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For example, in my county, there is only one shelter or pound: the APL. It is a 501(c)(3) and privately ... the dog wardens, but doesn't have to take in any other dogs or adopt to people it chooses not to.

This entire description also fits the SPCA Melinda's referring to. They're also now 'no-kill.'
Cate
For example, in my county, there is only one shelter ... other dogs or adopt to people it chooses not to.

This entire description also fits the SPCA Melinda's referring to. They're also now 'no-kill.'

Oh, yeah, I forgot - -so is the APL. Well, they do euthanize for health and temperament (tons of feral kittens out here, and animals in unbelievably horrible condition). This means they need more volunteers to drive animals to neighboring states for adoption (about
2600 animals are normally taken in at the APL, or were until theydecided to be "no kill"). This "decision" to become no kill was made without first making any efforts to educate about spay/neuter or otherwise reduce the number of animals coming in to the shelter.

Shelter, SPCA, APL, pound, "no kill" - - they're just words, IMO.

Mustang Sally
She reminds me of somebody's dogs; I'll try to remember and come up with a URL.

It occurred to me last night that she looks like an Anadyr dog, at least from that photo. It's an absolutely huge line of dogs and a number of them have made it to the lower 48, so it's likely she's got some in there. Take a look at http://www.anadyr.com/dogs.htm , particularly Skookum and Coho. These are Iditarod/Quest dogs (i.e. 1000 mile races).
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Rate of job "creation" since recession ended in November 2001: 22,000 jobs lost per month
Well, they do euthanize for health and temperament (tons of feral kittens out here, and animals in unbelievably horrible condition).

Tompkins County says that their goal is to not euthanize any "adoptable" animals (we like vague words) and say that in
2003 they saved 93% of the animals that came in which, iftrue, is impressive. Of the dogs they killed, 66 were labelled "aggressive" (whatever that means to them) and 13 were labelled "non-rehabilitatable," which refers to health and to viciousness. I don't know why they choose to lump viciousness in with health rather than with aggression.

They also transferred 533 animals to outside groups. That's a big chunk of the 2529 they took in.
I do give them credit for a successful speuter-and-release program for stray cats. Still, I think I've mentioned before that I know vets who've stopped volunteering up there because so many of the kittens that they speutered at very young ages (8 weeks, etc.) were dying of infections.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Rate of job "creation" since recession ended in November 2001: 22,000 jobs lost per month
She reminds me of somebody's dogs; I'll try to remember and come up with a URL.

It occurred to me last night that she looks like an Anadyr dog, at least from that photo. It's an ... in there. Take a look at http://www.anadyr.com/dogs.htm , particularly Skookum and Coho. These are Iditarod/Quest dogs (i.e. 1000 mile races).

There's a lot of resemblance to Coho, and her facial markings are very similar to Nicolett. Tasha's ears are a bit large and set more to the sides of her head. I don't know that she'd have made a good sleddog; she's cowhocked. Lots of piebalds in the Anadyr lines, too. I don't think I've ever seen piebald marking in the show ring.

Mustang Sally
Well, they do euthanize for health and temperament (tons of feral kittens out here, and animals in unbelievably horrible condition).

Tompkins County says that their goal is to not euthanize any "adoptable" animals (we like vague words) and say that ... health and to viciousness. I don't know why they choose to lump viciousness in with health rather than with aggression.

That is odd.
They also transferred 533 animals to outside groups. That's a big chunk of the 2529 they took in.

Last I heard, animals that went to rescue (which includes any outside group) made up over half of the dogs that were 'adopted'. Not euthanizing adoptable animals is a worth goal however you define adoptable, but that goal will never be reached without reducing the number of animals born and educating about spaying and neutering. (I say spaying and neutering with the realization that some people choose not to do so because they believe there are valid health contraindications to those procedures. However, such people are usually capable of keeping their intact animals from contributing to the population. In this county, the reason people don't spay or neuter is not their concern for adverse health effects, and they are evidently not capable of preventing the animals from breeding.)
I do give them credit for a successful speuter-and-release program for stray cats. Still, I think I've mentioned before that ... because so many of the kittens that they speutered at very young ages (8 weeks, etc.) were dying of infections.

I'm not sure how I feel about speuter and release for ferals. It's not an issue in this county, though, which ignores them as long as it can and then euthanizes the ones they can't ignore.

Mustang Sally
I don't know that she'd have made a good sleddog; she's cowhocked.

A little cow-hocked is not generally regarded as a bad thing (a lot cow-hocked is, obviously).
Lots of piebalds in the Anadyr lines, too. I don't think I've ever seen piebald marking in the show ring.

They're becoming more popular. Color isn't supposed to matter, but show breeders do breed for it and to a great extent the Irish markings that are the expectation in the show ring are artificial. If you take a look at photos of Seppala's dogs, most of them didn't have Irish markings and some of them were all or mostly black. The Irish markings thing goes back to Monadnock's Pando. There was one Siberian Husky specialty in 1966 where he participated in the veteran's class, and someone figured out that 100 of the
103 dogs being shown were descended from him.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Rate of job "creation" since recession ended in November 2001: 22,000 jobs lost per month
I don't know that she'd have made a good sleddog; she's cowhocked.

A little cow-hocked is not generally regarded as a bad thing (a lot cow-hocked is, obviously).

I keep forgetting to mention her other unusual traits: her fur is silkier than "normal" Sibe fur and lays flat. She's double coated, and snow doesn't melt on her etc., but the fur is a little less dense than most Sibes'. Helpful people at places like PetsMart have suggested that she's a GSD mix or and Elkhound mix.
Lots of piebalds in the Anadyr lines, too. I don't think I've ever seen piebald marking in the show ring.

They're becoming more popular. Color isn't supposed to matter, but show breeders do breed for it and to a great ... in the veteran's class, and someone figured out that 100 of the 103 dogs being shown were descended from him.

That's a lot. I've read about Pando. Mukluk has Irish markings (real ones); he's a strikingly handsome dog. As soon as I learn to shrink photo files, I'll post some pictures of him. It's hard to imagine show breeders breeding for color when most of the dogs in the ring seem to be pastel - - pale gray, beige, cream - - I can't remember the last time I saw a real red and white. I suppose that's due at least in part to the way the hair is brushed, but still, it's pretty boring. There's a guy around here who does recreational sledding and gets all his dogs from the APL. He says he's never gotten one that didn't pull. Granted, he's not competing or anything like that. Do you think most show Siberians would/could pull?
Mustang Sally
There is NO "national organization" of SPCA. The ASPCA in NYC is an independent operation, not related to any SPCA in any city, county or state. Same deal with HSUS vs the "Anywhere County Humane Society".

Generally, there are PRIVATE shelters and PUBLIC shelters. They can call themselves whatever they want, but this is the real distinction - not shelter vs humane society vs spca. PUBLIC shelters are most often referred to as Animal Control Facilities, but may change their monikor at will. They are under the control of the local (at whatever level - city, county, state) government. Funds are from the government budget.

PRIVATE shelters don't receive public funding for the most part, unless there is some sort of special contract. They receive money from will, bequests, donations and fees. They don't HAVE to take lost animals, but often do. Policies range from animal-control-like time limits to no-kill, with the majority being "open admission". That means people aren't turned away, but no guarantees about placement.
These are important distinctions if one is responding to a direct mail plea or such. Know who your donation is going to. If you want it to be your local private shelter, give directly - a donation to the ASPCA will do nothing to help your local SPCA.
Janet Boss
Best Friends Dog Obedience
"Nice Manners for the Family Pet"
Voted "Best of Baltimore 2001" - Baltimore Magazine www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
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