A friend showed me a clutch of four baby Boas he had and he said they were a type from the mountains in Arizona. I asked him to write the type and he couldn't spell it..the closest he could come was Harquahala Mtn..
If anyone knows anything about these, or where I can look to find out about them..or can make any sense of the spelling he was able to give..please tell me.
He said they are not commonly found in this area..I don't mean indigenously of course, I'm in PA..I mean in stores in the East.

Any information or arrows pointing toward information would be gratefully appreciated.
A friend showed me a clutch of four baby Boas he had and he said they were a type from the mountains in Arizona. I asked him to write the type and he couldn't spell it..the closest he could come was Harquahala Mtn..

Unfortunately that spelling could be of any mountain range in Arizona that has Indian rather than Spanish roots for it's name...or maybe the other way around...
Harcuvar Mountains, perhaps?
If anyone knows anything about these, or where I can look to find out about them..or can make any sense of the spelling he was able to give..please tell me.

Is this a subspecies of Rosy Boa?
E.g. smallish, chunky snake with stripes, very pretty small arrowhead shaped head with nice cat eyes. The stripes can be very distinct or somewhat broken up, but they are usually easily discernable as stripes. I think that most Arizona area rosy subspecies tend to be taupe/grey background with brick/orange stripes until you get down into the southern part of the state, where the colour scheme becomes more cream/black. However there is a large variation in colour within and between the subspecies, and there are more popping up every year with breeders offering specialty bred strains.
Any information or arrows pointing toward information would be gratefully appreciated.

This is a website that lists the subspecies that biologists generally recognize, they are good pictures:
http://www.bgsu.edu/departments/biology/facilities/herp/caresheetpages/rosy.html

Our snake is a L.g. roseofusca, but his stripes are slightly less broken and his colouring is a little more taupe/brick than the one in the picture. He had five clutchmates, and they were all slightly different. The breeder also had a clutch of four L.t.trivragata and they also differed in colour and pattern.
You will find other subspecies names on other sites - as is the case when it comes to subspecies, peeps keep arguing about them.

The genus name for this species has recently been changed to Charina, but you'll likely find more hits searching for Lichanura.

http://www.rosyboa.com/
Is an excellent site, with detailed natural history of the species, maps, and links. In their pictorial gallery they have good pics of regional variations as well as detailed identification keys and such.

Our rosy is a exceptionally good tempered animal, who spends a great deal of time in his substrate burrows. He has been easy to handle from day one but was a bit difficult to feed until we started heating up the prey animal well above room temperature. He would prefer to just sit with his nose out of the substrate, be fed the animal and pull it into his sekrit lair to devour, but we don't let him do that due to concerns about swallowing the substrate. Now that he's eating well, I've switched over to feeding him in a container, and it's going fine.
He's very crepuscular, and comes out very regularly to do snake antics for us, but rosies are relatively much more retiring than the average pet colubrid.
nj"rock me Azmadeus!"m
"And then they passed beyond mere words and
began to introduce the vegetable motif."
A friend showed me a clutch of four baby Boas ... couldn't spell it..the closest he could come was Harquahala Mtn..

And to follow up my reply, on one of the rosyboa.com links, I find a listing for a "Harquahala Mountains a.k.a. "Arizona Chocolate" Rosy Boa", from what I understand they are very close in looks to the Mexican Rosy subspecies.
Some on the group here (cat?) recently purchased an Arizona Chocolate RB.
nj"mmchocolate"m
"And then they passed beyond mere words and
began to introduce the vegetable motif."
The only Boa from this part of the United States (Harquahala Mountains) is a form of desert Rosy Boa.
Spit
Yup, Jill, thanks, this is exactly the snake. Nosedive into the substrate, lovely docile babything. Stripes.
Exactly as you describe.
So Tim DID spell the mountain chain right. He'll be oddly pleased to hear that.
Thanks! MSN Search yielded zero.
A friend showed me a clutch of four baby Boas he had and he said they were a type from the mountains in Arizona. I asked him to write the type and he couldn't spell it..the closest he could come was Harquahala Mtn..

Those'd be rosy boas (Lichanaura (or Charina, according to Dr. Kluge, but he's nuts) trivirgata). They're the only rosy boas found in Arizona (and also California, FWIW), so that makes it easy. And the spelling for the mountain range is correct, too...

Patrick Alexander
They are also called "Arizona Chocolates." They are a species of Rosy boa. Make nice pets, too. Emotion: smile
Ask him if he's selling any grin
-cat
They're the only rosy boas found in

I meant the only boas... oh well...
Patrick Alexander
Those'd be rosy boas (Lichanaura (or Charina, according to Dr. Kluge, but he's nuts)

I heard they're now considered "Pantherophis." Emotion: smile