Well, we had a little incident this afternoon. I was paying attention to my cell instead of to where I was going, and tripped, wrenching my ankle in a chuckhole in the yard and dropping the leash as I fell.

Off went Roscoe.
I had no serious injury, just a twisted ankle, but there was *no* way I was going to catch him, even trailing the leash, in that state.

"Roscoe, come."
Roscoe looked at me, ran around me in a wide circle, then headed toward the subdivision, nose held high as if he smelled something intriguing.

For lack of any better ideas, I tried "leave it", which we've been working on for the past few weeks.
Roscoe stopped, turned around, and made a quick trot back to me. I took up his leash and hobbled over to the big tree in front to let him play with the swing rope for a bit, since I didn't really have it in me to run as a reward.
Not exactly what the command is for (I've been working on it to get him to disengage from playing with things that aren't his), but at least it worked!
Susan the Relieved
Congrats! It's nice when it works, isn't it? I had a similar incident not long ago. I was mixing together ... with, "Leave it!" and he stopped dead, and looked at me for more instruction. I was very proud of him.

Thank you! I know it is a small victory, but considering all I've been through with him, it felt good.
This leads me to wonder... there are two commands he's extremely good with, "leave it" and "wait", neither of which are used or misused by anyone else in the family. Is this coincidence, or could it help to find alternate command words for his problem commands, that aren't being confused for him by my folks?
Susan the Thoughtful

Congrats! It's nice when it works, isn't it? I had ... me for more instruction. I was very proud of him.

Thank you! I know it is a small victory, but considering all I've been through with him, it felt good. ... find alternate command words for his problem commands, that aren't being confused for him by my folks? Susan the Thoughtful

Absolutely.
In fact, when a dog is conditioned to NOT
respond to a command, I suggest a word
change. Its easier to just condition a
response to a new word than it is to
recondition a new response to an old word.
Congrats on making some headway.
Roscoe looked at me, ran around me in a wide circle, then headed toward the subdivision, nose held high as ... been working on for the past few weeks. Roscoe stopped, turned around, and made a quick trot back to me.

This reminds me of the time Maggie got out the front door and made a beeline for the street. This was when she was young and didn't have anything like a recall.
I yelled "SIT." She sat on the sidewalk and waited for me to come and get her. Good girl!

Mark Shaw (And Baron) moc TOD liamg TA wahsnm == "If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a man and his dog." -Twain
For lack of any better ideas, I tried "leave it", which we've been working on for the past few weeks. ... working on it to get him to disengage from playing with things that aren't his), but at least it worked!

That's terrific!
As Tara said, 99.9% of the time it's most effective to teach something brand new rather than trying to fix something that's been messed up ... either by teaching an alternative behaviour/command, or by re-teaching from the ground up, using a different command.
I know a trainer (who has 40+ years of professional experience with dogs) who has most students utterly re-teach recall with an alternative command, since the vast majority of dogs have learned that "come" is conditional and doesn't always have to be obeyed.
Mark Shaw (Email Removed) said in
This reminds me of the time Maggie got out the front door and made a beeline for the street. This ... recall. I yelled "SIT." She sat on the sidewalk and waited for me to come and get her. Good girl!

It's good to have an emergency command on a dog. I use "down", but "Hey!!!" works, too.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
This reminds me of the time Maggie got out the front door and made a beeline for the street. This ... recall. I yelled "SIT." She sat on the sidewalk and waited for me to come and get her. Good girl!

Hannah at 7 still has SIT as her most reliable command.. and I've been known to use it as needed
Nessa

trying to be the best human she can,