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What are you, the clock police? :}

i was going to mention it to Sally, myself. i guess you missed the explanation Matt and i gave of ... be seen because they'll either be marked read or will never be downloaded in the first place, based on date/time.

As it happens, I already knew, and had mentioned it to DH so he could fix it (computers are in his job description, not mine). I appreciate Jack mentioning it, and would have appreciated shelly mentioning it, because how would they have known whether or not I was aware of it? I find it annoying when someone else's clock is off (heh), and found it annoying that my email program thought current messages were yesterday's, etc.
Mustang Sally
If epilepsy often progresses in dogs, why do some dogs stop having seizures >altogether?

Perhaps it wasn't really "epilepsy" in the first place? Morag, as you may or may not remember, has had ONE ... the first known episode... yet she never had another, and over time the smaller episodes diminished and eventually disappeared, AFAICT.

Our Tasha is somewhat like this, except that she started having roughly annual seizures at about age 9, which is past the normal age of onset for idiopathic epilepsy. No diagnosis was made, but I certainly wouldn't consider her epileptic. What I was asking about are dogs that do fit the diagnostic criteria for idiopathic epilepsy and have seizures frequent enough to require medication, and then become seizure-free.
Why on earth would a dog have a single seizure once a year?

My previous epileptic dog - and he WAS epileptic; it was due to a head injury in a freak accident - never had more than one or two a year, usually triggered by heat.

But that's a dog that had epilepsy. I am still wondering why a dog that has never had epilepsy, a head injury or any kind of illness, other than a bout with MMM several years ago, would at age 9 begin having one seizure once a year.
Mustang Sally
But that's a dog that had epilepsy. I am still wondering why a dog that has never had epilepsy, a ... other than a bout with MMM several years ago, would at age 9 begin having one seizure once a year.

Greta started having seizures at 9 years old, but in her case the vet was able to diagnose a pituitary tumor. She was clustering, as well, and needed to remain medicated throughout the remainder of her life, so aside from the late onset her situation was very different from Tasha's.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

All you need to know about Social Security "reform": Your in-laws are going to have to live with you
But that's a dog that had epilepsy. I am still wondering why a dog that has never had epilepsy, a ... other than a bout with MMM several years ago, would at age 9 begin having one seizure once a year.[/nq]You don't have to have an externally noticeable head injury to have a brain injury. The brain is surrounded by fluid to keep it from banging up against the hard bones of the skull, but with enough force, it can still hit. A friend of mine was a military pilot who had to eject from a plane. He was put through hell by the military afterward because he was messing up on flight logs and having all kinds of weird problems. He never hit his head, his parachute had worked great, but scans showed brain damage where the force of ejection had knocked it around too much.

There can also be non-force brain injuries. Lack of oxygen to the brain could happen without any noticeable effects, but still cause a lot of damage. In fact, anoxic brain injuries are often the worst since they tend to be more pervasive over different parts of the brain than traumatic brain injuries.

Paula
"The smell of burning rubber chickens and
singed roller-skating chimps will teach a man to hate." swt
But that's a dog that had epilepsy. I am still ... at age 9 begin having one seizure once a year.

You don't have to have an externally noticeable head injury to have a brain injury. The brain is surrounded by ... often the worst since they tend to be more pervasive over different parts of the brain than traumatic brain injuries.

Believe me, I know that anoxic or hypoxic brain injuries are the worst (I work in med mal). It's kind of unusual to have a period of hypoxia or anoxia sufficient to cause brain damage without knowing it, though, and anoxia/hypoxia doesn't just happen without a cause. I suppose it's possible that Tasha bruised her brain during husky wrestling. I still think her seizure pattern is strange, though.

Mustang Sally
But that's a dog that had epilepsy. I am still ... at age 9 begin having one seizure once a year.

Greta started having seizures at 9 years old, but in her case the vet was able to diagnose a pituitary ... medicated throughout the remainder of her life, so aside from the late onset her situation was very different from Tasha's.

