Hi,
I've got a 4 1/2 year old adult corn snake who is now refusing to eat. He's been fed frozen (thawed) mice and now rats since he was a baby, and now has been really finicky with eating. I've tried 3-4 times to get him to eat and finally he will eat, but then he'll go 3-4 rats again without eating. This is starting to cost a lot of money in wasted rats. It'll be 4 weeks since he's eaten tomorrow.
He seems to come out and sniff around the rat, but then doesn't eat. This was never a problem for 4 1/2 years, but now seems to be. Any ideas?

Also, does anyone have any thawing tips? What I do is leave the rat in the bag, put it in warm water and then wait until the rat is soft, warm, and supple before putting it in the tank. Anything else I should be doing?

thanks in advance!!!
Hi, I've got a 4 1/2 year old adult corn snake who is now refusing to eat. He's been fed ... This is starting to cost a lot of money in wasted rats. It'll be 4 weeks since he's eaten tomorrow.

This is the time of year that in the wild he would be bruminating (hibernating). He is now a mature boy snake and his job is to bruminate a while, and then go look for girl snakes. Don't worry about the not eating; he is fine and will be hunting again in a month or so.

Rats may be bigger than he wants, too...mine is 6' but still eats a regular adult mouse a week. The large ones seem to take a bit more doing to get down, so I usually get the medium size ones.

If he decides not to eat, we throw the mouse to our female kingsnake, The Garbage Disposal. Emotion: smile
Also, does anyone have any thawing tips? What I do is leave the rat in the bag, put it in warm water and then wait until the rat is soft, warm, and supple before putting it in the tank. Anything else I should be doing?

You are doing fine with the thawing; the rat doesn't get wet, does it? We keep our container on the mantel and the heat coming up from the propane stove thaws the mice well. If they don't seem warm enough, we set the container in front of the stove for just a few minutes until the mice are warm to the touch.
Not that a cold mouse would bother The Garbage Disposal...I'm convinced she'd even eat a still-frozen one.
Jeannie
thawing slowly works best, rodent doesn't get mushy. we thaw in bag at room temp, then set the mouse near the heat lamp to warm up a bit before feeding. especially do not thaw in microwave, they get real mushy and can rupture when snake is eating. it's not good for the insides to be hanging out when the snake eats. also, temp is important. cornsnakes like temps about 76- 82 at the warm end of cage, with higher-moderate humidity. the brumating issue has already been covered in other posts
cheers, larry