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You know your words do not phase me. Declawed cats do not have claws. All they could really do is paw but not scratch. I have to wonder if you are one of those people who are pro-declaw.

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Actually the numbers who don't declaw are much higher than you think. I don't think there is any excuse to declaw a cat no matter how much you try to sugar coat the reasons behind the procedure.

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of All Your Computer Needs! www.members.cox.net/catprotector/panthertek
Cat Galaxy: All Cats, All The Time!
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Understandably so, but who is to say that the cat wont be taken care of? I am presuming that since the cat has been in the ownership of the poster for six and a half years, that he or she has become somewhat attached to the cat and wouldn't "dump" the animal because of the reasons you indicated. I don't essentially agree with declawing. There are statistics that are being compiled by the local University (in my area) regarding how many felines are declawed yearly, opposed to how many declawed cats turn up in shelters and the humane society on a yearly basis.

The University is doing this research in an unbiased manor as a pledge to community service. Since there are so many people that are against the procedure of declawing, the hope is to finally have a resolution on the subject (in my area). These are due to be published soon. I'll email you when they become available.
.. I have heard of other cats >apparently doing fine ... niece adopted a >declawed cat who had one toethat >just

wouldn't heal///

...the problem I had with the poster >is apparently no effort was made to adjust the >scratching behavior before the>kitty ended up

declawed. Evidently, you and I (and a very large group of people who areinformed about the issue) support the no-declaw ... groups are cat loversand both groups do much to improve the lives of strays, cats waiting foradoption, and/or family pets.

I just want to say, again, that I am someone who has seen both side. I adopted a pregnant, semi-feral stray at six months old, and had her declawed because
1. She destroyed everything
2. I had no idea it was mutilation'
3. I was young and ignorant and had no idea I could train her.

Once I saw her after the operation I felt like some kind of Nazi. She was in pain and her formerly beautiful little front feet just looked like dustmops. Never the brightest kitty (but I loved her just as she was!) she had always been easily frightened and aggressive, sometimes for no reason. This got worse after the declaw she became a biter, and I mean to the bone. How did I get her to stop? I lightly smacked her, said "no" and isolated her in a time-out room. Eventually she stopped breaking the skin and would just bite me lightly and then lick me.
She stopped covering her poo in the box after declawing and stopped being as playful, too. I did right by here, kept her safe and indoors and took good care of her. She lived to be 20.
When I adopted my current two cats there was never any question about declawing. I would never do it again. Cats who feel helpless get mean and are easily frightened. I think declawing my first cat made her already mistrustful and fearful personality worse. It is one of the few things in my life that I truly regret.
Just my 2 cents.
Cat Protector,
Then let me pose the question (and don't bend what I type). Would you rather the cat (from the original post) be "FULLY CLAWED" in a cage at a shelter, humane society or otherwise, waiting to be adopted (which presumably may never happen). OR, would you rather the cat be declawed (as is currently is), residing in a seemingly well taken care of environment, where it is most probably fed on a regular basis, and given what special needs it has to have by, an owner who may be uneducated and unconcerned about the procedure of declawing, but otherwise cares for the cat? Which would you choose?
In my previous post to you, I never attempted to "sugar coat" the idea of declawing. Your understanding of declawing comes from you educating yourself about the matter and making your own decision regarding the issue. My point is that the majorities of first time cat owners don't bother to do the research on the topic of declawing, and fail to seek to resolve the matter using other methods. Just because this particular cat is declawed, doesn't specifically indicate that it will become another declaw statistic in a shelter for cats that are abandoned. Not every cat that is declawed is abandoned later in life. This cat may be exception!
I would rather see the cat get a good home from the shelter and still be fully declawed. I don't believe in de-clawing period. Your theory is pretty week because I never felt the need to declaw my cat Isis when I first adopted her. Isis to this day still has all her claws. Isis BTW, is the first cat I ever adopted. Your whole reasoning for declawing is really not of sound basis since their is no excuse for mutilating a cat, period. BTW, what makes you think that a cat in a shelter is always in a cage? There are at least a coupld of shelters I know of here in the Phoenix area that have cat rooms where the cats can freely mingle with both humans and the other cats up for adoption.

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of All Your Computer Needs! www.members.cox.net/catprotector/panthertek
Cat Galaxy: All Cats, All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com
.. I have heard of other cats >apparently doing fine ... niece adopted a >declawed cat who had one toethat >just

wouldn't heal///

...the problem I had with the poster >is apparently no effort was made to adjust the >scratching behavior before the>kitty ended up

declawed. Evidently, you and I (and a very large group of people who areinformed about the issue) support the no-declaw ... groups are cat loversand both groups do much to improve the lives of strays, cats waiting foradoption, and/or family pets.

