Just got the (pre dental)lab results back for my 14 yr old tabby and found out that he has a T4 of 118 nmol/L. The dental cleaning will be delayed until his thyroid condition is under control.

We have decided that pilling him with Tapazole is not an option because he hates pilling and even goes through a personality and behavioral change when subjected to pills.
We considered surgery but was told that thyroidectomy is a precise surgical procedure with some risk and often results in hypothyroidism and then we're back to pilling again.
So Zak is going to Thames Valley Vet Services www.tvvs.ca on Jan 10 for radioiodine treatment and will be an in-patient for a week.

Thames Valley Vet Services is located in London, Ontario on the campus of St. Joseph's Health Care London. The facility is part of the Lawson Health Research Institute. As the research arm of the London Health Sciences Centre, the LHRI is one of Canada's three largest hospital-based research institutes. I feel he will be in good hands and they say Zak is a very good candidate due to his excellent renal and other numbers.
I'll post a follow up in January including the interesting experience of banning a radioactive lap cat from the bedroom for 3 weeks :-)

-mhd
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Just got the (pre dental)lab results back for my 14 yr old tabby and found out that he has a ... in good hands and they say Zak is a very good candidate due to his excellent renal and other numbers.

I'd still suggest trying him on tapazole for a while in case treating the hyperT unmasks latent kidney disease (excellent renal numbers won't necessarily stay that way after I-131). There are so many cats on the CRF list who were only diagnosed with CRF after treatment for hyperT. You might be able to obtain the tapazole in compounded form to avoid giving pills.

http://www.felinecrf.org/related diseases.htm#hyperT treatments

HTH
Helen
We have decided that pilling him with Tapazole is not an option because he hates pilling and even goes through ... is a precise surgical procedure with some risk and often results in hypothyroidism and then we're back to pilling again.

FWIW, my mother (a human, not a cat) had radioiodine treatment and it resulted in hypothyroidism and daily pills. While certainly preferable to surgery, you may end up having to pill your cat, anyway.

Regardless, I hope it works out for your cat. Good luck!

rona

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Hi,
My cat had the radioactive iodine done 2 years ago in January. At the time she was 10, and I couldn't imagine giving her a pill every day for the next 5-8+ years. She did very well with it - only one dose worked fine. I was never told that she became hypothyroid. The biggest thing they stressed after the treatment, was that the litter would be radioactive and had to be flushed down the toilet instead of thrown out in the trash, for a period of about 3 weeks. I never regretted doing the treatment, even though it cost $1000! It was worth it not to have to deal with the pills.

Please Please Please, after this is done PLEASE have your cat monitored closely. A year after the hyperthyroidism she developed kidney disease, then high blood pressure, and eventually went blind due to retinal detatchment from high blood pressure. I'm not saying that these were caused by the radio iodine - absolutely not - but they are all inter-related, and depending on how long your cat has been hyperthyroid, some of his other systems may have been compromised.
Just follow your vets suggestions and keep monitoring his blood work, and everything should go ok.
Meghan
I'd still suggest trying him on tapazole for a while in case treating the hyperT unmasks latent kidney disease (excellent ... CRF after treatment for hyperT. You might be able to obtain the tapazole in compounded form to avoid giving pills.

He will be having an Feline Early Renal Detection test just before he goes in as I know blood tests are not that indicative. This is a new procedure and is very accurate.
-mhd
FWIW, my mother (a human, not a cat) had radioiodine treatment and it resulted in hypothyroidism and daily pills. While certainly preferable to surgery, you may end up having to pill your cat, anyway.

So did my sister-in-law. Apparently in humans they often destroy the thyroid whereas with cats they take a "just enough to get the job done" approach. The clinic will be giving him 2.5 units which is conservative.
-mhd
Hi, My cat had the radioactive iodine done 2 years ago in January. At the time she was 10, and ... to be flushed down the toilet instead of thrown out in the trash, for a period of about 3 weeks.

I use flushable anyway but will be saving the liners for 3 weeks before disposing. The garage makes a good deep freeze up here in Canada :-)
I never regretted doing the treatment, even though it cost $1000! It was worth it not to have to deal ... inter-related, and depending on how long your cat has been hyperthyroid, some of his other systems may have been compromised.

Monitoring for the next year is part of the procedure. My regular vet can do the tests and just bills the clinic for the testing. They also offer a free top-up procedure if he needs it, which is just a day procedure. Sometimes top-ups are needed because they take a very conservative dosage approach. They apparently have a much less than the 2.5% hypothyroid statistic which is rate in cats.

Since my vet now offers the Early Renal Detection testing which exposes problems much earlier than blood panels, I will be doing that for the rest of his life. We did catch this early as his T4 6 months ago showed a normal range.
-mhd
"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon
Hi, My cat had the radioactive iodine done 2 years ago in January. At thetime she was 10, and I ... have been compromised. Just follow your vets suggestions and keep monitoring his blood work, and everything should go ok. Meghan

I think that's why it's often suggested that Tapazole/methimazole (generic of Tapazole) be tried first, before the radioactive iodine treatment. In case treating the hyperthyroidism unmasks CRF.You made an excellent point, re: high blood pressure. It can be associated w/ either of these diseases, & if left untreated can result in blindness. Otoh, even if the bp is not diagnosed & the cat does goes blind, as long as one realizes quickly what's going on & the high bp is treated ASAP, it's possible for the retinas to reattach & the cat's vision to return. Just in the last couple of years, more & more vets are now equipped to take a cat's blood pressure.

It used to be very difficult to find a vet who had the equipment & skill to take a bp reading. For ex., In the spring of 2001 I needed to go to an internist/oncologist over an hour away to get my CRF cat's bp read. The next closest was a practice near Ithaca/Cornell, which is 2 hours from here. (Yes, it was high, & required med.) But within several months after that, my own vets' practice - 4 minutes from my house - was then equipped to do it.
Cathy
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