Yes. The vet mentioned the possibility of a brain tumor, but I think that's doubtful since it's been 2 1/2 years and there have been no signs or signs or symptoms of a brain tumor and no increase in the frequency of seizures. I doubt that the seizures are from low blood sugar, either, unless for some reason she experiences low blood sugar once a year. I guess it's just One Of Those Things.

How did the vet treat the pituitary tumor?
Mustang Sally
How did the vet treat the pituitary tumor?

We didn't, since he felt that there was no way to treat it without surgery and the surgery would have been very risky, especially for such an elderly dog. What we did instead was treat the pretty large cluster of symptoms, and we were fortunate to have an excellent clinician at Cornell who was both methodical and dogged in working through it all. In addition to the seizures she had a bunch of Cushingoid symptoms and unrelated to the tumor she was also
hypothyroid. So she was being medicated for excessive water consumption, a chronic UTI, hypothyroidism, and a couple of other things that escape my mind at the moment. In the last couple of years of her life she was permanently on 5 medications. She was a real trooper about going to the vet.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

All you need to know about Social Security "reform": Your in-laws are going to have to live with you
How did the vet treat the pituitary tumor?

We didn't, since he felt that there was no way to treat it without surgery and the surgery would have ... years of her life she was permanently on 5 medications. She was a real trooper about going to the vet.[/nq]I didn't think it would be treatable without surgery. I remember now that Greta had Cushingoid symptoms and a bunch of other problems. Did you have scans done, or do you know based on her symptoms whether the tumor grew? It's always helpful when a dog with multiple medical problems is good about going to the vet. Our first epileptic Greyhound, Spencer, was like that, but it could have been because he had some brain damage from an episode of status that occurred just after we got him, before his Pb level was even therapeutic, and he tended not to care much where he was.

He was on pretty high doses of Pb, too, along with KBr. Our other seizure dogs are alarmed if not frightened by their seizures, but I doubt Spencer was even aware of them. I remember one time when he was having a cluster, I'd given him the liquid Pb, and he doing his normal post-ictal wandering which sometimes lasted for hours. I dozed off on the couch and woke up to find him with his head stuck in the blinds on the front door. I have no idea how long he stood there like that, not making a sound or struggling, just standing there.
Tasha is a typical Siberian at the vet. No stoicism at all, and she sometimes starts to vocalize shortly after arrival. Our vet has techs do "farm calls" to draw blood for heartworm tests for a couple of clients with multiple dogs, and the Sibes are notorious, and laughed at, for their behavior. It wasn't fun when she had MMM.

Mustang Sally
I didn't think it would be treatable without surgery. I remember now that Greta had Cushingoid symptoms and a bunch of other problems. Did you have scans done, or do you know based on her symptoms whether the tumor grew?

We had a scan done at Cornell. We didn't have subsequent ones done because we knew we were going to continue to treat symptoms unless something changed radically, which never happened (other than the lower motor neuron problems, which nobody believed had anything to do with the mass).

Gosh, that dog had a mess of health problems. She was a dog among dogs, though.
I have no idea how long he stood there like that, not making a sound or struggling, just standing there.

I always feel kind of guilty about laughing at that sort of thing, but yeah, post-ictal behavior can be kind of odd. Greta used to get the zoomies which really wasn't like her at all. We were all sort of, like, "Go Greta, go!" Oh well.
Tasha is a typical Siberian at the vet. No stoicism at all, and she sometimes starts to vocalize shortly after ... multiple dogs, and the Sibes are notorious, and laughed at, for their behavior. It wasn't fun when she had MMM.

I've been very fortunate in that most of my dogs have been pretty stoical. Emmett was in for his annual checkup yesterday and was a real gentleman about some major palpations/manipulations (he paces at low speeds and I asked the vet to check him out). Duncan, however, got mean and was a real problem. Saber doesn't really misbehave but gets awfully vocal, which brings people running to see what's going on (he's got a very deep, very very loud rooroo).

The three Siberians from working lines are all very stoic about the vet. I have no idea if that's a genetic thing or what.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

All you need to know about Social Security "reform": Your in-laws are going to have to live with you
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