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I feel betrayed. How could a dog do this to ME? I love dogs more than my own life. I know this is a nonsensical way to feel, and it amuses me in a way that I feel it. But it's there.

It's a totally sensical was to feel.
My stepdaughter loved snakes. She once picked up a garter snake which then bit her, drawing blood. She was in tears, not because of any pain, but because of the betrayal.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
"Leah" (Email Removed) skrev i melding
Ironic. This is a high-risk job for bites, and I've come close a coupleof times. But this time it had ... time, I'd be in the hospital right now. Shetore my pants and gave me a bad scrape above the knee.

(snip)
paying any attention to her. I could understand if it was a dog I wasworking with, if I could point ... it, something I could learn from. But this was straight out of left field. I can't getmy head around it.

Your wierded out raction makes sense to me, Leah, because from what you describe it was totally unexpected; you didn't see it coming.
I'm sure some of you other trainers and people who worked in vet clinicshave been bitten. Did you get all weirded out, too? Or am I just... weird? :}

I was bitten by my previous Airedale (Chewie, not my present Angel) once, when I deliberately moved in front of him to block his view of a another dog he was creating at. Chewie took a swiping chomp at my hand and drew blood.
My reaction was instant and unthinking, in fact
I surprised myself. I grabbed him by the neck and yelled at him "What in the F do you think you're doing?"
He backed down and started acting ingratiating right away. (Lucky for me) And yeah, I got weirded out, but probably for a different reason than you did.
Because a reflex I didn't know I had took over.
Because I was far from sure that what I did was right. Because I was acting on an uncontrolled impulse just as much as the dog I was presuming to lead / discipline.
He never waved a tooth at me again, though.
By the time my head cleared enough to realize I needed the owners toprovide proof of a rabies vaccination (I at first refused to go for medical help),they were gone.

Can we assume this means that you understand you need it and will get the necessary medical protection?
I sure hope you're OK, Leah.
Fingers crossed,
Laura
I'm willing to bet that an experienced observer - somebody standing back and watching this incident- could clearly have read ... the dog who was close to you - you might have had some warning that she was going to bite.

Oh, no doubt! However, when you're walking in a store crowded with dogs and people, you would need more than one set of eyes to be able to monitor them all. :}
I'm sure I somehow startled her and threatened her. I move and walk quickly. I was far enough away from her that when I stepped back, I was out of her leash range (though I wasn't fast enough to escape teeth altogether).

Here's what I think happened, in her eyes. A person suddenly appeared too close to her space, and she gave a warning growl. At the sound of the growl, I turned to look at where it was coming from. She took that split-second of eye contact as a threat.
So I guess I did learn something. If I hear a growl next to me, MOVE AWAY. Don't waste time trying to find out who's growling. :}

PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
But they're almost never serious bites, and they go with the job.

The ironic part is that there are times I should have been bitten, but wasn't. I reached into a puppy fight and picked up the aggressor. I went into it thinking, "I'm going to get bitten now." The little stinker spun around with her mouth open, saw it was a human, and chilled. Whew.

And then there was the time I held two spatting pit bulls apart by their respective collar and harness. Neither tried to turn on me.

I expected to get bitten at some point. I expect I will get bitten again. But I didn't think it was going to happen this way, by a dog I was just walking past in the store.
My manager said, "It's because you smell like so many dogs." Could that be a factor? So that I'm more at risk from dog-aggressive dogs than people-aggressive dogs?
PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
Can we assume this means that you understand you need it and will get the necessary medical protection? I sure hope you're OK, Leah.

Oh, I'm fine. It doesn't even hurt today. I got antibiotics, a tetanus shot, and a salve I'm supposed to put on it 3 times a day. I initially refused medical help because I had a class coming up in 2 hours, and knew I would miss it.
I did refuse the rabies treatment, though. The risk of rabies around here is very, very low. I can't remember the last time I heard of a rabid animal of any kind. Not worth going through it.
PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
My manager said, "It's because you smell like so many dogs." Could thatbe a factor? So that I'm more at risk from dog-aggressive dogs than people-aggressive dogs?

Heh. Hope not. If that was true, I'm sure my dog-aggressive (highly when not under my direct influence, semi when under my influence) collie would have taken a huge chunk out of me by now.
I've only been bitten once hamstringed by a friend's German Wirehair. (She, her mother, and all her littermates were euthed for aggression issues. Methinks there were more than few screws loose in that line.) I did get grabbed once by my collie, but he was trying to bite another dog and I stuck my arm in his mouth so he wouldn't land, figuring my own bills, paid by insurance, were better than the risk of my paying for a fight that I didn't cause. He went "DAMN! Not other dog!" and stopped before he did more than a bruise.
~Emily
snip
Another PS trainer friend was bitten badly by a 6 month old Cocker Spaniel. Put a nice hole in her wrist and the owner never said a word...snip

The worst biters when I groomed, were Cockers.
Of course, we got a high number of them, so YMMV.
I never have gotten bitten badly enough by grooming dogs to "squirt" blood.
Knock on formica.
I have a harder time reading body language on floppy eared dogs than I do with pointy eared ones, for some reason.
Terri
Oh, no doubt! However, when you're walking in a store crowded with dogsand people, you would need more than one set of eyes to be able to monitorthem all. :}

Very true - and to clarify, my comment was intented as contructive criticism, not any sort of put-down. IOW, not saying you should have done something different, just "hmm, this was most likely part of it". :-) One of my agility classmates got bitten in a similar way- she walked close behind someone sitting with a calm-appearing dog lying next to the chair, and he lunged and bit her in the back of the leg.
I'm sure I somehow startled her and threatened her.

Well.. if she's fear aggressive, maybe. If she's territorial, protective, and/or dominant, it could also be that she wanted you out of what she thought was her territory, or thought you were a threat to her owners.
I move and walk quickly.

Given that the dog in question is an Aussie- a dog bred to be reactive to movement, and have instincts to control it- it's highly likely IMO that your quick movements were part of the equation.
My manager said, "It's because you smell like so many dogs." Could that be a factor? So that I'm more at risk from dog-aggressive dogs than people-aggressive dogs?

Nah. Not in my opinion. And you gave an example of why not yourself, when you mentioned separating the two pitbulls without incident.

We're at risk as dog trainers because we're usually in very close proximity to lots of strange dogs. Period.
I'd also wager that you aren't the first person this dog has bitten, either. And you probably won't be the last.

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to reply via e-mail
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