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Long, lean and leggy. A number of them remind me of Tasha.

She's pretty! She looks to me like a racing line dog, too, but not Seppala-type. Emmett is similar, although more ... remember and come up with a URL. That stance and headset make her look like Queen Of All She Surveys.

Oh, she is. She's a very confident dog, and very alpha, but she's a very fair and tolerant alpha. She's a great dog; even non-Siberian people love her. She has a knack for making everyone who comes here think she wants to go home with them. Heck, maybe she does.
The uploading problems you had may have been due to the size of the files - they're huge. I shrunk it down to about 1/40 of its original size (um, the file, not the photo; that I reduced by 1/2) and uploaded it to

Thanks. I discovered the hugeness a bit too late, and I'm sure that's the reason I couldn't upload the files to Yahoo. My next project is to learn to edit photos.
BTW, are your huskies shedding? Mine started a second halfhearted blow in late fall, which is unusual for them - - they usually just blow once, in late summer. Now they're all raggedy, which seems strange with the weather cold and snowy.
Mustang Sally
Hi Melinda, I could understand maybe if it were bitches but not dogs. Our local RSPCA neuters all males before ... money. The dogs are usually mongrels and x breeds so I doubt if people would be tempted to breed them.

People don't have to actually breed dogs for them to breed, they do it on their own, too. grin* A neutered male is more likely to want to stay home and even if it does get out, it can't do anything. As a preventitive measure, it's money well spent in *all cases.

Elizabeth

*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~* The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate and expand her sense of actual possibilities. Adrienne Rich *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Hi Melinda, I could understand maybe if it were bitches ... I doubt if people would be tempted to breed them.

People don't have to actually breed dogs for them to breed, they do it on their own, too. grin* A ... if it does get out, it can't do anything. As a preventitive measure, it's money well spent in *all cases.

Except the owner, who will have a dog with a shorter life span, and a greater likelihood for prostate cancer.
NEUTERED MALES HAVE THE SHORTEST LIFE SPAN OF ALL TYPES OF DOGS STUDIED Longevity of British breeds of dog and its relationships with sex, size, cardiovascular variables and disease
(British study of lifespan averages for dog breeds) source: A.R. Michell
Veterinary Record vol 145 no 22 November 27 1999
starts p 625, 5 pages long
A British study has recorded links between dog breeds and longevity, using a questionnaire covering 3,126 dogs. The dogs lived for a mean average of 11 years 1 month, rising to 12 years 8 months for those dying of natural causes, while the median average was 12 years for all dogs, and 13 years 2 months for dogs dying of natural causes. One dog survived to 22 years, and 8% of dogs survived to be over 15 years, while 26% reached 14 years or more. Neutered bitches lived longest of dogs dying of all causes, though entire bitches lived longest of dogs dying of natural causes, with neutered males having the shortest lifespan in each category.
Jack Russells and Staffordshire bull terriers were overrepresented among dogs killed in traffic accidents, with such accidents accounting for
3.2% of all deaths. Corgis, Staffordshire bull terriers, and weimaranerswere overrepresented among those euthanased due to behavioural problems, with German shepherds and rottweilers underrepresented. Only 2% of all the deaths were due to euthanasia as a result of behavioural problems. Irish wolfhounds, rottweilers, and Afghan hounds were overrepresented among dogs dying of cancer, in descending order, while beagles, Cavalier King Charles spaniels, and Dachshunds were underrepresented, in ascending order, with no cases at all recorded for the beagles. Cancer was the most common cause of death in the groups as a whole, accounting for 44.9% of deaths of entire males, 34.7% of deaths of neutered males,
50.2% of deaths of entire females, and 39.6% of deaths of neuteredfemales. Neutered dogs were more likely than entire dogs to die of heart disease, which accounted for 34.7% of deaths in neutered males compared to 22.5% for entire males, and 23.6% of deaths of neutered females compared to 20.3% of entire females.
Breeds vary greatly in terms of longevity. Breeds recorded as having a median age at death of 14 years or over were Bedlington terriers, miniature dachshunds, miniature poodles, Tibetan terriers, toy poodles, and whippets. Breeds with a median age at death of between 13.0 - 13.9 years were beagles, border collies, border terriers, Cairn terriers, chihuahuas, chow chows, collies, cross-breeds, dalmations, greyhounds, Jack Russells, Pekineses, Shetland sheepdogs, shi-tzus, English springer spaniels, and wire-haired fox terriers. Breeds with a median age at death of 12.0 - 12.9 years included golden retrievers, labrador retrievers, rough collies, West Highland white terriers, and Yorkshire terriers. Cocker spaniels, Irish setters and old English sheepdogs were in the 11.0 - 11.9 year range, and boxers, cavalier King Charles spaniels, German shepherds and Staffordshire bull terriers in the
10.0 - 10.9 year range, while deerhounds, dobermanns, flat-coatedretrievers, Lhasa apsos, Rhodesian ridgebacks and rottweilers were in the 9.0 - 9.9 range. Breeds with a median age at death of under nine years were Bernese mountain dogs, bulldogs, bullmastiffs, great danes, Irish wolfhounds, miniature schnauzers and St Bernards. There does not appear to be a link between blood pressure, heart rate, and longevity.

