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Thanks for all your advice everyone - I do eventually want the puppy to sleep with us but only once ... be mean or cruel. I love the little guy so much and I just want to do the right thing.

If you're a light sleeper, you can try allowing him to sleep on the bed with you. When he gets restless, you get up and take him out.
I've been hearing so many conflicting things and I'm so confused. I heard that if you approach them in the ... you're rewarding them crying... other people say this comforts them.. I think it's me that needs to be trained, truthfully!

LOL - you got it. :} It's always the owner who needs to be trained.

Yes, if he is crying for attention, you will be reinforcing the crying by paying him the attention. Only give him attention - even eye contact - when he's quiet. Otherwise he will learn to manipulate you with the crying. :}
The bedroom is very small and it would be hard to crate him in there. I could figure something out ... out? If I do this temporarily, will it be harder down the road for him to sleep in another room?

It's different for every dog. Some very young pups can sleep through the whole night without having to eliminate. Others need to go out every couple of hours. He should let you know. My last puppy had to go out 2-5 times a night for the first couple of months, which left me brain-dead from lack of sleep. :}

Dogs are creatures of habit - big time. If you create a habit of sleeping in your room, or on your bed, it's most likely that is where he will always choose to sleep.
PetsMart Pet Trainer
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i take it your dogs don't try to eat your cats while you sleep?

Not now that the cats have learned to stay out of the dogs' preferred sleeping places. Dogs at the foot of the bed (I have to sleep diagonally), cats up near my head.
The dogs and the cats generally get along very well. Part of it was luck and part of it was Moby George laying down the law. (Outside is a different story, though.)

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Not now that the cats have learned to stay out of the dogs' preferred sleeping places. Dogs at the foot ... it was luck and part of it was Moby George laying down the law. (Outside is a different story, though.)

Lola can hang out with the cats ok, i think it's because we got her as a small puppy and the cats gave her a good thwack on the nose when she got too obnoxious. before we got Manu, it wasn't unusual to see Lola and Mo-kitty sleeping back to back on the couch.
but Manu is big and scary and very interested in sniffing kitties. he's cornered them a couple times, and all he does is stick his nose in their fur to sniff deeply. but they don't like that too much, and usually freak out completely when they see him. so now the cats live upstairs (where the bedroom and office are), and the dogs live downstairs. we use an invisible fence on the landing of the stairway, so the dogs can't go up and bother the cats. it took about a week before the cats figured this out, and now they sit, just past the "line", and groom themselves, while Manu sits and whines at them.
i'd like them to be able to come down and hang out with us, but i'm not too keen on letting Manu "get used to them" on his own, and i don't know if it's possible to teach him not to bug them.
-kelly
Hi Ana,When I got my new puppy almost 3 years ago, I asked the exact same questions that you are asking. We had crated him in the laundry room for various reasons (none of which I can remember anymore) and he cried and cried. Anyway, every single person on this list suggested that we keep his crate in the bedroom, and when we moved him, his crying stopped that night. He just needed to know he wasn't alone. I kept his crate right next to my bed the first week (I did comfort him, though.

His behaviour didn't react in such a way that he thought he was getting a reward), then gradually moved it to a corner of the bedroom, and eventually moved it out into the living room (where it is now). We probably had him in our bedroom for, oh, I'd say a couple of months. I can't really remember, but it was definitely not too short a time, but not too long either. Like others have said, it was pretty gradual.The best thing I learned about night time potty training (not that you asked, but I was so impressed with it!), is to quitely and calmly take them outside when they have to go. Do not react in any way, don't look them in the eye, no playing, no scritches until they go to the bathroom. Then, high praise (of course), some scritching and 'good dog' attitude and then quietly and calmly back in the crate. This helped so much for him settling down at night.

