I was given an adult and two baby guinea pigs for feeders. They were DOAs from shipping (from a good source) and immediately frozen.

Can an adult male boa, about 7 feet long, eat an adult one? My female is younger and has a smaller head, so I'm thinking of giving it to him. Are they as good as rats for food? It looks like I may have a steady source. I got another baby this morning and gave it to an adult corn.

Ever walked into a room with 150 guinea pigs? It's wild! They come in some pretty whacked out breeds.
Jennifer
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Can an adult male boa, about 7 feet long, eat an adult one? Myfemale is younger and has a smaller head, so I'm thinking of giving it tohim. Are they as good as rats for food?

I have no idea about the nutritional benefits compared to rats, but a 7 foot Boa should have no problem with any Guinea Pig. I would think they are an acceptable food item if you have a steady supply. I have used them in the past with no problems. I would stick with the short haired varieties as much as possible tho. Bad to have a Boa with a hairball..lol. Maybe you could feed rats one feeding, and Guinea Pigs the next. One possible problem would be the snake getting accustomed to Guinea Pigs, and refusing rats later on.
By the way, do you have any pictures of your Boas?

Roger
I was given an adult and two baby guinea pigs for feeders. They were DOAs from shipping (from a good ... like I may have a steady source. I got another baby this morning and gave it to an adult corn.

They are just as good nutritionally as rats, a snake should be able to live on Guinea pigs just fine, if it can swallow them. One thing to worry about - adult Guinea pigs have very large heads for their bodies. Although a reptile might be able to swallow a rat of similar size, the enlarged cranium of the cavies can makie it difficult for the snake to eat its dinner. Obviously, the larger the size difference between the snake and the Gpig, the less the problem.
You won't have to worry about it, but cavies also have very thick skin. After my monitors give up trying to cram the head down their gullets, they try ripping the Gpig corpse to shreds with their claws. This doesn't work either. Then they just abandon their prospective dinner somewhere in the cage to rot, all to often under the heat lamps. It makes for a very ... aromatic reptile room the next day. I noticed that salvator water monitors can expand their jaws a lot more than argus monitors - medium sized salvators can swallow adult cavies that much larger arguses cannot handle.
One other thing to think about. A friend of mine once tried to feed a Burmese python a Guinea pig. The burm was used to eating rabbits. It just ignored the Gpig, not recognizing it as food.
Ever walked into a room with 150 guinea pigs? It's wild! They come in some pretty whacked out breeds.

My wife breeds these things. She once had a couple hundred at a time (although fortunately its down to about a dozen, now). It is interesting hearing about the problems all the wierd breeds have (teddies have hair that curls into the eyes when young, long hairs have massive tangle problems, abyssinians are jumpy, high strung biters, trying to preed some color/pattern combos to other color/pattern combos leads to lethal double recesive gene combos, etc.).

Luke
They're not great food and shouldn't be fed regularly as they are quite fatty
They're not great food and shouldn't be fed >regularly as they are quite fatty

I concur. They tend to be regurgitated more often than any other food mammal.
However, if fresh or freshly frozen they are excellent for putting some extra weight on a breeding female boid.
Cheers,
Kurt
I have no idea about the nutritional benefits compared to rats, but a 7 foot Boa should have no problem ... to Guinea Pigs, and refusing rats later on. By the way, do you have any pictures of your Boas? Roger

Thanks! I'm not sure they'd ever refuse a meal, thay have a real strong feeding response. :-/ I don't have any pics of my girl up at the moment, but here's the boy:

(This pic was taken at a show put on by PNHS.) They're Argentines. The female is somewhat lighter in color, more chocolates than just black and white.
Jennifer
They are just as good nutritionally as rats, a snake should be able to live on Guinea pigs just fine, ... to eat its dinner. Obviously, the larger the size difference between the snake and the Gpig, the less the problem.

Yeah, I fed a newborn to one of my adult corns. It took him a while to get past the head. Heck, it took him a while to figure out what was the head! But once he did that it went down quick.
You won't have to worry about it, but cavies also have very thick skin. After my monitors give up trying ... a lot more than argus monitors - medium sized salvators can swallow adult cavies that much larger arguses cannot handle.

I remember you talking about this before. I wonder if the big tegus are predators of them?
One other thing to think about. A friend of mine once tried to feed a Burmese python a Guinea pig. The burm was used to eating rabbits. It just ignored the Gpig, not recognizing it as food.

I'll have to see what the boas think about them. I brought home two more today, females that had died from birthing problems. They really don't ship well when pregnant. We've lost almost all the babies born this week. Hopefully they will acclimate soon and be healthy again. We're duplicating their previous diet and temperature. Supposedly we'll be having 400 or so breeders eventually. I was joking with my boss about moving in my carpet python and hanging a sign on her cage saying "Official Eater of Guinea Pigs" and he told me to go for it! I'm not going to, at this rate she'd get obese. But I may never have to buy rats again. I hope not, because it's sad to see the cute little pigs in the freezer.
My wife breeds these things. She once had a couple hundred at a time (although fortunately its down to about ... strung biters, trying to preed some color/pattern combos to other color/pattern combos leads to lethal double recesive gene combos, etc.).

lol I was helping with them tonight and noticed that the abys are flighty little buggers, and one young one was a real bully. We also have a Peruvian female that beats up on any other female put in her bin. They chatter their teeth when mad! We were sexing some and they get this funny look on their faces when you're pretty much feeling them up. Thankfully I haven't ran into a biter yet. I have vivid memories of my prairie dog bites. And yeah, they're sorting them carefully so we don't get lethal genes. They're pretty cool critters. I may end up with one, myself. :-)
Jennifer
They're not great food and shouldn't be fed >regularly as they are quite fatty

I concur. They tend to be regurgitated more often than any other food mammal. However, if fresh or freshly frozen they are excellent for putting some extra weight on a breeding female boid. Cheers, Kurt

Thanks!
Jennifer
They're not great food and shouldn't be fed regularly as they are quite fatty

Being that the meat is eaten by humans in many cases, I find that hard to believe. I would think that the main reason for problems would be the enormous amounts of hair. A friend of mine had a Rock Python which ate Guinea Pigs regularly...but he would shave them first. He came to this conclusion because the first ones he fed seemed to cause problems from the hair. Once he shaved them, there seemed to be no problems. I guess this might depend on the snake as well. My experience with this subject is only second-hand, through the experiences of my friend, but there it is for what it is worth.
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