There have been studies carried out in other countries of breeds and longevity, and there are both similarities and differences with this British study. Euthanasia for behavioural problems is more common in the US. Data based on national populations show breed differences. A study of Swedish dogs also found Irish wolfhounds and boxers to be vulnerable to cancers, though the Swedish study found greyhounds and some other breeds more vulnerable than did this British study. DO,HD
NEUTERED MALES have the HIGHEST RATE FOR PROSTATE CANCER Canine prostate carcinoma: epidemiological evidence of an increased risk in castrated dogs.
Teske E, Naan EC, van Dijk EM, Van Garderen E, Schalken JA.

Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.154, 3508 TD, Utrecht, The NetherlandsThe present retrospective study investigated the frequency of prostate carcinoma (PCA) among prostate abnormalities in dogs and determined whether castration influences the incidence of PCA in dogs. During the years 1993-1998, 15363 male dogs were admitted to the Utrecht University Clinic of Companion Animals, and of these dogs 225 were diagnosed with prostatic disease. In addition, another 206 male dogs were diagnosed as having prostatic disease based on cytologic examination of aspiration biopsies submitted by referring veterinarians.

Benign prostatic hyperplasia was diagnosed in 246 dogs (57.1%), prostatitis in 83 dogs (19.3%), and PCA in 56 dogs (13%). Dogs with PCA were significantly older (mean age=9.9 years) than dogs with other prostatic diseases (mean age=8.4 years). The Bouvier des Flandres breed had an increased risk (odds ratio (OR)=8.44; 95% CI 4.38-16.1) of having PCA. Castration (26/56) increased the risk (OR=4.34; 95% CI 2.48-7.62) of PCA. The mean age at diagnosis of PCA in castrated dogs and in intact male dogs was not significantly different.

The interval between castration and onset of prostatic problems was highly variable, suggesting that castration does not initiate the development of PCA in the dog, but it does favour tumor progression.

Any questions, Doc?
this is michael
reporting live...
http://dogtv.com
Oh, she is. She's a very confident dog, and very alpha, but she's a very fair and tolerant alpha. She's ... a knack for making everyone who comes here think she wants to go home with them. Heck, maybe she does.

Somebody who does a lot of fostering once posted to Sibernet about forming these deep bonds with her foster dogs - soulmates 4ever - and then consistently having the experience of turning a dog over to its new owners, the dog jumps in the new owner's car and never looks back.
BTW, are your huskies shedding? Mine started a second halfhearted blow in late fall, which is unusual for them - - they usually just blow once, in late summer. Now they're all raggedy, which seems strange with the weather cold and snowy.

Mine have conspired to all blow coat twice a year with no two shedding at the same time. It's pretty maddening. Image is just finishing up now. She doesn't have much of an undercoat to start with and I've been a little concerned about her in the deep cold we've had, but she's been fine.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

The Republican-controlled Senate blocked 114 of Bill Clinton's judicial nominees
People don't have to actually breed dogs for them to ... a preventitive measure, it's money well spent in all cases.

Except the owner, who will have a dog with a shorter life span, and a greater likelihood for prostate cancer.

If you read your own cited article carefully, you'll see that neutered males in the study were less likely to die of cancer than intact males, and indeed, any vet will tell you that an intact male is at greater risk for testicular (duh!) and prostate cancer.
Elizabeth (whose own neutered ACS lived to be 17+)
NEUTERED MALES HAVE THE SHORTEST LIFE SPAN OF ALL TYPES OF DOGS STUDIED Longevity of British breeds of dog ... PCA in the dog, but it does favour tumor progression. Any questions, Doc? this is michael reporting live... http://dogtv.com

Elizabeth

*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~* The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate and expand her sense of actual possibilities. Adrienne Rich *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Except the owner, who will have a dog with a shorter life span, and a greater likelihood for prostate cancer.

