i've had my puppy for two weeks now. she's reaching 10 weeks old. the first few nights i had her sleep in her crate but i realized she didn't connect it with being her den/home so i moved it in the kitchen to try to get her used to her crate. a couple of nights, i let her rest in my bed. this past week i've tried making her run around and catch toys for at least 20 minutes before i wanted her to go to sleep this worked for a couple days, in tiring her out.

At about 10-11pm she gets real playful and wants to bite me, my roommate or my boyfriend. We end up clapping to throw her off guard or giving her a toy to chew on. Each day i'm getting a little less sleep because when i lie down, she thinks it's playtime and she jumps on my bed trying to go for my face. The past couple of nights, that has happened and one, i actually slept sitting up. It seems to have gotten worse as the nights progressed but i'm thinking maybe it might be a good idea to put her in her back in her crate next to my bed with the door closed b/c now i know she can jump on it ( i usually put some toys in there and hide treats).

Once I put her in there it'll take a few minutes of whining for her to calm down and rest. Sometimes I feel like I punish her too much for biting. We managed to housetrain her well, but when no one's keeping a close eye on her, she likes to *** in random spots. So i decided to leave her in the kitchen when we leave to go to work. I assume every little thing i do or say to her will effect her development to becoming an adult dog. i think the fact that in the morning she gets small doses of playtime with everybody as we all wake up and leave.

i'm there to feed her and bond with her because she wont finish unless i'm next to her and i'm there to pet her when she's eating. my roommate and bf are there to play w/her and get her hyped up for the day. In the afternoon, we're all awake together so i think that gets her hyped up. i've explained to my roommate and boyfriend that what they're teaching her and what i'm teaching her, is getting her confused. Now that makes me wonder , is everything we're doing effect her sleep at night?
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this past week i've tried making her run around and catch toys for at least 20 minutes before i wanted ... tiring her out. At about 10-11pm she gets real playful and wants to bite me, my roommate or my boyfriend.

It takes longer than 20 minutes to really tire out a 10 week old puppy. Try having her run around, fetch, exhaust herself in various ways throughout the afternoon and evening, then have a quiet petting time right before going to bed. She still won't sleep through the whole night since she is so young that she will wake up needing to go potty, but she should sleep more. When we had a small pup around, we took turns keeping him awake and active in the hours before bedtime to be sure he didn't nap too close to bedtime to be able to fall asleep, too.
Crating at night is fine if sleeping in the bed is just not working, but if the dog is crated at night and crated all day while you are gone, it isn't getting enough active and interactive time with people to grow up to be the kind of adult dog you will love to have around the house.

Paula
"Anyway, other people are weird, but sometimes they have candy, so it's best to try to get along with them." Joe Bay
A ten week puppy is way too young to leave alone while you go to work. At night if you do have the puppy in a crate, put a ticking clock underneath the bed the puppy lies on as this will mimic the heartbeat of the mother.It is too much to expect the puppy to stay in the crate all night as it is young and your schedule is not in harmony with it's tender age. It takes sacrifice to have a dog and someone needs to be there to comfort and calm the dog. I used to take a lawn chair into the bedroom where I had the crate and as soon as I heard the puppy waking up, I would take it outside to pee and poop and then lie down with it in the lawn chair and put it on my heart so it could hear the heart beat and sooth the pup by cuddling it gently until it fell asleep and then put it gently into the crate with the ticking clock and in a few nights the pup would settle into the security that it was okay in the new home.

The part of leaving it alone while you work is not going to work. Someone needs to come to the house who takes care of the pups needs. It is like solitary confinement and we are talking about a little baby puppy.
It is not convenient to meet the needs of the pup as you have to adjust your lifestyle and make sacrifices, however it is a living being and if it is too hot get out of the kitchen and find the pup a new home were the people know the responsibilities that come with a puppy. And who are also willing to make arrangements for when they go to work to get the dogs needs met. This can be very expensive, and if the cost is too high then perhaps a puppy is not something you thought through enough before you got it.
Show Dog Bark
A ten week puppy is way too young to leave alone while you go to work.

Do you suggest she quits her job?
At night if you do have the puppy in a crate, put a ticking clock underneath the bed the puppy lies on as this will mimic the heartbeat of the mother.

Not really.
It is too much to expect the puppy to stay in the crate all night as it is young and your schedule is not in harmony with it's tender age.

Depends on the type of puppy. Have yet to get up for a retriever puppy during the night.
It takes sacrifice to have a dog and someone needs to be there to comfort and calm the dog. I ... and in a few nights the pup would settle into the security that it was okay in the new home.

I keep puppies in MY bedroom, and say a simple and sweet goodnight and put them in the crate right next to my bed. We all sleep well.
The part of leaving it alone while you work is not going to work.

