Playing on a facility where other birds can keep their distance/get away can usually work with supervision. When a keeper notices aggressive behavior, typically seasonal, the community play should be discontinued until the GCC "gets through it".
If there is any way to let the GCC have his month or so of aggression, he may very well become your good pet once again. But now you know what to watch for in the future.
Mine have their aggressive time for about a month beginning anywhere from January through April, not usually at this time of year.

It shouldn't be necessary to keep him in his cage indefinitely. It's not a matter of rehabilitation; it's more a matter of letting the aggression pass and it will.

Sincerely,
Joanne
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Recently one of our lovebirds died, and when the vet ... much for any help you may have on this topic.

Thanks for sharing this awful event. Wonderful as the Pyrruhura Conures are, they are smart, powerful little birds. I'm so ... cage indefinitely. It's not a matter of rehabilitation; it's more a matter of letting the aggression pass and it will.

Excellent advice from Joanne.
We've been through a half dozen GCC's, for the same issue, and we finally found a male (Rudy) who doesn't seem interested in killing our other birds (three cockatiels and a caique). But we still never allow unsupervised playtime when Rudy is out of his cage.

Our avian vet told us many GCC's go through a "terrible two" phase, and sure enough, Rudy has been more aggressive since he turned two years of age. Apparently this is just a phase he'll grow out of.

When it comes to GCC's finding one that's been hand-raised and hand-fed is extremely important. If the bird has even a little wild blood in it, you can count on far more aggressive behavior than you'd otherwise have.
Recently one of our lovebirds died, and when the vet did the necropsy she cited a conure-sized beak as the ... and if so, what it would take? Thank you so much for any help you may have on this topic.[/nq]Well first off, were the birds caged together? If not, are the birds flighted? I'm kind of surprised that the little Conure did not have some serious wounds also. Normally a LB will go for the feet, and can take off a toe. As to the Conure, you "probably" could get it to let you handle it, but you would have to be willing to work at it. there are different ways to do this. The way "I" did this with a BCC that was wild when I bought him was with gloves.

Now this is highly frowned on by "experts", but it worked for me. I still have those gloves. I look at them and laugh now and then. They are Deer skin gloves made for Cops, very tight fitting, very tough. The right hand has scars all over it from Max. I would wear it, and slowly handle him, he would bite the crap out of the fingers, and of course it had no effect. After a few days, he stopped bothering to bite. Then I started without the glove. When he bit, it was seldom a "all he could" bite, and I responded with a LOUD NO!!!.

He soon learned. Now for years I still had to be careful with him. If he was scared or mad, like a stranger was trying to visit, or took him to the vet, he would latch on and hang on like a pit bull. He only did that a few times, cause I learned to watch him, but the bite would throb for days. Now he no longer is a problem at all. Voice commands alone are fine no matter what, even when I towel him for the Vet. There are other ways to accomplish this, but this is what worked for me.

If you are willing to suffer some bites and take the time, you "may" be able to win the bird over. Obviously the bird should never be allowed to have unsupervised out of the cage time, and of course never caged with another bird.

Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy. Benjamin Franklin
without the glove. When he bit, it was seldom a "all he could" bite, and I responded with a LOUD NO!!!. He soon learned.

Blowing hard into the face often works too.
without the glove. When he bit, it was seldom a "all he could" bite, and I responded with a LOUD NO!!!. He soon learned.

Blowing hard into the face often works too.

That wouldn't work with my black-capped conure, Wesley loves me blowing in his face. A loud "Knock it Off!" does the trick, although Wes doesn't go after the other birds.
Gloria
Ha, a loud Knock it Off would just cause the little beast to clamp down and twist, he was with out mercy! ;0)
He only likes gurls named Gloria, hates men, and I seem to remember him taking a chunk out of your daddy last time I saw them together..

Bob W

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Ha, a loud Knock it Off would just cause the little beast to clamp down and twist, he was with ... I seem to remember him taking a chunk out of your daddy last time I saw them together.. Bob W

*g* He's off and on with Dad, it appears. The last time Dad handled him all was hunky-dory between the two. I can't wait until Sis gets back from Iraq, if you thought he was cuddly with me you should see him with her. I'm Mom, she's Da Hott Babe he wants to impress, big difference!

Gloria
Thank you all for your help. The lovebird and the conure weren't caged together per se, but we have most of the birds (2 goffins, 2 lovebirds,2 GCC) together in a safe bird room where they're allowed to playoutside of their cages. I bird proofed the room so that it wasn't a hazard to them I never thought that they would be a hazard to each other. The lovebirds and the cockatoos get along quite well one of the cockatoos allows one of the lovebirds to preen her on a regular basis. I think I will take your advice with the gloves, though I may have to find a mask of some sort most of the time the GCC goes straight for my face and neck.

I wish this was just a phase, but his aggressiveness towards me has been going on for four months at this point. He is nearly fully flighted at this point, we have been delinquent in getting his wings clipped since I am unable to do it anymore; his flight status, however, hasn't made much of a difference in his behavior even though the experts say it should. Thanks again.
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