Hi, this is a rather urgent question, so if anybody answers today I, and specially a little hummingbird, will be very greatful!

The hummingbird flew into my house yesterday night, and collided with my ceiling ventilator, its a slow ventilator and it survived with only a slighlty bruised wing. It can still fly but it tires rapidly, so if it eats it should heal.
The problem is this hummingbird is hurt and it needs to consume around 5-14 times its body mass each day to survive, I don't have a cage, a feeder.
How can I feed this one? If anybody knows anything please advice. Thanks.
Sebastian
PD: Sorry if I doubled posted. I wrote the message before but Google returned me some kind of error so I don't know if the first one got through
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Hi, this is a rather urgent question, so if anybody answers today I, and specially a little hummingbird,

Hi,
I've been told that they feed on sugar water. 1 part sugar 4 parts water. Boil it to kill any bacteria, let it cool then pour it into a feeder. You can buy
feeders at Wal-mart.
I would think any small cage would do in emergency. I'm thinking you should suspend a thick rope/cloth from the top so that the humming bird can cling to it. In uk they sell hanging bird houses made of grasses maybe one of those if available would be a longer term solution??

Contact your local wildlife shelter. They may be able to help.

o)
My US newsgroup friend says that the sugar water mix should keep for 5 days if refrigerated. Bring up to air temperature before feeding.

o)
Hi, this is a rather urgent question, so if anybody answers today I, and specially a little hummingbird,

Hi, I've been told that they feed on sugar water. 1 part sugar 4 parts water. Boil it to kill ... if available would be a longer term solution?? Contact your local wildlife shelter. They may be able to help. Emotion: surprise)

Nectar or the feeder equivalent of sugar water is only their high energy sustenance because they burn so many calories. They eat other important things such as protein in the form of bugs for one.

Your suggestion of contacting a local wildlife shelter is great advice, but must be done really fast. I doubt these little guys have the ability to stay alive very long without food intake.

Sincerely,
Joanne
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Nectar or the feeder equivalent of sugar water is only their high energy sustenance because they burn so many calories. They eat other important things such as protein in the form of bugs for one.

Thanks for pointing out my ommission. I was only thinking very short term. I agree it will need specialist help ( if available) if its going to be more than an overnight stop.
o)
Hi all,
Thanks for the kind concern, I'll tell you how the story ends now. Well, at least as far as my involvment in it goes.

When the little bird, it was a very young chick I later verified, flew into my room it was knocked almost unconscious by the wooden ceiling ventilator, luckily it wasn't turning too fast. The chick was the size of my thumb finger so it could have been easily killed.

After I made my initial post I prepared a half sugar, half water 'nectar' as I had found by googling for help. Anyway it wouldn't drink from the 'quick-n-dirty' red birdfeeder I improvised so I dipped my finger and after a while it started licking the sugar off my fingertips.
Pretty rapidly it started feeling a lot more energetic and after a while it recovered its capacity to fly continuosly without tiring. Still, I felt it wasn't going to get anywhere near the necessary food from my fingertips (remember, 5 times its weight daily consumption) so I thought it would be better to let it go and find food by itself. I live in Argentina, I checked the page for wildlife rehabilitators but there are none here for a 1000 mile radius so I was out of luck with respect to that.
I opened the window and the bird, instead of flying away settled about
10 feet from the window and started twirping for its mom, which startedchirping back a few minutes later and showed up soon after.

So I took a few snaps! Here are the links for your enjoyment:



The mother fed it insects every 5-10 minutes for most of the morning, growing up requires much more protein than sugar for hummingbirds too after all. Then they both flew away. I hope they come back and visit Emotion: smile Thanks again and I hope you enjoy the pictures!
Seb
"Sebastian Ferreyra" (Email Removed) wrote in message > Thanks again and I hope you enjoy the pictures!
Thanks for the update I'm soo glad it was accepted by its parent.

o)
Hi all, Thanks for the kind concern, I'll tell you how the story ends now. Well, at least as far ... flew away. I hope they come back and visit Emotion: smile Thanks again and I hope you enjoy the pictures! Seb

Happy ending and nice pictures. Thank you.

Sincerely,
Joanne
If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

Play - http://www.jobird.com
Pay for Play - http://www.jobird.com/refund.htm
Looking for Love? - http://www.jobird.com/hearts.htm Garden Kinder CDs
http://www.jobird.com/cd/gardenkinderhome.html
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