We did this in the daytime too, except after he went potty, MAJOR praise and LOTS of playtime. It taught him to go potty first really fast, then he got to play. And he does that to this day. Plus every time he went potty, I told him "go potty" and now he will almost always go on command. Unfortunately, I didn't do that for #2. I can't get him to hurry up for that one! :-)
Good luck, you are in for a treat with you puppy. :-)

Warm Regards,
Lisa
How many cats do u have? I have 3 dogs & 5 cats
I wouldn't think of geting a crate for my dogs even if they were puppies. Back in 1994 we had 2 Lab/Shep-Grt.Dane mixed breed puppies & they stayed in our bedroom,in bed with us or if they wanted to they went under our bed. When that happened they both got on their backs and moved their legs in a bicycle motion. Needless to say our mattress went up & down,up & down with us on it.We wanted our dogs with us all the time. They never had to be put in another room for punisment either & for some reason if they had to go in another room for safety reasons? Like another room being painted? Well one of us stayed with them so they wouldn't feel alone
I wouldn't think of geting a crate for my dogs even if they were puppies.

I used to feel the same way. Then again, I used to believe that it was normal for a dog to take 3-4 months to potty train.
I was reluctant to get a crate for my BC, even though her trainer strongly recommended it. She was potty trained in 4 days (I was off work, she slept in the bed, so it was 24/7 training). When I went back to work, she had the run of the house alone for 4 hours at a time.
Somewhere around 6 months of age, I came home one day to find literally thousands of dollars worth of damage to my apartment. And the damage continued. I couldn't puppy-proof a room, because she'd eat floors, walls, baseboards, etc.
So I got the crate. In about a week, she was running voluntarily into her crate when I told her "go to your room," eagerly awaiting her frozen kong treat.
Not only did the damage stop, but I realized that she was far less antsy and wound-up when I got home than she had been when she had to "guard the whole house" in my absence. Much more secure.
I am now a steadfast supporter of crates as the best way to prevent damage and potty mistakes (thereby not creating bad habits from the get-go), AND to keep a dog from feeling anxiety when we're not with them.

It's not the confinement they don't like. Being denning animals, they like small enclosed spaces - helps them feel safe. What they don't like is being separated from us.
Crates are NOT for our "convenience." In other words, using them so that we can have time away from the dog when we're home is a misuse, IMHO. When we're home, we should be interacting with our dogs.
But when we're not home, or we're sleeping, a crate is the very best way to keep a dog safe, secure, and on the right track to learning "house rules."

PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
I wouldn't think of geting a crate for my dogs even if they were puppies. Back in 1994 we had ... for safety reasons? Like another room being painted? Well one of us stayed with them so they wouldn't feel alone

I do fully reccomend the use of crates. It's awesome when you have puppies that are as well-behaved as yours were, and I'm sure my current puppy would be the same if I'd chosen to not use the crate. However, he does need to be solidly, 100% comfortable in his crate as he is a show dog and I do prefer to have the monster-child in a crate at shows. He tends to get overly wound up otherwise and it causes him to boingity in the ring.

However, my older Lab, Bridget, was a monster in her day. She was a rescue of sorts I bought her, but she would've ended up in the pound if I hadn't. She would literally destroy the house, we'd find the trash all over (every trashcan in the house), she'd de-stuff toys, kill anything she could get hold of. It was pretty aweful. We had to crate her consistantly for about
3 years, but it did improve and she is now 100% reliable. The old fart iseven reliable off-lead outside, which when I bought her I'd never expected.

Emily Carroll
Fluttervale Labradors: www.fluttervale.com
CPG: www.geocities.com/cyberpetgame/
It's not the confinement they don't like.

BWAHHAHAHAHHAHAHAA!!
thanks for speaking on behalf of millions of dogs
who go crazy when you lock them in a box.
Being denning animals,

denning animals are never confined.
they like small enclosed spaces - helps them feel safe. What they don't like is being separated from us. Crates ... words, using them so that we can have time away from the dog when we're home is a misuse, IMHO.

waitaminnit, that's what shelly uses is for on
hattie, when hattie is being a PITA. Shelly's mileage may vary, and she's not going to like you saying that.
When we're
home, we should be interacting with our dogs. But when we're not home, or we're sleeping, a crate is the very best way to keep a dog safe, secure, and on the right track to learning "house rules."

a dog learns nothing in a cage, except that he can't get out.
I hope that heelps.
this is michael
reporting live...
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http://dogtv.com/cage.rm
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