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That's the whole point of my long-winded story previously posted (re: the BC *** & Bodhi playing). Observations, and what I learned that day, sort of thing!
I move and walk quickly.

Given that the dog in question is an Aussie- a dog bred to be reactiveto movement, and have instincts to control it- it's highly likely IMO thatyour quick movements were part of the equation.

Having one of those kind of dogs, I tend to agree here. People said, "Belgians are a very reactive and alert breed." Even spending a great deal of time with several didn't prepare me for living with one on a daily basis. But, on the whole, I guess it's a good thing, in turn I've raised my own level of awareness about my dogs and surroundings. Bodhi is a softie in the protective business, but lightening quick to react to something around him (he can do a full-body flip around in quicker than the blink of an eye if some dog's nose surprises him). Shelly & The Boys
My manager said, "It's because you smell like so many dogs." Could that

be a

factor? So that I'm more at risk from dog-aggressive dogs than people-aggressive dogs?

I doubt it. I'm a dog walker so to a dog would almost always smell of other dogs. When I meet strange dogs (and I'm dogless) they often show an interest in sniffing my legs, but never has one shown aggression because of this.
Kate
I'm sure some of you other trainers and people who worked in vet clinics have been bitten. Did you get all weirded out, too?

I"ve been bitten once... about four years ago, at an agility trial. The dog was in it's x-pen, and we were crowded. I had my arms held above the x-pens moving through them, and the dog jumped up, biting me. It ripped my shirt, punctured the skin. Same dog also bit another person the same day. This was a World Team dog. :-/
Didn't weird me out. Dog have teeth. And they sometimes use them.
Debbie
My manager said, "It's because you smell like so many dogs." Could that be a factor? So that I'm more at risk from dog-aggressive dogs than people-aggressive dogs?

Dogs are smarter than that.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
My manager said, "It's because you smell like so many dogs." Could that be a factor? So that I'm more at risk from dog-aggressive dogs than people-aggressive dogs?[/nq]That's pure nonsense. You were in close quarters with a number of dogs who were stressed by the environment and you let your guard down by focusing on one dog and losing awareness of all the other dogs present. There's nothing more complicated to it than that. Remember that dogs can only vent stress through their mouths or their feet - you happened to be a convenient target for a pup who tends to vent stress through her mouth by nipping (rather than whining, barking, etc.) It happens.
I once had a BC client whose response to the approach of another dog was to drop back and nip the back of the calf of whoever was holding her lead - same kind of response as the bite you took. It's a symptom of a problem that needs to be addressed at the root, but the bite itself isn't the problem.
Lynn K.
DRAMA QUEEN!!!
Dogs do not love nor hate you, you came into her comfort zone and paid the price why blame yourself the dog would think no more of it, reality sucks hey?

David Sweeney
STI
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