If you read your own cited article carefully, you'll see that neutered males in the study were less likely to die of cancer than intact males,

"Castration
(26/56) increased the risk (OR=4.34; 95% CI 2.48-7.62) of PCA."
"Canine prostate carcinoma: epidemiological evidence of an increased risk in castrated dogs."
"Neutered bitches lived longest of dogs dying
of all causes, though entire bitches lived longest of dogs dying of natural causes, with neutered males having the shortest lifespan in each category."
This is what I read. Do you have any problems reading it? Or are you so convinced that you are right in Spay and Neuter Naziing, that the truth and the facts are of little concern to you?
I strongly suspect it is the latter. Plus, if you
are a vet, naturally you have a financial incentive in being a hoodwinking/bamboozling spay/neuter nazi.

Other than that, I'm SHORE you are a nice person
and a wonderful dog lover.
this is michael
reporting live...
http://dogtv.com
I could understand maybe if it were bitches but not ... so Idoubt if people would be tempted to breed them.

You misunderstand. They require all of the dogs I already have to be speutered.

Hi Melinda,
I did know what you meant. Thr first sentence still applies. I think if you have an unspeyed *** (unless you are a breeder or show your dogs) then it's irresponsible to have the risk of unwanted puppies. As yet , most average dog owners don't neuter their males (Brit men have a thing about it,) and I don't think that rescues/shelters would consider it irresponsible not to neuter but that may change.
I was rambling on about the RSPCA because I recently adopted Dibby and I don't know why they bothered to neuter him but reading my post again, it does look like I'm referring to the rescue dogs and not your own.
Alison
I was rambling on about the RSPCA because I recently adopted Dibby and I don't know why they bothered to neuter him but reading my post again, it does look like I'm referring to the rescue dogs and not your own.

They bothered to neuter him so that if he gets loose, he can't create an unwanted litter with an unspayed *** before you get him back. Most shelters are primarily concerned with the comfort of existing strays and with lowering the likelihood of future strays. It's also far easier to neuter a male than it is to spay a *** under normal circumstances.

Elizabeth

*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~* The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate and expand her sense of actual possibilities. Adrienne Rich *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
If you read your own cited article carefully, you'll see ... were less likely to die of cancer than intact males,

"Castration (26/56) increased the risk (OR=4.34; 95% CI 2.48-7.62) of PCA." "Canine prostate carcinoma: epidemiological evidence of an increased risk in castrated dogs."

Have you ever actually known a dog to die of prostate cancer? The incidence of this disease is ridiculously low.
"Neutered bitches lived longest of dogs dying of all causes, though entire bitches lived longest of dogs dying of natural causes, with neutered males having the shortest lifespan in each category." This is what I read. Do you have any problems reading it?

I had no problem reading it. I also read this: "Cancer was the most common cause of death in the groups as a whole, accounting for 44.9% of deaths of entire males, 34.7% of deaths of neutered males,
50.2% of deaths of entire females, and 39.6% of deaths of neuteredfemales."
and this: "The interval between castration and onset of prostatic problems was highly variable, suggesting that castration does not initiate the development of PCA in the dog, but it does favour tumor progression."
Do you have citations for further research into the matter, or did you stop once you found the study that supported the opinion you wanted to hear?

Oh, and perhaps you missed this commentary on your cited study: "COMMENTARY: This article supports previous studies showing BPH as the most common prostate disease in dogs; that prostate carcinoma is relatively rare; and that the prevalence of prostate carcinoma is higher in castrated dogs than in intact dogs. The age of castration had no effect on the age at which the tumor was diagnosed. Because prostate carcinoma is so rare in both intact and neutered dogs, this should not be a deterrent to castration. Prostate carcinoma is seen only in dogs older than 6 years. When prostate disease is diagnosed in castrated dogs, the probability of cancer is very high. - David F. Senior, BVSc, Diplomate ACVIM & ECVIM"
Or are you so convinced that you are right in Spay and Neuter Naziing, that the truth and the facts are of little concern to you?

Someone asked why shelters neuter, I answered, and I'm a Spay and Neuter Nazi? How do you get to that conclusion? I never said that all dogs should be neutered, I simply said that it's a good way to prevent unwanted litters.
I strongly suspect it is the latter. Plus, if you are a vet, naturally you have a financial incentive in being a hoodwinking/bamboozling spay/neuter nazi.

I'm not a vet. I worked at an animal shelter in a former life, however, and I see what the result is when people let their unaltered animals roam free. It seems to me that spaying and neutering is a reasonable solution to the problem that allows millions of animals to be homeless and to end up destroyed each year.
Other than that, I'm SHORE you are a nice person and a wonderful dog lover.

Whereas I can tell from the tone of your post that you are neither a nice person nor a wonderful dog lover.
Elizabeth

*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~* The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate and expand her sense of actual possibilities. Adrienne Rich *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
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