My dog knows several commands and almost always ends up complying, but does anyone have tips on how to get her to do it quicker and more precisely?

She'll often sort of "collapse" into a down going through a sit and everything in between before she gets to a down. And worst of all, sometimes she doesn't do it with my first command. I know I should only give one so any tips on that would be appreciated as well.
My dog knows several commands and almost always ends up complying, but does anyone have tips on how to get her to do it quicker and more precisely?

Variable rewards. Instead of rewarding the dog everytime she complies, move to rewarding only for an improved behaviour (faster down, longer stay, etc.) If you have more than one dog, you set up a competition of sorts, rewarding the dog that complies faster/longer.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
My dog knows several commands and almost always ends up complying, butdoes anyone have tips on how to get her ... my first command. I know I should only give one so any tips on that would be appreciated as well.

How are you training her? Are you using treats or praise or punishing her for non-compliance or what?
And worst of all, sometimes she doesn't do it with my first command. I know I should only give one so any tips on that would be appreciated as well.

Give the command, then just stand there using a hand signal until she does it. Let her think about it. If she doesn't have a hand signal, make one up. If she blows you off and avoids eye contact, simply hold her on a short leash (not tight, but short so she can't go anywhere) somewhere there's nothing for her to sniff or see. Just stand there casually, ignoring her, until she realizes you're the only game in town. When she finally obeys, give big praise and let her free.
Dogs don't usually blow me off more than once. :}
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My dog knows several commands and almost always ends up complying, but does anyone have tips on how to get ... my first command. I know I should only give one so any tips on that would be appreciated as well.[/nq]You may well have taught her to respond the way she does, without intending to do so, by giving multiple commands, by being inconsistent, or by being unclear when you first taught the command. FWIW, I prefer to teach Down from a stand instead of a sit to make sure the dog understands the down position clearly and doesn't confuse it with the act of sitting, then downing. Go back to the beginning and think through how you want to communicate to the dog what you want her to do, then always signal the command the same way.

If she clearly knows what that means, and fails to comply, change what you are doing instead of just repeating the same thing that obviously isn't working. For example, if you've taught her to Sit by luring her nose with a treat and lightly running your hand down her back to tuck her bottom down, you probably will want to always ask her to Sit with the verbal command accompanied by the hand signal. If she doesn't Sit immediately, you would run your hand down her back to compel her to sit, and praise her when she does - without repeating your original command.
Lynn K.
My dog knows several commands and almost always ends up complying, butdoes anyone have tips on how to get her ... my first command. I know I should only give one so any tips on that would be appreciated as well.[/nq]You have to get her motivated to want to do it. Roz loves to play with a tug toy or stick etc, it's easy to motivate her to go through all her routines during play as part of play. I don't reward her for complying but make her down, sit, stay, come, roll over, heel etc all part of a game, as far as she's concerned it's all part of playing and because she's enjoying it then naturally she complies with eagerness. There's never any pressure, if she doesn't do something (rare) then I keep the game flowing and move onto another request, I never show any disappointment or displeasure as that could stifle her motivation, it's not about making her do anything but only about her wanting to do things.

Outside of play she still obeys as she doesn't have any reason not to, after all there is no intimidation or demands put on her, as far as she is concerned these things are still fun.

You have to arouse the dogs interest so it wants to pay "you" attention, I don't like to use food as it focuses the dogs attention on the food and away from "you", and food becomes the reward not the task, an object (stick, tug toy etc) is OK as it doesn't have to be a reward but is used as part of a game where the primary focus is on playing with "you" not the toy.

Paul
How are you training her? Are you using treats or praise or punishing her for non-compliance or what?

We got her from a rescue so we have no history of her before she got rescues, but she was obviously trained as a pup. So this is my first time sitting down and working with her. I use + reinforcement with correction when needed. If she's really bad I'll whoop her in the nose. . . . just kidding. No hitting at all. Emotion: smile
How are you training her? Are you using treats or praise or punishing her for non-compliance or what?

We got her from a rescue so we have no history of her before she got rescues, but she was ... If she's really bad I'll whoop her in the nose. . . . just kidding. No hitting at all. Emotion: smile

I would start not rewarding her when she doesnt' react with the speed you would like. Rewarding the dawdling behavior can be pretty counter productive. Trust me on this one

BethF, Anchorage, AK
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