I'm about to launch into this in earnest with my rescue dog, who is about 16 months old and has no idea of it at all. In fact, usually the reverse. (Her previous owners taught her to beg on her hind legs and shake hands, but not to sit, down, stay, heel, or come. Grr...) I've read about various methods over the years, but always had the benefit of puppyhood when teaching it.
What does everyone else do with an older dog, especially a spooky, wilfull, not-too-bright one who regards most things with suspicion ? At the moment she'll come when she knows there's a treat to be had, but only occasionally otherwise. (The "occasionally otherwise" actually represents a significant amount of progress, believe it or not.)
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I'm about to launch into this in earnest with my rescue dog, who is about 16 months old and has ... be had, but only occasionally otherwise. (The "occasionally otherwise" actually represents a significant amount of progress, believe it or not.)

One way is to teach her to come to a whistle. Blow the whistle then drop a piece of hot dog (or whatever treat she loves). Do this repeatedly until she gets the idea that whistle means treat. Then practice in the back yard when she is loose. You have to be consistent and reward everytime she comes to you. You can also use your voice the same way, tell her to COME, then drop the hot dog for her Emotion: smile
I am watching this thread...I am curious.
How do you deal with a dog that looks to see if there is a treat present, then sometines makes the decision to "come" based on that. My recall is about 90%, but I live on a busy road and I really would like to develop 100% recall. I am completely fenced and secure, but twice in two years, company has left the door open. (I know, that's a whole training issue there, too. We do really well with the door thing, but we have a lot of company all the time, and these two instances, the door was left invitingly open too long.)
Perry
I am watching this thread...I am curious. How do you deal with a dog that looks to see if there is a treat present, then sometines makes the decision to "come" based on that.

don't let them see the treat. sometimes harriet gets a regular treat, sometimes she gets Really Good Treat, and sometimes she gets bupkis (well, not exactly bupkis she always gets praised, regardless). she never knows which of those three it'll be, which is a good reinforcement.
My recall is about 90%, but I live on a busy road and I really would like to develop 100% ... have a lot of company all the time, and these two instances, the door was left invitingly open too long.)

work on teaching them that they are notnotnot allowed to cross the threshold without permission. it's a lot easier than you might think.

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net
http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com /
http://letters-to-esther.blogspot.com / (updated 7/10/05)
"work on teaching them that they are notnotnot allowed to cross the threshold without permission. it's a lot easier
than you might think."
I do just that...but somehow, I think the dog percieved permission from the company.
I also do the variety thing with the treats. Just looking for more tips and pointers.
Perry
I do just that...but somehow, I think the dog percieved permission from the company.

then you aren't being clear with your dogs on the definition of "permission." i think that's not quite fair on your part.
I also do the variety thing with the treats. Just looking for more tips and pointers.

and i gave you one: don't let them know whether or not you have anything to give them, until they've come to you and you're ready to treat them (or not).

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net
http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com /
http://letters-to-esther.blogspot.com / (updated 7/10/05)
"and i gave you one: don't let them know whether or not you have anything to give them, until they've come to you and you're ready to treat them (or not)"
"shelly"
Ok...this is where my question lies. Not ALL dogs train the same. There are posters on the group...that proclaim "NOT allowed in my house, yada, yada". "won't allow a dog to NOT come"...
I have one dog who is 13yo who is 110% recall reliable, I have even shut her down in full chase after a squirrel. My little mixed terrier is pretty reliable, but then she's not very bright, but awfully trainable and really cute.
The negotiator is clever. I do dedicated training, I work on the recall. I call her from where she can't see me or not to see if I have a treat. Not all dogs react or train the same way. Like I said, just looking for some pointers and some tips.
I hear all the "rules" and yes the rules help, but I can't get my girlie dog to read the rule book. (I know, read it myself and teach it to her) Not all good dogs go by the rules. It's not because she's the one that gets by with things...All the dogs have gotten the same training. I get compliments on how well behaved they are. This particular dog is an independent thinker. She's a Boston, about 2.5 years old. Female, spayed.

Perry
I am watching this thread...I am curious. How do you deal with a dog that looks to see if there ... a lot of company all the time, and these two instances, the door was left invitingly open too long.) Perry

I live on a road with a fair amount of traffic also, Perry, and I trained my dog to never go through the door unless given permission. (We're working on this with the new one.) What I do is this: every time I go to the door with the dogs, I have them sit. I then step through the door, make eye contact with the dog, wait a moment, then tell them to come along. Actually, with the older one I wouldn't go through this routine any more since he's fully trained on this,I'd just give him permission to go out but I'm doing it to train the younger one.
I'm about to launch into this in earnest with my ... represents a significant amount of progress, believe it or not.)

One way is to teach her to come to a whistle. Blow the whistle then drop a piece of hot ... can also use your voice the same way, tell her to COME, then drop the hot dog for her Emotion: smile

Ooh, I like this one. She is definitely food oriented, so it should work well. (When we first got her, I used a lot of treating to get her to walk on a leash, pay attention to me, and so on. She was so keyed up that it was the only thing that could even semi-capture her attention. If something like a motorcycle passed us, she lost even the ability to pay attention to treats. The other day, one passed us and she didn't even give it a glance. I have to remind myself periodically that she has made progress...)
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