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"Wendy" (Email Removed)
writes
.. I have heard of other cats >apparently doing fine after a declaw. The problem is >I've heard of declawed ... I had with the poster >is apparently no effort was made to adjust the >scratching behavior before the :>kitty endedup

declawed.
Evidently, you and I (and a very large group of people who are informed about
the issue) support the no-declaw position and believe of the horrific cruelty
of the procedure. However, there is another very large group of people who do
not yet believe or are unaware of the steps constituting a declaw and that is
is perceived/it is cruel and inhumane. Both groups are cat lovers and both groups do much to improve the lives of strays, cats waiting for adoption, and/or family pets.
Unlike those who own show dogs or pedigreed pets where the breeds routinely promote/expect the ear cropping/tail bobbing. Logic would dictate the absurdity
of this practice, ..you might think?!! Those who believe declaw is not dangerous or cruel may not know that it involves the amputation of a body part.
Some - many may truly believe (if they think about it) that only the nail is removed.
Obviously, more education/promotion is recommended to get the word out. There
are many people (who have good intentions) who post here with some unbelievable
things. For example, a few days ago, someone wondered if it was cruel to "neuter" their 7 year old female cat. While the answer would seem to be obvious
to a significant number of people - and perhaps viewed as a ridiculous question
(the answer being...go ahead and spay your cat...prevent ovarian cancer...etc.), it's not obvious to us all.
As far, the cat (described above) who went through a declaw and came out with a
toe that would never heal. Was that a botched job to blame on the veterinarian? If so..that issue should be covered. But, with that issue aside,
the behavior of a cat who is going/went through a specific procedure, sickness
or circumstance and comes out the other side a changed cat...maybe more factors
that the procedure/sickness/circumstance might be involved...a secondary cause
- joined with the primary cause - might be to blame.
I don't know if the paw problem was a botched declaw although it would appear so with no other info. My niece didn't know as the cat was adopted this way. She did tell me that she had seen similar problems when she worked for a vet. Not that the vet she worked for botched the job but rather people bringing cats into her vet with healing problems. Guess there's a vet in the area who doesn't know what he's doing. Shy of asking a vet for references from his declaw patients I don't know how one would avoid the less surgically skilled.
Just be happy that the cat isn't in a shelter ... hit by a car, or even euthanized. Deal with it.

Never. It is attitudes like yours that will make it harder to have the mutilating procedure banned. Read some of the archives. Diversion and training work.

In the meantime, if you don't have any patience to train the cat, go ahead and let it die on the streets and in a shelter. That's way better than mutilating the cat.
The University
is doing this research in an unbiased manor as a pledge to community service. Since there are so many people ... on the subject (in my area). These are due to be published soon. I'll email you when they become available.

Please post the results here.
Diversion and training work.

In the meantime, if you don't have any patience to train the cat, go ahead and let it die on the streets and in a shelter. That's way better than mutilating the cat.

This is an example of ignorance. Thanks for playing.
(Email Removed) writes
Guess there's a vet in the area who doesn't know what he's >doing. Shy of asking a vet for >references from his declaw patients I don't >know how one would avoid the >lesssurgically skilled.

If there is a suspicion that a certain vet or group of vets are peforming declaw surgeries improperly, there must be a way to investigate. I would suspect calling the local vet association for advice.
ray Ben
drools
.. go ahead and let it die on the >streets and in a shelter. That's way better than mutilating the cat.

Ray...stop showing us you have your head up your a**.
I answered your question. I guess you don't know how to read.

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Your answer wasn't an option in my question. Furthermore, please point out where I advocate the declawing of cats. I believe you are the one who needs to understand the fundamentals of reading. You can't seem to read what I type, even though everything is neatly spelled out before your eyes in complete sentences. You are the one that fails to comprehend what I type; then inject what you suppose, distorting my words. Read the last five posts that I have responded to on this thread that were addressed specifically to you, and then rationally deduce the key phrases. Hopefully, you will be able to read that I specifically asked you a question that you didn't answer, and you seem to think that I campaign for declawing.
What happens to the cats when the facility is locked down for the evening? I don't believe that the shelters allow the cats to freely roam around the catroom when no one is there to monitor. They go into cages, for their own safety.

Perhaps in some shelters, but not all. We currently have one multiple cat room that holds a maximum of 10 cats. They don't have cages. We're working on turning the kitten rooms into another pair of playrooms... that will not have cages.
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