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Not so. Amputation without benefit is mayhem. A fetus is a parasite.

A fetus is not a parasite.

It sure is..
But if you argue that fetuses are
parasites, then I can also argue that cats are parasites.

Not so. Cats don't feed off us... We feed the cats...
By the way,
declawing have benefits such as the owner's convenience, savings realized by not replacing furniture all the time, etc. You just don't happen to agree with them. But you can't deny they are benefits.

I don't think you understand the principal. Declawing provides no benefit for the cat... Thus amputation without benefit is mayhem.
Question for those who have outside enclosures - Do you put down outdoor carpeting (I've seen some pictures with this in the enclosure)? Do fleas get into the carpeting? How do you handle the flea (and subsequent tape worm) dilemma? I've had to use flea products on my cats before but don't think I'd want them on these products all the time.
Wendy
A very cheap shot, indeed. I also get sick of the "keep your cat in 24/7" brigade (well, it's not ... toys and interactive play with you. It's a good compromise, and anybody can make an indoorhome a good home. Sherry

Furthermore, I could also make the argument that by going outside with our cats
and supervising their outdoor time, I'm spending more time per day with them than many people do who keep cats strictly inside 24/7. Our cats are leashed trained and we also have cat-proof fencing around our backyard. If it isn't safe to let cats roam unsupervised, many times it's still possible to provide
safe outdoors access. Too often people don't think of these options.
Question for those who have outside enclosures - Do you put down outdoor carpeting (I've seen some pictures with this ... use flea products on my cats before but don't think I'd want them on these products all the time. Wendy

The one we built, the floor was just carpet, and it extended out several feet onto grass. The only flea problems she's had were very mild, and only in the latter part of the summer. So there is* somewhat of a risk of fleas/tapeworms, but I think the benefits to the cat are worth it. They *really love their sunroom, and stay out there a lot.
Sherry
Question for those who have outside enclosures - Do you put down outdoor carpeting (I've seen some pictures with this ... to use flea products on my cats before but don't thinkI'd want them on these products all the time. Wendy

The one we built, the floor was just carpet, and it extended out several feet
onto grass. The only flea problems she's had were very mild, and only in the latter part of the summer. So there *is* somewhat of a risk of fleas/tapeworms,
but I think the benefits to the cat are worth it. They really love their sunroom, and stay out there a lot.
Sherry
I've gotta say I don't miss the flea/tapeworm mess. Barfing cats (from tapeworm) isn't my idea of a good time. I don't need the carpet infested with them again either. One of our cats seems to be sensitive to flea bites (gets bald spots where the bites are) so I'd have to treat almost year round. I was hoping the fleas might not like the "astroturf" type carpet and maybe I could rig up some kind of enclosure.
Hi Kaeli,
Yeah, I've read about that in the UK. Some people really hate it,others don't mind a bit. I wouldn't mind, since I love cats, but some people seem to get very angry about it.

I think they hate the cats messing in the soil and chasing the birds . This is more of a social issue; though you do get a few nutters, like the one you mentioned in another thread that trapped the cats but that is rare. Maybe the US has more of a community spiritthan the UK.! One of my neighbours cats uses Kims toilet earth patch and a tom used to spray up my honeysuckle by my back door . The second annoyed me because the owner was irresponsible for not neutering.
My dog is trained so she doesn't potty on public property. I think that's rude to let your dog do that, personally. We have cementwalks here, so she's trained to stay on the cement for walks and to notpotty on cement.

Was it hard to train her to do that? I had problems with Dibby weeing indoors when I first adopted him so I'm just pleased he goes outside. He only does tiny wees though ,cos he's so small. Alison
"Cheryl" (Email Removed) wrote in message > When I was in the market to buy a house, I had always planned to move
somewhere they could go out. That didn't work out (I'd really havehad to move out of the area, or to ... but they could easily get out the way it is now.The enclosure will have to do for now. Cheryl

Hi Cheryl ,
The gardens in the UK I expect are much smaller than Us ones. My own back garden is small about 40ft by 40ft . It depends when the houses were built . The older the house the bigger the garden . Most people value their privacy and put up larch panel fencing. It would be easy to attach an overhang. I think if a cat was used to going outdoors in the yard , if he escaped he wouldn't panic and I doubt if he would go far he would know his territory and come back . For those that don't know, in the UK we refer to our yards as gardens even though it could be just a concrete patch . In the south , it's an insult to call someone's garden, a yard!
Alison
I was just wondering but is de-clawing cats particular to the US? I live in the UK and until I ... against the idea but I have never heard of anyone here who has ever come across a de-clawed cat. Jeannie

Yeah, we love it over here. A lot of us guys like declawin' our bitches too! And I am not speaking of dogs when I say that.

Cropwalk2004
Furthermore the "parasite" must produce hormones to defeat the efforts of the maternal lymphocytes to reject it; otherwise the mother's body will treat it like any other foreign entity and eliminate it.
The gardens in the UK I expect are much smaller than Us ones. My own back garden is small about ... be just a concrete patch . In the south , it's an insult to call someone's garden, a yard! Alison[/nq]We have a small yard (or garden, as you say) as well, but it's well fenced. You bring up a good point about a cat knowing its territory, however. Our cats go out in our backyard and also go for walks on a leash around the front. They consider their territory in terms of walks as the area about two houses down from us and about four houses north (why this is as far as they ever want to go, I don't know.) Since they know the area (and our neighbors know us and our cats because they see us out walking them) I feel more secure that should they ever get out unnoticed (say, by a delivery man or something) they know where they live, and if the neighbors saw them outside alone, they would tell us.

Personally I prefer this to thinking they would be so panicked by the outdoor environment, as some indoor only cats may be, that they wouldn't know what to do or where to go, and could run off who knows where.
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