Hello,
I'd appreciate some input from the group on how you folks provide heat for your herp rooms.
I probably have a substantially different set-up from most of you, but any suggestions are welcomed.
I live in Alabama, so ordinarily; we don't have that cold of winters. I live in a very moderate house, which I primarily heat with a propane infrared heater, located in my living room. My snake room is a spare bedroom, which I heat with an electric "Holmes" thermostatically controlled heater. I heat this room totally independent from the rest of the house, as I keep it closed off. Since I have lived here, I've only had one heater malfunction, after about four years of use; and fortunately, I was at home when this happened.
My question is "How often should I change out ceramic heaters?" I don't want the heater to malfunction, causing possible sickness, or even death to my herps; nor do I want to replace it any more often than I have to. I guess that's the Jack Benny in me. I do have one of those digital thermometers, which sound an alarm when the temp drops below a certain point; but I'm not always home to hear it.
I'd appreciate any suggestions from anyone having a setup similar to mine.
Thanks for any input, and stay safe,
KBC
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I'd appreciate some input from the group on how you folks provide heat for your herp rooms. I probably have ... but I'm not always home to hear it. I'd appreciate any suggestions from anyone having a setup similar to mine.

You might want to try 2 thermostats set up in series. The built in thermostat of the ceramic heater (assuming there is one) set up at the desired temperature, and a second thermostat set at a slightly higher temp. If the ceramic heater fails the other thermostat will shut off the heat before it goes to far above range. The odds of both failing at the same time are much smaller than the odds of one failing at a time. You could test the second one periodically to make sure it is working.

To Email me remove All doubt.
Hello there. After reading your post I'm a little confused. Are you saying it as the electric heater that malfunctioned? Also how many square foot is your herp room? I think your best option would be to heat the room with a properly sized blue flame propane heater. Being a vent-free heater it will also produce moisture as a by product of the combustion process. If the room is bedroom sized 10K BTU should heat it just fine, also that is a law pertaining to sleeping quarters of humans.
Just get a thermostatically controlled unit. With it you wont have to worry about power outages either. The infrared heaters are good, but they tend to "throw" the heat straight out, while the blue flame will heat the air. A small ceiling fan wouldn't hurt to keep the room at the same temperature. And yes I work in the propane business, but also heat my room this way. It would only be a problem if you have desert reptiles as like I said the heater will put out moisture.

Kenneth
And yes I work in the propane business, but also heat my room this way.

Heh, do you sell propane and propane accessories? I'm a King of the Hill fan, can't you tell?
What exactly to you do in the propane business?
Well, I was a bit lucky in my old place. I had electric baseboard heaters that I could set to the desired temp and they would kick on and off as needed. The room was kept around 80° F all the time and the basking lights provided additional daytime heat. Needless to say, I had devastating electic bills.
At my new place, I use an electric space heater which kicks on at night via a timer.
J.
Hello there. After reading your post I'm a little confused. Are you saying it as the electric heater that malfunctioned? ... flame propane heater. Being a vent-free heater it will also produce moisture as a by product of the combustion process.

Yes, and it could also produce carbon monoxide, a poisonous gas. These heaters are designed to be used in very well ventilated areas. I would not use a propane heater. Too risky.

To Email me remove All doubt.
Hello,
I certainly appreciate the responses to my post; but perhaps I was vague in my question. My concern was that heater itself would wear out, causing it to stop working altogether. I hadn't even considered the possibiltiy of the thermostat malfunctioning; but that too, is now a legitimate concern. I have been using a heater for four winters, then replacing it with a new one. Only once have I had one to fail, and fortunately; I was home; and awake to discover the problem in time. I don't really want to replace heaters yearly; although they do run 24/7 during Nov.-Feb.
My snake room is small; probably 10'x10'. I do have an infrared propane heater in the room, but use it for emergencies only. In Alabama, we seldom have extended power outages during the winter months, but after the blizzard of '93(?), I decided to have a back up plan. I was hesitant to use it consistently, as I was concerned with the lack of ventilation; and the possiblility of CO2 buildup, as another poster has mentioned.
Even if I do replace the ceramic heater on a yearly basis, I'm still concerned that it may cease working in my absence; and allow the room temperature to drop to a deadly level.
Stay safe,
KBC
Even if I do replace the ceramic heater on a yearly basis, I'm still concerned that it may cease working in my absence; and allow the room temperature to drop to a deadly level. Stay safe, KBC

How well insulated is the room? The only suggestion I can come up with right now is to insulate the windows and doors, so that any heat loss will occur slowly. And if you have basking lamps or other heating devices on the tanks, it will also slow the loss.
Jennifer
Heh, do you sell propane and propane accessories? I'm a King of the Hill fan, can't you tell? What exactly to you do in the propane business?

Sell, install and service heaters and propane systems. So I am Hank Hill In a sense.
Kenneth
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