At one time our cat (Mozart) had a little problem with holding down ordinary food so the vet sold us Hills Prescription Diet Feline W/D and we've been buying it ever since (several years). Do you think it's necessary to keep buying this food? Is there any harm in continuing to give this food to our cat? Can someone recommend a suitable alternative?

Thanks,
Mike
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At one time our cat (Mozart) had a little problem with holding down ordinary food so the vet sold us ... there any harm in continuing to give this food to our cat? Can someone recommend a suitable alternative? Thanks, Mike

You could try gradually changing to a premium quality cat food. You could also feed both, side by side. Unless there is another reason for giving W/D, aside from "holding it down", it shouldn't be necessary to continue it, in my personal opinion. IF the problem was hairballs, there are premium cat foods with additives already in them. Also there are over-the-counter additives if the food doesn't already contain them.
I would certainly ask your vet for an opinion, changing food is a deceptively important issue.

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circa Tue, 24 Feb 2004 13:21:11 -0500, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav, Michael B Allen (Email Removed) said,
At one time our cat (Mozart) had a little problem with holding down ordinary food so the vet sold us ... food? Is there any harm in continuing to give this food to our cat? Can someone recommend a suitable alternative?

Is your cat prone to chubbiness?
Hill's makes Science Diet as well as their prescription diets; if your cat likes the W/D, SD may be a good switch.
Laura

I am Dyslexia of Borg,
Your ass will be laminated.
Check with your vet first before taking stranger's advice about changing from a Prescription Diet to something else.
IF the problem was hairballs, there are premium cat foods with additives already in them. Also there are over-the-counter additives if the food doesn't already contain them.

To my knowledge, there aren't ANY "hairball foods" that have additives in them with the express purpose of controlling hairballs.
Check with your vet first before taking stranger's advice about changing from a Prescription Diet to something else.

IF the problem was hairballs, there are premium cat foods ... are over-the-counter additives if the food doesn't already contain them.

To my knowledge, there aren't ANY "hairball foods" that have additives in them with the express purpose of controlling hairballs.

Are you simply agreeing with my statement in this post that said "I would certainly ask your vet for an opinion, changing food is a deceptively important issue." ? My reason for asking is that you quoted almost all of my post, but left that out. It is vitally important to check with the vet, not just a good idea.

I did an Internet search for +"cat food" +"hairball control" and got
996 hits. These are the first four of them. They include big names andsmall companies.
http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod Display.cfm?siteid=1&pCatId=10076 http://www.epetpals.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?search=action&keywords="hairball foods" http://www.petco.com/search/mercado search results.asp?PN=default&CatEntry=&log=1&entry=Pet%20Gold%20Adult%20Cat%20Food%20Hairball%20Control%20Formula&cm ven=nik&cm cat=12&cm pla=fm4258389930&cm ite=1665530 http://www.chateau-animaux.com/product-product id/632

Obviously, with that many hits there are many more hairball control foods out there. I have seen several major brands at the local pet food stores. Also, I do not know how effective any of them are, I just know they exist.

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Check with your vet first before taking stranger's advice about changing from a Prescription Diet to something else.

In the OP's case, I think it would be fine to slowly phase in a small amount of their desired food and see if the cat resumes vomiting. Given that the cat's problem was vomiting, if the introduction of the new food does not lead to vomitage - well, then Bob's your Uncle. If the intro leads to vomiting, then revert to the W/D. It's not rocket science. Unless your cat is intending to go to Mars.
IF the problem was hairballs, there are premium cat foods ... are over-the-counter additives if the food doesn't already contain them.

To my knowledge, there aren't ANY "hairball foods" that have additives in them with the express purpose of controlling hairballs.

Your knowledge is incomplete. Iams, at least has a 'patented fibre source' in their anti-hairball food. This claimed to assist in hairball problems, oddly enough. Does it work? Who knows? IME, it seems to be no more effective in this respect than any other food I've fed my cats.
Steve.
To my knowledge, there aren't ANY "hairball foods" that have additives in them with the express purpose of controlling hairballs.

Your knowledge is incomplete. Iams, at least has a 'patented fibre source' in their anti-hairball food.

No, "psycho" yours is. I'm waiting for you to make the argument that everything in food is an "additive". The post was insinuating that additives such as petromalt, etc. may be in hairball controll foods. Most all hairball foods use higher levels of fibre as their "cure".
At one time our cat (Mozart) had a little problem with holding down ordinary food so the vet sold us ... food? Is there any harm in continuing to give this food to our cat? Can someone recommend a suitable alternative?

You might try Science Diet Sensitive Stomach same company, somewhat less expensive line, sold at pet stores rather than just at vets.

jamie (Email Removed)
"There's a seeker born every minute."
At one time our cat (Mozart) had a little problem with holding down ordinary food so the vet sold us ... there any harm in continuing to give this food to our cat? Can someone recommend a suitable alternative? Thanks, Mike

Mike,
You need to discuss this with your vet so you can understand exactly why the vet prescribed Prescription Diet w/d. There are almost no commercial foods which exactly match the nutrient profile of a therapeutic diet. As your cat ages, it will be necessary to change the diet to match the changes brought on by ageing. It may be that w/d is no longer needed, or in fact may be contraindicated as time goes by.
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