Hi there,
I've just rescued 5 newts from the local-pet shop which have parasites as well as fungal disease. I have kept a couple of Cynops (Japanese Fire-bellies) for over 10 years so know how to take care of them but have never come across any disease or injury.
The newts I have rescued were labelled "Fire bellied" but cannot find an exact picture of them in my books. They look similar to Cynops so I assume they are subspecies or come from nearby areas.
Anyway, I digress. I brought them home, two of them have what I guess are fungal infections of the feet. I have put them in a tank (made slightly brackish) with a fish treatment that is antifungal and an antiseptic. I have kept a close eye on them for the past 5 hours and they seem fine. They all came with black mites which I have spent a long time removing carefully but obviously I will miss the odd one.
The problem I have is, am I doing the right thing? All the FAQ's mention specific chemicals rather than brand-names (which don't mention their constituent chemical names) so I do not know if I am using the right stuff. Is there any advice on how to kill those mites?
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I've just rescued 5 newts from the local-pet shop{{snipperoonie}} The problem I have is, am I doing the right thing?

Unfortunately, no. Purchasing obviously ill animals from pet stores is the wrong thing to do. It only proves to them that they can continue to neglect animals and still make a profit. Your heart is in the right place... but IMO it is better to lodge official complaints about the way the store cares for their animals (with their management and owners or corporation, then with your local animal control officer) then support them with your patronage. I know it can mean that the ones you don't buy might die... but if we all take the steps to stop the specific pet stores with the bad practices maybe we can make a better place for the next animals to live in.

You have my best wishes towards rehabilitating them. I'm interested to know the fish product you're using on amphibians, and if you note any side effects. I have much to learn about rehabbing amphibs!!

fr0glet
Hi there, I've just rescued 5 newts from the local-pet shop which have parasites as well as fungal disease. I have kept a couple of Cynops (Japanese

Do not keep amphibians in even "slightly brackish" water. You will end up with dehydrated amphibians. A salt water soak of 5-10 minutes followed by a rinse with dechlorinated water is acceptable, but will probably do little to rid them of the fungal infection.
Malachite green is an effective anti-fungal agent when used properly, but I don't believe it can be obtained without a perscription, and I know it shouldn't be used by someone who is unfamiliar with it. It is a carcinogen in humans and can be fatal to amphibs if improperly used.
Your best bet is to get these salamanders to a vet ASAP and get professional help. Herpvetconnection.com, arav.org and anapsid.org all have lists of herp vets by state. You can also call around to the local clinics and ask who treats herps. If that fails, ask us. Someone in your area might be able to recommend someone.
-Z
here is a site that might help ya if ya havnt checked it out already. alot of knowledgable people on the message boards too. http://www.caudata.org /
Hi there, I've just rescued 5 newts from the local-pet shop which have parasites as well as fungal disease.

I just recently saw an abstract concerning the treatment of frogs and tadpoles for a fungus, Batrachochytrium. They list several compounds that they tested, along with their results, although most of their testing was conducted using tadpoles. They do state that Itraconazole given orally or by bath has been used sucessfully on adults. Perhaps you will have to ask a veterinarian for a Rx of this compound if it is not readily available to the general public.
http://www.jcu.edu.au/school/phtm/PHTM/frogs/GJBerMar.htm
I know what you mean. However, I forced them to give them to me for free (rather than spending 50 quid) and I challenged them, "If you get anymore newts whatever the species then I will contact the RSPCA". I know the head of the section and they have previously been done by the RSPCA in regard to their rabbits. Since they made nothing then I doubt they will get them in again but I'll be watching.
You have my best wishes towards rehabilitating them. I'm interested toknow the fish product you're using on amphibians, and if you note any side effects. I have much to learn about rehabbing amphibs!!

They've spent 24 hours in a fish dosage of Methylene Blue (by King British). No ill effects but my concern is how to kill those damn mites and when do I know the fungus has gone so I can stop sticking chemicals in their water?
found this site http://www.klsnet.com/sickamph.html it doenst really say anything about external parasites tho. just internal Fungal Infections
Because of their moist environments, amphibians commonly acquire fungal infections, usually as a secondary infection following an injury or stress. Symptoms: inflammation or reddening of a small patch of skin (particularly in the area of a previous injury); white or yellow furry growths on skin (particularly in the area of a previous injury); skin sores, lesions, or other abnormally colored skin.
Treatment: In the early stages, a fungal infection can be treated with a topical antiseptic, such as diluted hydrogen peroxide (75% strength for adults, 50% for young or small individuals) or fungicides. Apply the treatment daily until cleared, and address the cause of this secondary infection. Another treatment often used is one 5-minute dip in a 2% solution of malachite green. If there is no improvement, the dip may be repeated up to three times (once a day), but arrangements should be made to have a vet attend to the animal after that.
{{snipperoonie}} Unfortunately, no. Purchasing obviously ill animals from pet stores is wrong thing to do.

I know what you mean. However, I forced them to give them to me for free

Yay! I love your threats!! Emotion: big smile
No ill effects but my concern is how to kill those damn mites and when do know the fungus has gone so I can stop sticking chemicals in their water?

The normal mite treatments I know of are all for reptiles, I'm sure the chemicals would risk severely damaging the delicate and porous skin of an amphibian. I wonder if the mineral oil trick would be safe for amphibs? I'd do it in a seperate container from wherever you're primarily keeping them... basically wipe down their bodies with a thin layer of mineral oil to suffocate the mites. Seems risky due to the unique nature of amphibian skin.

To minimize risks I'd just go with rinsing the newts with dechlorinated water and keeping them in a "hospital" tank, clean it often and remove visible mites regularly. It would surely be the safe way to go.

Wish I could help on the fungus. Does the medication you're using have a designated treatment period, like 2 weeks?
fr0glet
The normal mite treatments I know of are all for reptiles, I'm sure the chemicals would risk severely damaging the delicate and porous skin of an amphibian. I wonder if the mineral oil trick would be safe for amphibs? I'd

Nope. The mineral oil would interfere with skin respiration.

-Z
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