I just want to say, again, that I am someone who has seen both side. I adopted a pregnant, semi-feral stray at six months old, and had her declawed because
1. She destroyed everything
2. I had no idea it was mutilation'
3. I was young and ignorant and had no idea I could train her.

Once I saw her after the operation I felt like some kind of Nazi. She was in pain and her formerly beautiful little front feet just looked like dustmops. Never the brightest kitty (but I loved her just as she was!) she had always been easily frightened and aggressive, sometimes for no reason. This got worse after the declaw she became a biter, and I mean to the bone. How did I get her to stop? I lightly smacked her, said "no" and isolated her in a time-out room. Eventually she stopped breaking the skin and would just bite me lightly and then lick me.
She stopped covering her poo in the box after declawing and stopped being as playful, too. I did right by here, kept her safe and indoors and took good care of her. She lived to be 20.
When I adopted my current two cats there was never any question about declawing. I would never do it again. Cats who feel helpless get mean and are easily frightened. I think declawing my first cat made her already mistrustful and fearful personality worse. It is one of the few things in my life that I truly regret.
Just my 2 cents.I never really thought about declawing one way or the other until last year when we got new carpeting and Ralf went to town. We have always had scratching posts and he was really cooperative getting his nails clipped (a real surprise as he HATED being picked up and was an extremely "shy"cat). We tried covering the spots he scratched with something else and he just moved on to another spot. The dh threatened to take him to have him declawed and that's when I had to address the whole issue.

I may have had it done but by then I was aware that it was an amputation and that gave me real pause. Additionally I was already aware of potential complications because of my nieces' cat. Unfortunately he died before we found a solution other than locking him in the laundry room at night as that's when he would do the damage. I'll wonder for the rest of my days if he found something toxic in there and that's what killed him. Emotion: surprise( Since then I have read a lot on the net and have had success with Isabelle.

I just wish I had know with Ralf what I found out since.
W
(Email Removed) writes
I just don't see the fine line. It's a >question of mutilating a cat for owner convenience, or not. Declawing ... >besides, declawing doesn't >guarantee aforever home. Plenty >of declawed cats get returned to >shelters because of peeing inappropriately and biting.

I can't force you to accept the "line" or any other issue or cause .. if you want to disregard opening your mind to accept more information and, instead. focus on your agenda - no one can stop you.
Nothing is going to guarantee a forever home. The person who adopts a cat will either be a decent human being and accept responsibility for the rest of the cats' life ... or make a decision to surrender or adopt out or dump the cat at some point. We can start an endless debate about this issue (what excuse is acceptable: severe allergic reaction where extensive remedies were tried and discarded to lifestyle change where cat doesn't fit in). No point.

In spite of your claim otherwise, declawing just may be the solution in a significant number of cases. People do adopt cats; they do have them declawed, and they have the cat in their home for the entire life of the cat!

I also question why the two zealots who hung me on a cross, didn't step forth to nail you to one for being such a narrow minded jerk.
Cat Protector,
You never answered my question, and you bent my words. The obvious has already happened, the cat was declawed because of an uneducated or unconcerned owner. That can't be fixed. Needless to say, a vast majority of cats are not adopted for different reasons from the humane societies and shelters around the country; that is a FACT. The scenario that I illustrated for you was to already state the obvious. The cat could have either gone to a shelter or a humane society with its claws or faced the uncertainty of not having a home; or going to a presumably conventional home, were it would be cared for without its claws by an owner who would support the expenses of having a cat, without its claws.I would have liked to see the cat retain its claws, but this owner apparently thought otherwise. Moreover, you probably adopted your first cat with an understanding of what is to come, and the responsibility involved. Be happy that the cat is cared for and is in home not a shelter waiting to be adopted. Furthermore, please point out where I advocate declawing in any of my posts, and I quote "Your whole reasoning for declawing is really not of sound basis since their is no excuse for mutilating a cat, period." never once have I indicated I agree with the procedure.

Moreover, these cat rooms exist throughout the county, I am not disagreeing about that. What happens to the cats when the facility is locked down for the evening? I don't believe that the shelters allow the cats to freely roam around the cat room when no one is there to monitor. They go into cages, for their own safety. I applaud your resilience regarding declawing, but the next time you reply to a post that anyone leaves for you, please read the entire post, and don't twist the words that are typed into meaning something that they don't.
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