I am moving from the UK to Canada in a couple of months with my Canadian wife and our 3 year-old labrador / staff / allsorts female - Roxy. For a few weeks at least we will be staying with my mother-in-law who has two Canadian Inuits - one male (5-7 years old) - Boomer, and one female (11-12 years old) - Matissa. We are concerned about how to introduce the two females to minimise the chance of a serious fight.

Matissa is alpha in the household and a fairly grumpy old thing. She is not a particuarly active animal, but on a previous occasion has taken a chunk out of another dog's ear when he was on her territory. After this scuffle, the dispute appeared to pass and she allowed the visiting dog to remain on the territory once she had asserted her dominance. Boomer is a good-natured animal who is not particularly active most of the time due to a hormone defficiency.
Roxy is a very active playful dog about the size of a small labrador, who loves to play with bigger dogs, and will submit to them, although she may wind them up to play with her. She can be distracted from almost any dog by waving/throwing a stick.
We will be arriving with Roxy from the airport, and she will undoubtedly be distressed having been locked up in a crate for 9 or 10 hours. My mother-in-law's home has quite a large house and garden with outdoor kennels for the dogs, although they are allowed indoors on the ground floor and sleep inside too. The back garden is fenced off to keep the dogs in, and the front garden & driveway are not.

The most common suggestion in this situation seems to be that the animals should be introduced off the territory. Unfortunately I cannot see how under the circumstances we could do this. We may be able to take the animals off the grounds to an adjacent field for a walk, but only on their leads. Roxy often growls at other dogs when she is on her lead, and certainly would not feel comfortable letting her off the lead in a strange new place which is not fenced in. It will be dark when we arrive and there are busy roads in the area.
The tools we have at our disposal are the house, a large fenced-in garden containing two tethers with long ropes, and a long driveway with large grassy verges (not fenced). What would be the best possible solution to introduce these dogs, in particular the two females, within these restrictions?
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Since this is only a temporary situation, any dog that I had concerns about, would be boarded, if they were mine.
Thanks. Yes, you have a point. It's a risk that cold be avoided, but at a price. I've never put my dog in kennels for longer than a few days, and I'm sure she would be very distressed by being put in one. In truth we don't know how long it will take to find accommodation so, she could be caged up for a good number of weeks, by which time she would be in a pretty terrible state.
It would also be very desirable for these dogs to be able to tolerate each other as that way Roxy can stay there when we have to go abroad.
I suppose I should also point out that Matissa, the older dog, has an owner - my sister-in-law, who has good dog handling skills, and to whom Matissa is very obedient. She will be there when we arrive, but not all the time.
The tools we have at our disposal are the house, a large fenced-in garden containing two tethers with long ropes, ... fenced). What would be the best possible solution to introduce these dogs, in particular the two females, within these restrictions?

I generally handle it out in the fenced yard. I go out there with the new dog and give him time for a pee and a poop, to stretch a bit, and decompress from the trip. Then I let the old dogs join him. Nobody's on a leash - the dogs need to be able to do the dog socialization thing without having their movement hindered. However, the dogs are heavily supervised and any inappropriate behavior is stopped immediately. In general I wouldn't leave them alone unsupervised together. I'd also give some thought right now to how you're going to handle feeding.
But, you know, Inuit dogs aren't exactly known for their affability or generosity. I'd have a backup plan (boarding kennel).

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community.
Thanks Melinda
That sounds like sensible advice.
I've never put my dog in kennels for longer than a few days, and I'm sure she would be very ... be caged up for a good number of weeks, by which time she would be in a pretty terrible state.

Which city are you moving to? Maybe someone here could recommend a kennel which wouldn't stress your dog. For example, I know a couple in my area.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
Toronto
Wow. There are some real fruitcakes on this newsgroup, but fortunately there are some sane helpful people too. I think I will go with Melinda's advice. If things don't go well and it is going to be too difficult to make sure the dogs get along, then we'll separate them for the night and make alternative arrangements. I'm prepared to tolerate a small scuffle if nobody gets badly injured and Roxy quickly learns what behaviour is required of her. I would rather this didn't happen though. We'll keep everything closely supervised, and put a stop to any inappropriate behaviour immediately.
What we won't do is put her in kennels for any longer than a few days. I appreciate that possibly some owners and dogs are able to tolerate longer stays in kennels, and that many kennels provide an excellent service. Here in Wales we have used a small independent kennels who only take a small number of dogs who they usually already know. The dogs get personal attention and because we know them we trust them to allow our dog to play and exercise with other dogs when appropriate. As I say though, we would never put her in kennels for a long period, because to the dog her life is with us, and when she is away from us she gets anxious, however good the kennels are. Her welfare is our responsibility, and she is part of the family.
I don't think much of people who insist that their way of treating their dogs is the only way to treat dogs. Our dog is far from perfectly trained (we got her from the city pound when she was 6 months old and had some behaviour problems), but she's a happy dog who gets plenty of love and exercise. IMO none of the miracle dog training methods work miracles. A lot of them have some good ideas, but the most important thing as far as I can see is that you treat your doggy companion with respect (and vice-versa) and that you have a good time together.
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