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k3 (Email Removed)
writes
Too bad you didn't try to rehome >the cat into a safe home where it wouldn't have to be declawed, and >could be respected for the whole >cat thatit was.

There's is a line between idealism and reality. If there were an abundance of homes (and, therefore, a tiny number of cats in shelters - as opposed to millions of them) it would be realistic to try to look for a loving home where declawing would not take place. There's not always such a place. Personally, I had paid a monthly fee to foster homes because I could not find permanent homes for some of the cats rescued. Be aware that the deed is done and the cat will be able to have a very normal existence.
catprotector@coxnet posts
You took the cat under the >condition that he be mutilated? >...you could have actually taken the time to teach ... who should >have been declawed so you could have >matched the lack of brain power >and reasoning youseem to have.

It's amusing to read your misguided rant "you could have matched the lack of brain power and reasoning you seem to have.". For the record, declawed cats do use the scratching post. Do a google search on that and kneading. Get back to us, sometime.
k3 (Email Removed)
writes
Too bad you didn't try to rehome >the cat into a safe home where it wouldn't have to be declawed, and >could be respected for the whole >catthat

it was.
There's is a line between idealism and reality. If there were an abundance of
homes (and, therefore, a tiny number of cats in shelters - as opposed to millions of them) it would be realistic to try to look for a loving home where
declawing would not take place. There's not always such a place. Personally, I
had paid a monthly fee to foster homes because I could not find permanent homes
for some of the cats rescued. Be aware that the deed is done and the cat will
be able to have a very normal existence.
You're right the deed is done. I have heard of other cats apparently doing fine after a declaw. The problem is I've heard of declawed cats who have larger problems because of the declaw then the owner would have had if they hadn't done it. My niece adopted a declawed cat who had one toe that just wouldn't heal. Needless to say he refused to use a box and ended up doing his business all over the place. At that point it wasn't behavior it was a medical problem. It was probably why the cat was abandoned and was put up for adoption in the first place. The rugs got destroyed either way. Not to mention the pain the poor kitty suffered every time the toe split open.

Like I said before, the problem I had with the poster is apparently no effort was made to adjust the scratching behavior before the kitty ended up declawed. Their are many things to try that are cheaper than the surgery to encourage appropriate scratching. I found with my Isabelle that it didn't take much time or effort to get her to leave my furnishings alone just a good cat tree/scratching post and some sticky tape. The total cost of not declawing was probably the same as the surgery but without any of the risks of surgery. I would encourage people to at least give it a try before throwing in the towel.
Wendy
There's is a line between idealism and reality. If there were an abundance of homes (and, therefore, a tiny number ... of them) it would be realistic to try to look for a loving home where declawing would not take place.

I just don't see the fine line. It's a question of mutilating a cat for owner convenience, or not. Declawing isn't going to help the overpopulation of shelters...that's a fraction, and besides, declawing doesn't guarantee a forever home. Plenty of declawed cats get returned to shelters because of peeing inappropriately and biting.
Sherry
So, for all you anti-declawers I would tell you to go get a life.

Nice troll.
Nothing better to do today than to advocate the mutilation of cats and tell everyone how you're not enough of a human being to train an animal, but instead require it to be mutilated prior to giving it a home?

You're the one trolling. Maybe YOU need to get a life, eh?

~kaeli~
Why do people who know the least know it the loudest? http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace
For the record, declawed cats do use the scratching post.

Hodge (front declawed by previous owner) uses the bookcase and just about anything else. He's not scratching so much as leaving his scent from his feet.

http://www.mindspring.com/~slywy /
http://slywy.diaryland.com /
Cat Protector,
You are presuming that a majority of cat owners subscribe to the idea that declawing is mutilation. Regrettably they don't. Regardless of how horrifying the procedure may be, there are a number of first time cat owners that don't understand the notion of training a cat not to scratch, or using a scratching post. It's an unfortunate situation, but as I stated in my earlier post; I'm happy that the cat cannot be counted as a statistic in an already overloaded shelter or humane society and that the cat has a home, not a cage.
Sounds like the challenge is to get these new owners informed. I wonder how many rescue organizations give new owners information on the many ways of encouraging your cat to scratch at appropriate locations. I would think this would help their cause as much as insisting the animals get neutered. If the cat isn't ripping apart the house that's one less reason for it to end back with the rescue organization or SPCA. Lets face it most methods for training the cat to use the scratching post or something similar are much cheaper than the vet bill for the declaw. I'm sure most people would give it a shot if they knew what to try.
Wendy
Cat Protector,
You are presuming that a majority of cat owners subscribe to the idea that declawing is mutilation. Regrettably they don't. Regardless of how horrifying the procedure may be, there are a number of first time cat owners that don't understand the notion of training a cat not to scratch, or using a scratching post. It's an unfortunate situation, but as I stated in my earlier post; I'm happy that the cat cannot be counted as a statistic in an already overloaded shelter or humane society and that the cat has a home, not a cage.
Wendy,
I agree 100%!
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