Hello all:
I have tried to find a similiar situation by searching Google before posting, but have not, so please forgive me if this has been asked and answered before.
My wife and I have adopted a pair of pound-puppies, which were found in a dumpster by the local animal rescue society. We got them at about 10 weeks of age, we estimate. The dogs are mixed-breed, brother and sister. The vet says they'll probably reach about 70 lbs.

We keep them indoors and are doing crate training, using the book "Good Owners, Great Dogs" as our reference. The dogs are happy and healthy and shooting up like weeds, about 4 1/2 months old now. They're curious and intelligent and very loving - we are obviously enamored of them!
However, the girl pup, Molly, has an interesting behavior that we're not sure what to do about. At feeding time, she will glare at Milo from across the room if he dares to eat at the same time she does. If he notices her glaring, he will move away from the food bowl until she is done eating (we have two food bowls, and they are across the room from each other). If he fails to notice her glaring at him, she will trot over and give him a cuff or bite him or growl at him. Sometimes he will take a mouthful of food and retreat from the room with it, and then sneak back in when he's done eating that mouthful for another.

It does not matter that there are two bowls - Mollie wants to control both of them. Neither dog has any problem with my wife and I - we can mess with their food bowls while they are eating, take the bowls away, pet them while they are eating, etc - no signs of aggression or growling or resentment.
The only other time we see this type of behavior is when we give them 'chewbles' type treats. They both like to go to their shared crate to eat them - but sometimes she will take his chewble away and sit on it, then eat hers.
He is a bit larger and much stronger than she is, but it is obvious that she dominates him. When they play-fight and wrassle in the back yard, he gets the better of her pretty often - but when she tops, he submits and when he tops, she keeps fighting.
Well, that's about it - as I said, they're pretty good dogs. I'm not sure what to do about this behavior - maybe it is just natural and should be tolerated? If not, I am unsure how to 'break' Mollie of this behavior.
I appreciate any advice you can give us!
Best Regards,
Bill Mattocks
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On 8 Mar 2005 04:02:25 -0800, "The Bill Mattocks"
They both like to go to their shared crate to eat them - but sometimes she will take his chewble away and sit on it, then eat hers.

They need separate crates. Feed them in separate crates and give them chewies in separate crates.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
photos
They need separate crates. Feed them in separate crates and give them chewies in separate crates.

yep. separate crates in separate areas where they can't see each other while they're eating or having chewies.

furthermore, where is the guy who used to say "don't let them *do* that!" when you need him? if the female is being a little bossypants, put a stop to it. it's one thing to let the dogs sort out their pack order themselves and another to let one dog bully the other. giving the boy the evil eye while he's eating is, in my opinion, bullying him. he should be allowed to eat in peace and she should learn to mind her manners.

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com / (updated dailyish, apparently)
in thread "The Bill Mattocks" whittled the following words:
Hello all: However, the girl pup, Molly, has an interesting behavior that we're not sure what to do about. At ... her glaring at him, she will trot over and give him a cuff or bite him or growl at him.

You LET her?
WHY??
Sometimes he
will take a mouthful of food and retreat from the room with it, and then sneak back in when he's done eating that mouthful for another.

He shouldn't have to eat like this.
It does not matter that there are two bowls - Mollie wants to control both of them.

Resource guarding. Don't let it get started, and don't allow it. This can bleed over to other issues later.
furthermore, where is the guy who used to say "don't let them *do* that!" when you need him? if the ... my opinion, bullying him. he should be allowed to eat in peace and she should learn to mind her manners.

Bob Maida, but I think many of use have said it off group as well! "knock that off" is one of my favorite phrases in dog training. It covers so many circumstances. I don't like bullies and wouldn't tolerate this.
Personally, I'd probably do side my side crates with a solid divider between them - the dogs know each other is right there, but no evil eye possibilities.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
photos
Bob Maida,

yep, that's the one!
but I think many of use have said it off group as well! "knock that off" is one of my favorite phrases in dog training. It covers so many circumstances.

"knock it off" and "watch out"/"move" are probably the most frequent commands in my house. and i bet you can guess which command is used most often with which dog!
I don't like bullies and wouldn't tolerate this.

it's a PITA to live with. harriet would be a terrible bully if she could get away with it. i have to put the smack-down on her or she'll micromanage elliott into a corner.
Personally, I'd probably do side my side crates with a solid divider between them - the dogs know each other is right there, but no evil eye possibilities.

that sounds like a reasonable solution to me, as long as the male isn't already so intimidated that he won't eat if she's physically that close to him. IOW, i'd take my cues on how much separation they need from the male, even though i'd've already put a halt to the female's bossypantsing.

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com / (updated dailyish, apparently)
They both like to go to their shared crate to ... take his chewble away and sit onit, then eat hers.

They need separate crates. Feed them in separate crates and givethem chewies in separate crates.

I understand. My wife and I were planning to get a second crate - they are rapidly outgrowing the one we have now. At first, I didn't want to get a crate at all - I grew up with dogs in the house, we had no crates (I still tend to call it a 'cage'), and we had no problems with 'em. However, I have to admit that it put a stop to all the nightly messes on the kitchen floor, etc. They even slept better, right away. So I changed my mind about that in a hurry - my wife was right.

Feed them in the crate? Doesn't that get a little messy?

Best Regards,
Bill Mattocks
We're sorting out how to put a stop to the 'bossypants' on the part of the female, that's part of what I'm asking, I guess. If I correct her in a loud voice, she ignores me, or just stops until I stop correcting. If I pick up the food bowl (either one or even both), they both just ignore me and wander off together. If I try to physically correct the female, the male comes to her rescue - or thinks it is playtime and jumps up on my licking my face, etc. I've tried pushing her back to her food bowl and him back to his, but they both enjoy this and think I'm doing some new daddy dance. Makes 'em all waggly.

I don't have a problem correcting either of them - when she has on occasion cornered the cat or is in the process of doing some other awful thing, I go grab her up by the scruff, give her the smack on the bottom, and scold her in a loud deep voice that has her groveling and apologizing in seconds, and her behavior has been improving on things like that. But I don't know exactly how to get her to stop this one.

Best Regards,
Bill Mattocks
On 8 Mar 2005 05:47:11 -0800, "The Bill Mattocks"
If I try to physically correct the female, the male comes to her rescue - or thinks it is playtime ... back to his, but they both enjoy this and think I'm doing some new daddy dance. Makes 'em all waggly.

Crates or tethering would stop this.
I don't have a problem correcting either of them - when she has on occasion cornered the cat or is ... deep voice that has her groveling and apologizing in seconds, and her behavior has been improving on things like that.

Stop smacking her on her bottom - it makes no sense. Leave leashes on the dogs so you can give a more timely and effective correction for cat chasing. Start using management and teaching the behavior you DO want, more than correcting behavior that's already happening. Strong leadership (which doesn't involve hitting or even correction necessarily) means that dogs don't even try this level of obnoxiousness, or not more than once.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
photos
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