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Emotion: smile
I think being outside ATTENDED is great.

I think all cats should be able

to go outside on their property or on a lead, just like dogs. Ithink they get a great enjoyment out of it and lots of stimulation.

I can't argue with anything you've said here. !
I think cats benefit from that sense going out and coming back in , as all pets and humans do . It breaks the routine: every time a cat goes out , even just in the yard , it's a different experience every day , different smells , different weather , different texture's . I think it can ease the sense of limitation and frustration of restriction and gives them a sense of contentment.
I do not think cats belong roaming around the neighborhood any more than dogs should.

The majority of cats don't go very far, they don't really roam the neighbourhood though they do go in neighbouring gardens. Just to be pedantic, I could argue that even escorted, dogs can be a nuisance and dangerous, they bark and lunge at people, they leave trails of pee on the pavement , and off the lead they kill other animals , bite , fight. etc. its also dangerous for the dogs , they can get bitten and killed but other dogs etc In fact, I think they should be banned from streets and
gardens and kept indoors 24/7 There's no need for a dog to ever go outside, he'd be perfectly happy and safe indoors .

Alison
In answer's to the OP's questiom, it may well be an American thing to take the state of our furniture more seriously than the mental stimulation of our cat. American as I am, I have to come down on the British way of thinking here: that to amputate part of a pet's foot so your couch won't get scatched is a weird statement of values, and that I'm not terribly surprised that cats act out when they are confined to the inside of a house for their entire lives.

I have two cats, and yes, they have at least some daily access to our yard and the contingent yards every day, as do most of the cats on the block. I go through a process with each of some time exploring on a harness, then some supervised time outside, then only when I'm home, and they come in the evening for dinner and stay in till the morning. They know that it makes me unhappy when they go near the road, or if they don't come when I call them that I may curtail their outside time and they're very diligent about coming.

Can I guarantee their absolute safety at all times. Of course not. I can't guarantee my own absolute safety. But despite their cat tree and toys and perch and all the rest of it, they are bored and sad and unfit when totally confined to the house and active and zesty when they get some outside time. How would you want to live your life?The new cat spent 4 1/2 months in a no-kill shelter and frankly was so out of shape when she arrived that watching her remember how to jump and climb and hunt and run has been one of the most joyous things I've ever seen. When I got her, she would get winded chasing a lasar pointer around the house. She wasn't even two years old! It was absurd. Sure sometimes there may be no choice, but when there is, it seems to me a bad deal to make our fear of losing them and feeling emotional pain so very much more important than their need for stimulation and satisfaction and a full life.

Sure, I worry. But that's mostly about me and not about them. From what I can see, if I offered them 20 years never leaving the house compared with ten with some outside time, they'd take the ten in a heartbeat. As would I.
A very cheap shot, indeed. I also get sick of the "keep your cat in 24/7" brigade (well, it's not really a brigade. It's one poster that comes to mind). Everybody doesn't have to. Cats love the outdoors, and just like us, they benefit from sunshine, fresh air and stimuli. If the risks are relatively low, let them out.
If not, provide them sunny, open windows once in a while, toys and interactive play with you. It's a good compromise, and anybody can make an indoor home a good home.
Sherry
(Email Removed) enlightened us with...
I think cats benefit from that sense going out and coming back in , as all pets and humans do ... I think it can ease the sense of limitation and frustration of restriction and gives them a sense of contentment.

Absolutely!
I think all pets would benefit from this, not just cats and dogs. My neighbor puts his caged parakeets outside in nice weather for a few hours every day he can.
If I had a yard where I could build a safe enclosure that I knew my cats couldn't escape, I'd SO want to do that for them. Right now, they have a small but (they seem to think) fun enclosure on the balcony. They love to go out and watch the birds and when it's nice out, I pull it up to the door so they can come and go as they like.
I'm trying to get the two shy rescues to go out. They will go on the balcony, but get scared if I try to take them downstairs and outside. We're working on it. I think they would be even happier if they learned to enjoy being out more. They sure love the balcony.
I do not think cats belong roaming around the neighborhood any more than dogs should.

The majority of cats don't go very far, they don't really roam the neighbourhood though they do go in neighbouring gardens.

Yeah, I've read about that in the UK. Some people really hate it, others don't mind a bit.
I wouldn't mind, since I love cats, but some people seem to get very angry about it.
Just to be pedantic, I could argue that even escorted, dogs can be a nuisance and dangerous, they bark and ... 24/7 There's no need for a dog to ever go outside, he'd be perfectly happy and safe indoors .

hehe
Actually, this is quite true for people who are irresponsible and don't socialize their dogs. The other day I was in the pet store and someone had a dog there that was trying to attack the other dogs. It was muzzled. It was apparently a rescue that had been in a yard its whole lifeand they were trying to get it some socialization. I was a bit peeved, though, because I think I should be able to take my nice, friendly dog in the store without having to worry about her getting scared. But I felt bad for the dog.
My dog is trained so she doesn't potty on public property. I think that's rude to let your dog do that, personally. We have cement walks here, so she's trained to stay on the cement for walks and to not potty on cement.

~kaeli~
Those who jump off a bridge in Paris... are in Seine. http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace
A very cheap shot, indeed. I also get sick of the "keep your cat in 24/7" brigade (well, it's not ... and interactive play with you. It's a good compromise, and anybody can make an indoor home a good home. Sherry

Furthermore, I could also make the argument that by going outside with our cats and supervising their outdoor time, I'm spending more time per day with them than many people do who keep cats strictly inside 24/7. Our cats are leashed trained and we also have cat-proof fencing around our backyard. If it isn't safe to let cats roam unsupervised, many times it's still possible to provide safe outdoors access. Too often people don't think of these options.
Furthermore, I could also make the argument that by going outside with our cats and supervising their outdoor time, I'm ... roam unsupervised, many times it's still possible to provide safe outdoors access. Too often people don't think of these options.

When I was in the market to buy a house, I had always planned to move somewhere they could go out. That didn't work out (I'd really have had to move out of the area, or to the country) and I really felt bad. One day I'd like to build a true garden like I see pictures of from some UK gardens. My yard is fenced but they could easily get out the way it is now. The enclosure will have to do for now.

Cheryl
If it's legal to abort an unborn child (fetus), then there should be no question that declawing cats or any other animal should be legal.

Your logic here is completely lacking.

How so?
Furthermore, I could also make the argument that by going outside with our cats and supervising their outdoor time, I'm ... roam unsupervised, many times it's still possible to provide safe outdoors access. Too often people don't think of these options.

I agree. It's great also when they have an enclosure I think cats really enjoy basking in the fresh air and sun.
Sherry
A fetus is a parasite.

That's a bizarre statement.

Hardly. The statement is quite accurate.
A fetus has been shown to have the effects
of a parasite in the first few weeks, but these dissipate (such as morning sickness). Having the effects* of a parasite does not make it an *actual parasite. Wow. What a leap in logic.

"Effects" mean nothing. The fact is a fetus lives off the host but contributes nothing to the survival of the host.. That is a parasite...
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