My wife and I are preparing to breed our male Weimaraner. We will be doing this in two ways. First, we will be offering him through stud service and second, we will be acquiring a female within the next year.

I ordered the 5 generation pedigree for each of his parents from the AKC. I just now noticed that the same male was used three generations back on his father's side and two generations back on his mother's side. I am wondering how big of a deal this is.
Since Weimaraners are a somewhat rare breed, there is bound to be some inbreeding. I would like to know where professionals draw the line as to what is unacceptable, e.g. litters from the same litter-mates, litters between a parent and offspring, etc.
Also, if inbreeding is such a big issue, why doesn't the AKC have standards and prerequisites for registration, e.g. "We don't offer registration for inbred dogs."
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What is your goal in breeding him?
I ordered the 5 generation pedigree for each of his parents from the AKC.

You didn't have this from your breeder?
I just now noticed that the same male was used three generations back on his father's side and two generations back on his mother's side. I am wondering how big of a deal this is.

Not much.
Since Weimaraners are a somewhat rare breed,

Not really. According to the AKC website, Weimaraners rank 29 of 148 breeds in 2003 with 8,763 registrations.
What does your dog offer the breed?
Janet Boss
http://bestfriendsdogobedience.com /
My wife and I are preparing to breed our male Weimaraner. We will bedoing this in two ways. First, we ... a big issue, why doesn't the AKC havestandards and prerequisites for registration, e.g. "We don't offer registration for inbred dogs."

Inbreeding is not a good thing or a bad thing. You have to know what's behind those lines. Odds are, that one male that's appeared twice has some really strong positive traits in his lines. If you go farther back, you'll probably find he's got more relations.
However, that isn't inbreeding. It's a linebreeding. Inbreeding is mother/son, father/daughter, brother/sister. An inbreeding sets traits both good and bad. If there aren't any skeletons in those closets, an inbreeding can produce some awesome puppies.
More importantly, what does your dog provide the breed, and what skeletons are hiding in HIS closet? If someone linebreeds on him two or three generations down the road, are there any hidden traits that they may not be aware of?
Also, Weims are not "rare" by any stretch, they are quite popular in the show and field venues.

Emily Carroll
Fluttervale Labradors: www.fluttervale.com
CPG: www.geocities.com/cyberpetgame/
J1TROLL-
I see that a lot of what you do in this NG is antagonize people. Why don't you do everyone a favor and shut the *** up? Especially when you have NOTHING constructive to say.
-HP
uh no - pot - kettle - black
You aren't someone seriously interested in your breed or your dog, you're out to make a buck - it's very clear now - thanks for making that obvious.
Janet Boss
http://bestfriendsdogobedience.com /
E-
Thanks for the informative post. You bring up good points about the difference between line-breeding and in-breeding.
Our dog has a great temperament and is extremely smart.

Notice I said "somewhat rare" not "totally rare". Sure, in field competitions there are probably a representative number, just like there are a lot of cars that can do 0-60 in
We are finding that many folks would like Weims as pets, based on seeing our fine dogs, and are unable to find any. I myself searched for several months until I found a decent breeder and the perfect pups.

We go to many dog parks, beaches, etc. all over southern california. When we see lab after lab, etc. and NO other weims, that says to me that they are "somewhat rare" in our part of the world.
I don't think going by ranking in number of AKC registrations is a very reliable way of telling how popular/rare a dog is in society. For instance, let's say that 95% of all Weimaraners in the US are AKC registered, that would be 9736, based on J1TROLL's figure of 8763 in 2003. Further, let's say that only 20% of all Labs are AKC registered and maybe that is 5000 in
2003. That would mean that the real number of labs out there is really
25000. If you simply compared the AKC registrations, it would seem thatWeims are more popular than Labs when in reality what you are seeing is that Weim owners are more interested in AKC registration than Lab owners.

Lastly, not that it's a huge indicator, but when most people have no idea what breed our dogs are that says to me that it is "somewhat rare". If it was a hugely popular breed, more folks would say "Naturally, that's a Weimaraner."
-HP
J1TROLL- I see that a lot of what you do in this NG is antagonize people. Why don't you do everyone a favor and shut the *** up? Especially when you have NOTHING constructive to say. -HP

I must respectfully disagree:
She asked the most basic questions, quite politely.

There's a lot to learn before you can responsibly breed your boy. Can you hook up with a mentor who's accomplished a lot in the breed? That person can point you to how to make your boy more "marketable" as a stud:

Knowledgable *** owners will want to know that he's demonstrated that he looks and acts the way a Weim should - so you'll probably want to show him in the Conformation ring and also put some performance titles on him. If I were looking for a Weim puppy, I'd be seeking out pups whose parents had met the conformation standards and had some field titles on them.

You also have a number of health testing hurdles to pass - far above and beyond the run-of-the-mill vet check.
Try to connect with your local Weim club to get started on learning more...

And before you go calling a reasonable regular a troll, consider your own presentation and behaviour first.
Kate

and Storm, the FCR
What is obvious, troll, is that you have no idea what you are talking about. For you to make snap judgements about people and their intentions, in some cases after only reading a single post of theirs, shows that you are judgeMENTAL, rude, narrowminded, and think that you know it all. No one likes a "know it all". Thank YOU for clearing that up so I can add you to my ignore list as early as possible.
You are dismissed, ***.
-HP
We are finding that many folks would like Weims as pets, based on seeingour fine dogs, and are unable to ... that it is "somewhat rare". If it was a hugely popular breed, more folks would say "Naturally, that's a Weimaraner."[/nq]HP, just a word of caution. Boxers used to be pretty rare as pets in the grand scheme of things. They started gaining more attention, particularly from Westminster shows, and now the breed is suffering terrible overpopulation and euthanasia rates. Everyone started breeding them to supply the public with the Boxers they couldn't find easily. People feel in love with the look of the breed but knew nothing about what it took to live with, train & exercise them.

In the last 3 years the breed has been flooding shelters at all ages, particularly the age of 1-3 years. People want them, they buy them, they soon find out they can't just sit on their fannies and do nothing with them, so the dog becomes an untrained, attention-seeking, nuisance and is subsequently dumped at the nearest shelter. Out of 4-5 Boxer rescues in the state of NC alone, they can hardly make a dent in the overpopulation problem. For every one that's taken in by a rescue, several more die in shelters due to lack of space.

Used to be, 3 years ago, there was only 1.5 Boxer rescues in that state and while they stayed full, they were able to meet the demand. Now 4-5 (one of them is on-again-off-again) of them, with an average of 10 foster spaces each, can't handle the demand.
I point this out because I've heard that while Weims are wonderful dogs, they aren't for just the average person who doesn't want to put any time into training, socializing or exercising their dog. Same goes with most breeds but I think the general public tends to expect easy dogs that they can bring in, housetrain, and just live peacefully with, expecting the dog to occupy itself.

Tara
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