Hello,I am a brand new puppy owner (this is my 3rd dog). She is only 9 weeks old and we have only had her 3 days. We are in the process of crate training her. But we seem to have a problem already. We are doing everything we have read to do. Take her out after play, sleep, eat. She already knows how to ring a bell. The problem is that she does not want to potty outside no matter what we do. We started out waiting way too long. Now we have narrowed it down to 10-15 min.

then we come in put her in the crate, then out again in 10 min. or so. She will not go outside. I can smell gas, etc. and know she has to. When we take her in she either pees in her crate or on the carpet. We really want to succeed. We already had a dog that did the same thing and ended up an outside dog. We really don't want this to be the same way. She is a full bred cocker and very smart.
Please help. What can we do to get her to potty outside.

frustrated in IL
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Hello, I am a brand new puppy owner (this is my 3rd dog). She is only 9 weeks old and ... have a problem already. We are doing everything we have read to do. Take her out after play, sleep, eat.

That's not often enough.
She already knows how to ring a bell.

Maybe she just likes the sound of it?
The problem is that she does not want to potty outside no matter what we do.

Look, it's cold where you live. But that's still no excuse!

The trick right now is to get your dog used to going outside, not inside, yes, even if it's very cold out there, and you both have to dress up warmly before going out.
There was an old Fram oil filter commercial, where the guy said "You can pay me now. Or you can pay me later." Remember it?

That is, if you don't "pay him now" (by taking him outside often enough and long enough for him to become CONDITIONED to going outside, then you're going to "pay him later" (by having a dog who goes in the house her whole life.
We started out waiting way too long.

That's pretty much impossible to do, if you take note of when he normally needs to go and then take him outside at that time.

If you regulate his INPUT, you can pretty much regulate his OUTPUT, too.
Cockers are one of the more difficult dogs to housebreak, and that's why it's so important for you to get a handle on this NOW, otherwise you'r not going to like what happens from here on.
Now we have narrowed it down to 10-15 min. then we come in put her in the crate, then out again in 10 min. or so.

Do you have her on a leash? Do you always take her to the same spot (preferably where she or other dogs have went before)?

Try taking her to that special spot for 5-10 minutes, then take her for a walk. Let her sniff and smell where other dogs have gone before. If she's successful in any particular place, keep walking her to that same spot, too, whenever you take her out to "go."
She will not go outside.

Yes, she will.
I can smell gas, etc. and know she has to.

Take her somewhere else then, and call your gas company(!), too, because it just might indeed be gas, and if it is, you might find yourself orbiting some planet in the Horse Nebula one day.
When we take her in she either pees in her crate or on the carpet.

You just can't let that happen! I don't care what you have to do to prevent it, even if you have to follow her around on all fours, but you just can't let her make even one more mistake inside the house.

And if you do, you're back to square one.
We really want to succeed. We already had a dog that did the same thing and ended up an outside dog.

And that's exactly where this dog is headed, too, unless you step up and do your job - NOW.
"You can pay me now. Or you can pay me later."

Handsome Jack Morrison
Obamination?
http://howardwasright.com/index.php/site/more/458/
"You can pay me now. Or you can pay me later."

Oh, yeah.
Be sure to carefully clean up any mistakes (yes, all the old ones, too!) with an enzyme cleanser (e.g. Nature's Miracle).

Handsome Jack Morrison
Obamination?
http://howardwasright.com/index.php/site/more/458/
When we take her in she either pees in her crate or on the carpet.

Don't let her do that. Tether her to you and keep trying. Do you have ice or snow on the ground right now?

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Hi Janet,
Yes, well we did and now it is melting. She really liked it on the snow and is now on the deck til the 3 ft. of snow in the yard melts. We have only had her for 3 days and the first day she was virtually already trained? Went outside all day and learned to ring the bell and went potty outside when she did. Does the surface has something to do with it. She is a very smart dog otherwise. Already knows her name and sit and shake. Thanks for your help. I have ready about tethering. What about tethering to furniture. How would we see when she has to pee then?
Nancy
Does the surface has something to do with it.

You bet. Some dogs are more sensitive to things feeling yucky (or too slippery) than others.
She is a very smart dog otherwise. Already knows her name and sit and shake. Thanks for your help. I have ready about tethering. What about tethering to furniture. How would we see when she has to pee then?

No - tether to YOU, which has a lot of benefits. Teaching her to hang out where you are, keeping her in your sight, and not allowing mistakes.
My general pattern with housebreaking puppies is:
Feed 3x day. (3x up to 3 months if possible).
Take out first thing in the morning, last thing at night, after every single nap, after eating, and every hour to hour and a half when active (depending on the puppy). And never let the puppy out of your sight. Ever.
Take puppy out (no putting out), on leash if needed, and use a phrase which you will continue to use ("go pee" or whatever). Praise with "good (whatever)". 5 minutes and nothing? NO PLAY until the pup goes, when you know the pup should need to go. If pup doesn't go, tether to you for 5-10 minutes and repeat. Repeat for as long as necessary until you have outdoor success. Weaken and you'll set yourselves back.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
My general pattern with housebreaking puppies is:

Alright, killjoy... I'm not reading anymore housebreaking threads until AFTER I bring my boy home. I know what to expect (BTDT, several times) but want to live in the blissfull ignorance of anticipated puppy breath for the next 5 weeks.
NEENER! Emotion: smile

Lynne
Alright, killjoy... I'm not reading anymore housebreaking threads until AFTER I bring my boy home. I know what to expect (BTDT, several times) but want to live in the blissfull ignorance of anticipated puppy breath for the next 5 weeks.

Hey! You'll be just about adjusted to Daylight Savings Time when your little bundle of No Sleeping Through the Night arrives!

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

If you can't say it clearly, you don't understand it yourself John Searle
Hey! You'll be just about adjusted to Daylight Savings Time when your little bundle of No Sleeping Through the Night arrives!

Golden puppies (and all fuzzy retriever puppies/mixes) are perfect and sleep through the night from night one. At least mine all have! We split the difference for dinnertime feeding for the dogs when DST (or is that EDT) hits (just first day). What?!?!!? We have to WAIT?!?!?!

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
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