I have 5YO entire male red Australian Kelpie. He is in good health, well trained and well exercised and doesn't have any anti-social habits.

If I (or a member of the family) sit down and cross my legs he will come and stand over the foot of the upper leg. He doesn't rub any particular part of him or do anything else, he just stands there and looks sort of mildly happy. If you move the foot he will move with it. He doesn't try to mount me, hump the foot or anything else like that. This doesn't bother me but I am just curious about why he does it.
David
I have 5YO entire male red Australian Kelpie. He is in good health, well trained and well exercised and doesn't ... foot or anything else like that. This doesn't bother me but I am just curious about why he does it.

I don't know why, either. Maybe he wants you to scratch his belly with your foot?
My yellow Lab has a similar habit - he pushes himself under the leg, so that I'm sitting there with one leg extended over his back. He usually tries to position himself so that his butt is within scratching distance. And there we sit, my leg resting on top of his back, me scritching the base of his tail, him wagging that tail with a big sloppy grin on his face.
FurPaw

I see no reason to reply to anything typed above 90 decibels.

To reply, unleash the dog
Because it feels good. Seriously, mild pressure upward on the lower abdomen is a calming signal. Did you ever notice a dog calm another one that's stressed by pushing up on their belly with muzzle?

Lynn K.
Because it feels good. Seriously, mild pressure upward on the lower abdomen is a calming signal. Did you ever notice a dog calm another one that's stressed by pushing up on their belly with muzzle? Lynn K.
Thanks, that is interesting. Do you have any references as to where I could learn more about it?
David
Do you have any references as to where I could learn more about it?

I know it's in Linda Tellington-Jones' books on TTouch and it's also probably in Turgid Rugaas' "Calming Signals".
Lynn K.