The OP didn't elaborate. Hiring a dog walker to come in 1-2x is a perfectly reasonable thing if work is too far to do that, but the puppy doesn't need an all day sitter.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
A ten week puppy ... too high then perhaps a puppy is not something you thought through enough before you got it. Show Dog Bark

Well said, SDB.
I remember years ago, when my (then teenaged) daughter and I took turns sleeping on the kitchen floor in a sleeping bag to stay with a new puppy who cried at night.
Dogs are a lot of work, as we all know, but for human beings who work, having dogs is like having a second job. I hear of people who leave their dogs unattended and unwalked, all day while they go to work, and I did it myself years ago when I was employed. But in truth, the dogs suffer for it, unless some adaptations are put into effect.
Getting a young person to take a puppy out after school, walk it, and exercise and play with it for a while, can be a big help if you don't get home from work till later. Coming home at lunch time, if it is at all possible, can help too. I have done all of those with pups, so they weren't in a crate all day, then again in a crate all night with not enough free time to play and exercise and interact with people.

Then in the evenings, if you sit and watch TV all evening or socialize with your own pursuits, your puppy doesn't get much benefit either. I used to attend several dog training classes in different areas, or else work with the dog myself at home, then run off to dog shows on the weekends. I wasn't alone, and my kids all helped as well. So my dogs did get a lot of attention and activities, and there was an entire support network to help.

Having a puppy is a huge committment. Think how it would feel to be your own dog, and you will get an idea what life is like for him/her. I am not saying that you shouldn't have a dog if you work, of course, but that you need to really work at dog ownership too.
That said, if a puppy has been sufficiently socialized, fed, walked, exercised, and it is bedtime and the family is trying to sleep, providing some company for a very young puppy is fine. But at a certain point you do want the puppy to learn to sleep alone in the crate at night, just like you'd like your baby to sleep in its crib all night. A sharp NO! is not out of line if a puppy is yapping at night. Note that I am not saying this for a little baby puppy that is only just missing its mother and litter mates.
Another trick is to cover the crate with an old quilt, and to make sure the crate is in a dark place. We often found that helped, especially since our crates were the old fashioned metal cage type crates, rather than the newer, airline style crates, which are more closed in. The quilt muffled noise, gave a sense of being closed in like a "den" and lent itself to comfort and sleep.

Best Regards,
Evelyn
(to reply to me personally, remove 'sox')
I remember years ago, when my (then teenaged) daughter and I took turns sleeping on the kitchen floor in a sleeping bag to stay with a new puppy who cried at night.

Why on earth wouldn't you just sleep in your bed and bring the puppy into the bedroom?
Then in the evenings, if you sit and watch TV all evening or socialize with your own pursuits, your puppy doesn't get much benefit either.

You don't interact with your dog while you watch TV? Mine ar snuggled up against me.
That said, if a puppy has been sufficiently socialized, fed, walked, exercised, and it is bedtime and the family is ... I am not saying this for a little baby puppy that is only just missing its mother and litter mates.

Again, why can't the crate be in the bedroom, which many of us do? Solves the entire problem.
our crates were the old fashioned metal cage type crates, rather than the newer, airline style crates, which are more closed in.

Where do you get that wire crates are old fashioned? They're preferable to airline crates in many situations. I generally start a puppy in an airline crate overnight, with a much larger wire crate for times when I'm away from the house. They get used to both types, on is in the bedroom and the other in the family room, and things run smoothly. I still can't figure out why anyone would sleep on the kitchen floor (although I did sleep on the bathroom floor with a sick adult dog once, because the bedroom carpet would have suffered if he had been in there.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
You don't interact with your dog while you watch TV? Mine ar snuggled up against me.

Other than sleeping on the bathroom floor, I think that much of what she's described is default behavior among people who love dogs but maybe have less involvement in dog activities that would lead them to become a little more aware of dog behavior.
My mother is staying with me for a bit and it's been a real eye-opener. She's someone who considers herself a dog-lover, but shortly after she got here she asked "Wouldn't it be nice to have a room in the house where the dogs don't go?" My reaction was "I'm sorry, but I just can't parse that - could you repeat it in English?" but I think she's probably more typical than I am (heck, I know she is). The dogs usually come into the living room and snooze while I watch TV, and even though we're not interacting directly (except for Crow, who crawls on top of me and sprawls out) it's a bonding thing, which I think never occurred to my mother or, I think, to most people.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
The dogs usually come into the living room and snooze while I watch TV, and even though we're not interacting ... sprawls out) it's a bonding thing, which I think never occurred to my mother or, I think, to most people.

I think you're right. At this moment, I'm sitting at the kitchen island using my laptop (it migrated here and never left!). 3" to my right in Lucy, snoozing. 1" to my left is Rudy, snoozing. 6" to my left is Franklin, snoozing (see a pattern here? ;-D). This scenario is pretty common, whether I'm sitting at a desk or table, sitting on the couch, the bed, whatever. They surround me wherever I am. It's quiet companionship, something they need and enjoy, as do I. If I'm home, they're at my side - I wouldn't want it any other way. I guess I'm still surprised when people prefer to exile their dogs for any number of interesting reasons.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
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