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Well, the other thing is that I wouldn't be able to drive a 7' post.

that's why i suggested getting the cement anchor blocks that are made specifically for holding T-posts. no post whacking! if they'll support heavy, 6' chain link, then they should work fine for a temporary dog yard, right? another thing you might want to look at is livestock panels. the holes are small enough to contain dogs and they're rigid so they're easier to maneuver (than welded wire fence) if you're fencing solo.
(I always thought that was a dumb song - if he could follow her footprints to find her, why couldn't she follow her own footprints to get home?)

because then he couldn't rescue her and there would be no stupid song about it. HTH!
were Cinder running *up* to the fence from the outside, presumably to taunt the other dogs.

ha! smart (and eeevil) girl. thank goodness she didn't actually jump the fence. once they get it in their heads that they can do so, it's a zillion times harder to keep them contained.

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette>> http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com

Fear has many eyes and can see things underground. Miguel de Cervantes
Melinda, you have my sympathies. However, as I'm sure you ... gone over a 6' fence, specifically? Anybody ever gone under?

This is the first time I've had a Siberian escape. Ironically, my big escape artist was Greta, who had a ... months. I think I'm going to put a hotwire on the temporary fence. How do you keep your Siberians in?[/nq]We've been fairly lucky too, in that none of our Sibes is a climber. Boomer's a great digger and has uncovered the foundation of the house in several areas, but he's never tried to dig out. Neither he nor Mukluk has ever tried to escape. Tasha, on the other hand, has gotten out more times than I can count. Usually she's dug out, and one fenceline is lined with paving stones and cinder blocks. Recently she figured out how to push one side of the gate open, so we had some adustments made and hardware replaced.

She's been a challenge to keep in, but nothing compared to some Siberians I've heard about. We used hot wire at one time, but the dogs that didn't need it were the ones that didn't catch onto it and kept getting zapped. And of course, if we turned it off, she'd immediately dig out.
Tasha just had her annual seizure last night. It's the strangest thing; she has one a year, and they're almost a year apart.

Good luck!
Mustang Sally
you mentioned not having seen taller T-posts. i've seen them ... should be able to track taller ones down some where.

Well, the other thing is that I wouldn't be able to drive a 7' post. Being on the skinny, round-shouldered ... footprints to get home?) were Cinder running *up* to the fence from the outside, presumably to taunt the other dogs.

Heh. If that isn't a Siberian. Did you have any trouble catching her, or did she come to you?
Mustang Sally
Heh. If that isn't a Siberian. Did you have any trouble catching her, or did she come to you?

She came right to me both times. I do a lot of work (play, really) with my dogs on recall.
The dogs are not happy about having their yard shrunk down to about 1/8 of its former size. This is going to be a particular challenge for Emmett and Cinder, both of whom need to get their zoomies out a couple of times a day.

Your Tasha sounds like quite a pistol - a stereotypical Siberian. Do you medicate for her seizures?

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

In 1978, George Bush was warning that Social Security would go broke in 10 years
Tasha just had her annual seizure last night.

How severe a seizure?
It's the strangest thing; she has one a year, and they're almost a year apart.

Heh. Two years in a row now, I've had a gout attack at the same time of year. The last was last Tuesday and is pretty well finished. And no, it wasn't from beer - it was from "beer replacement": fruit juice and club soda. I have to stay away from exotic juice, like mango.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
Heh. Two years in a row now, I've had a gout attack at the same time of year. The last was last Tuesday and is pretty well

It's weird, my Elwood has seasonal seizures. They are much worse in fall and spring. We suspect that there may be something in those times of year that he is allergic to that is trigging a seizure. That's really the only thing that makes sense, because there are no temperature extremes at that time (the weather isn't terribly hot or freezing cold), and his seizures never occur when the temperature is going from hot to cold rapidly. This was an unusual winter, going from mid 50's to below freezing within a week, and having almost similar temp extremes within a few days. This doesn't trigger his seizures either.As it is, becuase his seizures are so seasonal, and he doesn't get many of them anymore at all (I think he might have had 3 last year total, and fewer than that the year before), he's not medicated. He also recovers very quickly (within a couple minutes after the seizure he's back to normal). He's also the perfect example of "shaking it off". After he has a seizure, and he's back on his feet because he needs to go poop really badly (he's lost control of his bladder and bowels before during a seizure), he does a full body shake and right after that he's fine.

Until he can shake himself, he's still wobbly and a bit disoriented. As soon as he shakes, he's good enough to go down the stairs and get outside without falling down or even being unbalanced.
I'm extremely lucky to have a dog who manages his seizures as well as he does. They could affect him much more strongly.
natalie

What fresh hell is this?
Dorothy Parker
Heh. If that isn't a Siberian. Did you have any trouble catching her, or did she come to you?

She came right to me both times. I do a lot of work (play, really) with my dogs on recall. ... times a day. Your Tasha sounds like quite a pistol - a stereotypical Siberian. Do you medicate for her seizures?

She's stereotypical of Sibes in many ways. She's also the best dog we've ever had. Did I ever tell the story here of when Matty the Greyhound got loose and was running around in the little lakeside town about 5 miles north? We got a call from the police there, who said they saw him and would wait until DH could get there so they could show him where Matty was sighted. DH took Tasha along, told her to find Matty, she put her nose to the ground, and off they went into the woods. DH thought, great, she thinks she's on an adventure, but after about 10 minutes, Tasha stuck her head into some undergrowth, and out popped Matty. She's incredibly intelligent.
We don't medicate any of our seizure dogs. Cruiser the IG has them more often than Tasha, but even he doesn't have them once a month. I've had a dog that couldn't go without seizure meds, and that's a different story, but when the seizures are infrequent, we prefer not to medicate unless/until absolutely necessary.
Mustang Sally
The "footprints in the snow" (I always thought that was a dumb song - if he could follow her footprints to find her, why couldn't she follow her own footprints to get home?)

Heh. I've always understood that the song was about a small child who wandered away and was overcome by the cold.. IOW that she was too young to have thought of that.
were Cinder running *up* to the fence from the outside, presumably to taunt the other dogs.

What an eeevil dog. :-D
Did I ever tell the story here of when Matty the Greyhound got loose and was running around in the ... adventure, but after about 10 minutes, Tasha stuck her head into some undergrowth, and out popped Matty. She's incredibly intelligent.

Wow! Good dog, Tasha!!
Catherine
& Zoe the cockerchow
& Queenie the goldenshep
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