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Tasha just had her annual seizure last night.

How severe a seizure?

Sorry, I missed this yesterday. Tasha has standard grand mal seizures, tonic/clonic with arching and paddling. She usually loses bladder control but not bowel, and sometimes vocalizes a little. DH said this one lasted 3 or 4 minutes, but I know it wasn't that long, probably more like 1 to 1 1/2 minutes. She recovers pretty quickly but is kind of freaked out afterward. You can tell this out because she wants to lay on top of her humans.
It's the strangest thing; she has one a year, and they're almost a year apart.

Heh. Two years in a row now, I've had a gout attack at the same time of year. The last ... it was from "beer replacement": fruit juice and club soda. I have to stay away from exotic juice, like mango.

Hmm. What is it about mango juice that gives you gout?

We've never been able to come up with a trigger for Tasha's seizures. Then again, we've never identified a trigger for any of our dogs' seizures.
Mustang Sally
Hmm. What is it about mango juice that gives you gout?

Exotic fructose. According to the doctor, drinking large amounts of fruit juice that I wasn't used to, in this case 4 litres of orange/mango over a week or so, caused the problem. I'm going back to beer.
We've never been able to come up with a trigger for Tasha's seizures. Then again, we've never identified a trigger for any of our dogs' seizures.

Rocky's now 2.5 years seizure-free. I'd love to know why.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
Hmm. What is it about mango juice that gives you gout?

Exotic fructose. According to the doctor, drinking large amounts of fruit juice that I wasn't used to, in this case 4 litres of orange/mango over a week or so, caused the problem. I'm going back to beer.

Heh. Four liters is rather a lot...
We've never been able to come up with a trigger ... never identified a trigger for any of our dogs' seizures.

Rocky's now 2.5 years seizure-free. I'd love to know why.

He's still on meds though, right?
Mustang Sally
Rocky's now 2.5 years seizure-free. I'd love to know why.

He's still on meds though, right?

Yes, though I decreased his KBr almost a year ago. It's time for more blood tests and to look at a possible PB reduction. Externally, he's healthy, though, and I don't want to screw things up - especially since he's back to having fun in agility.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
He's still on meds though, right?

Yes, though I decreased his KBr almost a year ago. It's time for more blood tests and to look at ... healthy, though, and I don't want to screw things up - especially since he's back to having fun in agility.

Sure, but 2 1/2 years is a good long time to be seizure-free, and definitely warrants exploring the possibility of medication reduction. Glad he's doing well physically and in agility.
I'm convinced that vets don't know why seizure activity acts the way it does in dogs. We've had a dog whose seizures kept getting worse and worse, and his body just ate up all the anti-epileptics. We have one that had infrequent seizures that suddenly became more frequent for no apparent reason, including a couple of clusters; we tried him on KBr but he did not tolerate it well at all, so we weaned him off, and he's been completely seizure-free for 3 years. Then there's Tasha, who has one seizure roughly every year. The vets have no idea of the reasons for any of these phenomena. I'm not saying they should, mind you - - just don't let 'em fool you if they say they do.

Mustang Sally
The vets have no idea of the reasons for any of these phenomena. I'm not saying they should, mind you - - just don't let 'em fool you if they say they do.

I've a good relationship with Rocky's vet - being the Client From Hell, I managed to convince him that the internet can be a good source of information if one can think critically.

My phenomenon: why is Rocky the last living epileptic dog from his litter? His brothers were put down over 2 years ago because of status seizures.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
The vets have no idea of the reasons for any ... don't let 'em fool you if they say they do.

I've a good relationship with Rocky's vet - being the Client From Hell, I managed to convince him that the internet can be a good source of information if one can think critically.

I think clients from hell are good for vets, just as patients from hell (I'm one, of course) are good for doctors. There is a ton of good veterinary and medical information available on the internet, and it's fairly easy to distinguish what is reliable from what isn't.
My phenomenon: why is Rocky the last living epileptic dog from his litter? His brothers were put down over 2 years ago because of status seizures.

Wow. How many pups were in his litter, and how many were epileptic? I guess it's just one of those "I dunno" things. If epilepsy often progresses in dogs, why do some dogs stop having seizures altogether? Why on earth would a dog have a single seizure once a year?

Mustang Sally
My phenomenon: why is Rocky the last living epileptic dog ... put down over 2 years ago because of status seizures.

Wow. How many pups were in his litter, and how many were epileptic?

Six in the litter, with only one female (who won her height in the 2003 NADAC Nationals) - three of the males had epilepsy.
I guess it's just one of those "I dunno" things. If epilepsy often progresses in dogs, why do some dogs stop having seizures altogether? Why on earth would a dog have a single seizure once a year?

On the epilepsy lists, one seizure a year seems to be relatively common.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
I guess it's just one of those "I dunno" things. ... would a dog have a single seizure once a year?

On the epilepsy lists, one seizure a year seems to be relatively common.

For dogs that have epilepsy, or for middle-aged plus dogs that start having that seizure pattern?
Mustang Sally
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