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Most cities have an active Dog Obedience club, and they ... don't have to join the club to take the lessons).

Thanks, Theresa! I looked and there's a club very near me and they have new classes starting in about a month. I'm sending in our application tomorrow.

Great! I really enjoyed the classes I took with Harlan. It was a lot of fun meeting other people and dogs, and it was a great bonding time for us. And everyone else in the group was too worried about how silly they looked to worry about how silly Harlan and I looked!

Best of luck, and let us know how it goes.
Most cities have an active Dog Obedience club, and they often offer inexpensive lessons.

I have an older dog (~9 years, but still our youngest) who I found full-grown in a nature preserve. She's much less comfortable in social situations than our other dogs.
I finally decided to get her in some formal training by trying agility at our local club. It's been wonderful for us. She's very focused on me and that works well for agility. Also, there are other dogs running around but they're generally under control and she doesn't feel the need to protect me from them. I've been surprised at how readily she simply ignores the other dogs and concentrates on her tasks.

Agility training is quite a bit different than basic training socially. It might work well for this situation.
kyler
I finally decided to get her in some formal training by trying agility at our local club. It's been wonderful ... her tasks. Agility training is quite a bit different than basic training socially. It might work well for this situation.

That's a pretty good point. Agility, when it's done right, is very reinforcing for the dog, and helps the dog learn to ignore outside "distractions" which include other dogs, etc.
Cala isn't dog aggressive but she doesn't really care for other dogs right in her space. But for agility nothing else exists but her, me, and the equipment. Nuclear war could be happening the next ring away and she wouldn't care.
Agility training is quite a bit different than basic training socially.

I call it "real life obedience." Your dog learns to behave well off leash, respond to your body language, and is given the opportunity to become well-socialised with all sorts of dogs and people in a stimulating atmosphere.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
Agility training is quite a bit different than basic training socially. It might work well for this situation.

That's a pretty good point. Agility, when it's done right, is very reinforcing for the dog, and helps the dog learn to ignore outside "distractions" which include other dogs, etc.

Good point. I've seen many shy dogs gain a great deal of confidence after only a few classes.
Cala isn't dog aggressive but she doesn't really care for other dogs right in her space. But for agility nothing else exists but her, me, and the equipment. Nuclear war could be happening the next ring away and she wouldn't care.

Same with Rocky and Friday - we've run under judges who are very good friends and who my dogs adore. Outside of agility, they go crazy when they see these people; inside the ring, my dogs don't even glance at them.
That great jumpers run that I mentioned in rpd.activities? One of the people I train with was sitting inside the ring filming the run and Friday didn't pay him a lick of attention.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
Most cities have an active Dog Obedience club, and they often offer inexpensive lessons.

I have an older dog (~9 years, but still our youngest) who I found full-grown in a nature preserve. She's ... tasks. Agility training is quite a bit different than basic training socially. It might work well for this situation. kyler

well, we're signed up for the obediance class that starts in a few weeks. in the meantime, I'm going to take some of the other suggestions here and try to get him into some more low-key, controllable social situations and work on some more obediance stuff here at home too.
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Be extremely proactive and aware of your surroundings and stop it before it happens. Distract and reward him before he gets a chance to lunge and bark.

Once it happens all you can really do is move your dog away from the situation and reward him when he stops. If you yell at him you are actually just joining in on what he's doing. And if you punish him than dogs/people coming near him means bad things happen to him.
Lauralyn
My agility dogs:
Cheyenne MXJ MX, AAD
Shylo MXJ MX, AAD
Lakota - the crazy BC!
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