Hello -
The problem is one of our four indoors cats.
This cat, Sheba, is a female stray that I adopted and raised as a very small (
This cat is an extremely persistent pee-er outside the box. It is an intermittent but persistent behavior that we really can't get to the bottom of.
She does not "mark" vertical or freestanding objects with a spray. Rather, she always pees on horizontal surfaces on furniture, bedding, cushions, pillows, futon. It's only a matter of time before she has an eye for our $800 sofa.
As stated, there is *no* apparent cause of her "accidents". She has no problems with going to the bathroom otherwise. She gets plenty of attention and love, and plays quite often. She in turn is extremely loving and attention-seeking.
We've been using Feliway plugins AND spray. She just soaked a comforter on an extra bed that I sprayed with Feliway several times over the last week, where a 1/2 full plugin is right next to the bed in the wall socket.
One thing of note. When she was a kitten, I tended to keep her in the basement and the garage for long periods. I later found places she "marked". And she apparently went into heat at around 9 months and "did" the bed right before I got her fixed. One thought is that she got used to semi-wild behaviors as a kitten and will never change.

I am suspecting some sort of medical problem due to its persistence, but I am open to other interpretations.
What the hell do I do? Resign myself to a house that's an open cat *** toilet? Or keep this one cat in a steel cage because she can't ever be trusted?
Or has anyone had a cat do this and had a latent problem diagnosed?

As I said, this cat is quite loved and doesn't suffer from lack of attention.
Thanks!
1 2
Take her to see a vet who is knowledgeable about cats.She may have interstitial cystitis which causes painful urination. Medication is very helpful for this conditon. I suspect her problem is medical. You must also clean up the areas where she has urinated with an enzyme cleaner so she doesn't smell the area and is drawn back to it.
Gail
Gail,
Thaks for the lead and specific syndrome name. Our regular vet (a "country doc") has examined her (no biopsy, tho) and indicated that he believes that Sheba's problem is 100% behavioral.
Funny thing is, another one of our cats had a similar problem but was given to straining while urinating and spotting on surfaces outside the box; actually left some blood, too. She was diagnosed by the vet as having a uirnary tract infection. Medicine and a change of diet resulted in a perfect recovery and never a relapse.

I hope it's that easy with this cat!
Hello - The problem is one of our four indoors cats. This cat, Sheba, is a female stray that I ... a latent problem diagnosed? As I said, this cat is quite loved and doesn't suffer from lack of attention. Thanks!

The first thing you Always do is check for a urinary tract infection or other medical problem at the vets.
Karen
Gail, Thaks for the lead and specific syndrome name. Our regular vet (a "country doc") has examined her (no biopsy, ... change of diet resulted in a perfect recovery and never a relapse. I hope it's that easy with this cat!

Straining does not have to occur for it to be the problem. I hope you get her in soon.
Karen
Problems other than with the urinary tract can be the cause of a cat not using the litter box. Pain for one. Have the teeth been examined for decay, bleeding gums, tartar? Is it possible that the cat has arthritis? How's her vision? Her ears? Is she getting enough attention? Think along all possible lines so as not to limit yourself. Very often the cat is trying to tell you something. Usually it's a health problem. Other times something changed in the cat's life that made it unhappy or insecure. Has a loved one left? Is the cat alone all day?
"
/nq]
There are 2 web sites you should look at.
www.catsinternational.com for behavioral modification www.odorxit.com for odor elimination and control
Martin
There are 2 web sites you should look at. www.catsinternational.com for behavioral modification

This is a great resource but it's actually
http://www.catsinternational.org . The .com address is a software company. Thanks.
I just wanted to post a progress report on our cat Sheba. I hope this information helps someone else.
I wound up taking this kitty to a vet that our primary caregiver referred me to when one of our other cats had a problem last winter, in order to get a second opinion. Our main vet is a "country doc" who relies more on palpitating the animal than on formal tests and he had been insisting that the urination outside the box was behavorial and territorial. Feliway did no good, which lead me to suspect an "organic" problem.
The "second opinion" vet tested Sheba's urine and found evidence of high PH levels and some bladder inflamation. We got several prescriptions - Science Diet C/D formula, "Cosequin" (a sprinkle powder that is supposed to reduce inflammation), and an antidepressant (for behavior).
We did have two accidents in the month since we started that program, but one accident was when the kitty was left by herself when we were out of town, and in both cases we're unsure whether she was getting the full dose of the medications. Both accidents were awhile ago.

Today I took Sheba back for a follow up visit and we were pleased to find that there is no inflammation evident in her urine sample, and the PH balance is more normal.
So, the bottom line I see in this is: be persistent if you're running into atypical behavior, and consider getting a second opinion if you're not seeing results. I don't like to switch caregivers, so I needed a strong reason to do this. While the wetting problem was inconvenient (OK, a PITA), I was even more concerned that she was in discomfort or pain, or that the problem was a symptom of something worse. In this instance, bladder inflammation can lead to some really nasty problems if left unattended.
Thanks for the encouragement from this list to get this problem looked at!
Show more