My Boa (approx 6' - 15 years old) has injured his nose/upper jaw by striking and missing and smashing his face into the glass. He also scraped it on the screen top, while subduing a large rat. He never did anything like that before. (I wonder about his eyesight.) I'm taking him to the vet tomorrow. Has anyone had a similar experience? What can I expect?
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My Boa (approx 6' - 15 years old) has injured his nose/upper jaw bystriking and missing and smashing his face ... wonder about his eyesight.) I'm taking him to the vettomorrow. Has anyone had a similar experience? What can I expect?

Boas strike at prey primarily via use of their heat sensors combined w/ smell using the tongue, and brining air particles back into the jacobson's organ where the brain processes. Eyesight is not that good to begin with. They can detect temperatures (and fluctuations) within a half degree.

My boas have done this on occasion just by the routine of feedings, and bringing my hand to the glass to open the cage. Luckily I haven't had any injuries thus far. However, I typically take them out of the cage for feeding with this being one of the reasons why.
I don't think there will be much that can be done about a broken jaw other than time.
For the scrape, use Neosporin.
Spit
I don't think there will be much that can be done about a broken jaw other than time. For the scrape, use Neosporin. Spit

And DON'T feed live prey!!!
Cindy
Cindy advises:
And DON'T feed live prey!!!<<[/nq]
I'm sure I will have to consider that.
I'll see what the vet says. Thanks.
Cindy advises: I'm sure I will have to consider that. I'll see what the vet says. Thanks.

Don't even consider it!! JUST DO IT!! Live prey will seriously injure the snake and it is almost always easier and cheaper to feed frozen/thawed. And for boas its particularly easy to switch from live to f/t

Snakeking
And for boas its particularly easy to switch from live to f/t Snakeking

???
Why do you say that?
fr0glet
And for boas its particularly easy to switch from live to f/t Snakeking

??? Why do you say that? fr0glet

Because they are voracious eaters and its true...its easy to switch boas from live to f/t
??? Why do you say that? fr0glet

Because they are voracious eaters and its true...its easy to switch boas from live to f/t

Matt, my dear, you and I both know that you've neither owned a boa nor switched one to frozen thawed. Nor do you have experience with their eating habits. I am a firm believer that appetite varies from snake to snake, and of course varies dramatically with the quality of their care. So saying they're voracious eaters is too broad, can't qualify all boas as voracious eaters.
That said, I also have never owned or cared for a boa... I have rosy boas but they don't count. They're different. I do have several pythons though and they have all been a challenge to get eating f/t.

In my experience those snakes who have heat pits on their face are harder to convert to frozen/thawed because its harder to get the rodent up to a warm enough temperature to trigger the feeding response, and keep it warm enough long enough for the snake to actually eat it.
Perhaps some boa breeders will step in here (helloo, snakelady!) and comment on the ease or difficulty of converting to f/t prey.

fr0glet
I have cared for many Boas in my time, and their feeding habits vary as much as most any snake. The Boa I have right now eats pre-killed just fine. Haven't tried frozen, I just kill for her. The last Boa I had, several years ago, was a completely different story. She would eat only live rats..and they had to be white rats at that! She would turn her nose up at dead rats..always did. Another refused all rats, and just wanted rabbits, pre killed. Sometimes even getting a small Boa to switch from mice to rats can be a real challenge. And I've had some that would only eat about every 6 weeks or so, where some eat weekly. Boas are usually good eaters, but they all have personalaties..just like people I suppose.
Roger
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