Hello all!
this is my first post here, and i have a question for you all.

my partner and i are wanting to get a dog, so we have been doing some research into breeds for our climate, yard and house size. we have it narrowed down to beagles.my question is..what do you feel, if any, is the difference between dogs raised in the home vs. dogs who are kennel raised? the breeders around here all seem to kennel raise, except for one, who raises her very small pack in her home. i, myself, am not that thrilled with kennel raising, having NEVER gotten a dog raised in that manner. all of my dogs have always been house raised, even those i have had that were pure breeds. basically, i am telling my partner that there is an extreme difference when it comes to the ease of house training and basic manners, and my partner disagrees with that.

my dogs are intended to be family members, who live with their people, sleep in the house, eat in the house, go on trips, come into work, sleep on the couch if they want to, or jump into bed if they feel a tad lonely at night. for that purpose, i feel that a house raised dog is better fit for that, than one raised in a kennel, who can get confused by the chaos that goes on in a home, ie: phones ringing, radios on, tv on, while dinner is being cooked in one room, people are calling out to each other from different rooms, walking around, carrying laundry...all at about the same time.

rather then spending the first few weeks getting our new family member used to being inside a house, i would like to get to know who the little bugger is, show him who we are, play and teach him where to go whizz outside..if you get my drift.before anyone starts a rant..let me just say, i have had 7 dogs who have all lived long, healthy, well trained lives...i have never hit, thumped, screamed at (with one exception, but that involved a puppy, a fast moving truck and a run-away ball on a windy day, so i think i am excused for panicing for a moment, i was also 12 at the time), used a prong collar, shock collar, electric fence or anything else on ANY of my dogs, EVER...i have had a golden/husky mix (kira), a springer spaniel (mighty mini max, also called maxi pad), irish setter (gretchen), american bulldog mix (skyloh), a golden (chaucer), and 2 rotties (sophie and simon).

ALL of whom were dogs who were well mannered in public, played great with other dogs, children, elderly and even developmentaly disabled persons, so i very much DON'T need to be told how to help a great animal really shine.
as you can all see, i have been reading posts here, and sorta already know that i will have to be very clear with what i say. i was shown this newgroup by someone else who has a bit of experience with a guide one of you has posted, so i hope someone here can give me some good examples of kennel vs. home raising.
thanks,
megan
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Hi Megan ,
Stick to your guns , you know you are right . I would beg a pup from the woman who homes raises them .

Alison
my question is..what do you feel, if any, is the difference between dogs raised in the home vs. dogs who are kennel raised?

i would think it would be very difficult to give a puppy the proper amount of socialization if it lives in a kennel. i suppose it could happen, but it isn't likely.
what other criteria are you using in your search for the right breeder? have you checked out Diane Blackman's website? she has some very good pointers:
http://www.dog-play.com/ethics.html .
i think you'll find that, once you start seriously researching breeders, the kennel vs. home-raised issue will disappear because the breeders who kennel-raise their pups will likely self-deselect themselves from your list of viable options for other reasons.

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
my question is..what do you feel, if any, is the difference between dogs raised in the home vs. dogs who are kennel raised?

i would think it would be very difficult to give a puppy the proper amount of socialization if it lives ... because the breeders who kennel-raise their pups will likely self-deselect themselves from your list of viable options for other reasons.

Question...although I'd not consider a pup for myself (ie: a herding breed) from anything other than a home-raised situation (maybe kenneled at night, but in the home throughout the day at the very least), I wonder if this might vary due to the breed.
Mostly what comes to mind are the hounds that tend to live/run in packs (Beagles, Foxhounds, Harriers, Coonhounds?, Bloodhounds). Personally, I cannot imagine a litter/houseful of Bloodhounds w/o teflon coating and/or waterproofing my entire home! Of course, that is why although I like & appreciate Bloodhounds for what they are, I'd not ever have one. :-)
Just curious...
Provided all of the other factors (socializing, health testing, etc.) are done, of course a home-raised would be ideal. But I'm just wondering if ideals through breeds are somewhat interchangeable. As an example: if someone was specifically looking for an Anatolian for flock guarding, would they want a dog that was super-socialized to human stuff, or rather raised w/ flock & littermates other dogs? Shelly & The Boys
Question...although I'd not consider a pup for myself (ie: a herding breed) from anything other than a home-raised situation (maybe kenneled at night, but in the home throughout the day at the very least), I wonder if this might vary due to the breed.
I think it also depends on the nature of the dog's interactions with its owner. I can't be certain, but it's highly unlikely that Fly grew up in a house because it's just not the way things are done with working dogs over there (on the other hand, I know plenty of people with working Border Collies in the States whose dogs live in the house but we Americans have a reputation for loving our dogs too much). However, she was intensively raised and trained to work with a human handler and she's so good at interacting both with people and with other dogs that she clearly either got the socialization she needed, or has a temperament so good that it doesn't matter how much socialization she got.

Melanie Lee Chang > Form ever follows function. Departments of Anthropology and Biology >
University of Pennsylvania > Louis Sullivan (Email Removed) >
my partner and i are wanting to get a dog, so we have been doing some research into breeds for ... do you feel, if any, is the difference between dogs raised in the home vs. dogs who are kennel raised?

In my breed, there won't be a major difference. While my breeder raises her puppies in the house (up until a certain point, where they do live in the kennels), I do know that it is not standard for all breeders.

Provided the breeder spends as much time with their puppies outside as they would inside, there won't be a problem with socialization. Puppies are also very adaptable and willing to learn. Most breeders do not actually start your puppy's housebreaking process, and Beagles are notorious for being semi-difficult to housebreak, so there wouldn't be a major difference if you are looking for a younger puppy.
~Emily
Mostly what comes to mind are the hounds that tend to live/run in packs (Beagles, Foxhounds, Harriers, Coonhounds?, Bloodhounds).

Lynn is going to have to speak on the Bloodhound issue she knows more about them than I but as far as I'm concerned it depends on whether you are looking for a housepet, or want a dog that's strictly a worker. There's proportionately a FAR greater number of people in the former group than in the latter.
JFWIW,
Dianne
basically, i am telling my partner that there is an extreme difference when it comes to the ease of house training and basic manners, and my partner disagrees with that.

Simply put you are right and your partner is wrong. Puppies are extremely impressionable between 3 and 8 weeks of age; their experiences at this time make a great deal of difference to how easily they adapt to life as a housepet. So if you want a housepet, get a dog that has been raised to be one; it's as basic as that.
I did an somewhat inadvertent experiment on this issue a few years ago. I took in most of a litter of puppies whose breeder was not adequately socializing them they were in the house, but were not being handled enough nor being exposed to new things. I had five of the puppies from 6 to 8 weeks of age; one remained with his breeder. When the pups came to me, they were shy, acted fearful of people, and were completely intimidated by new experiences.

I socialized the heck out of those puppies I put them literally underfoot in the kitchen so that they got to hear lots of noise, gave them tons of new toys for them to explore and play with, of course handled them a LOT, took them to a dozen or more new places, and brought other people over to play with them too.
When the five puppies left me, they were all happy, confident and outgoing the exact opposite of what they had been two weeks earlier. And the ones I was able to follow up on remain that way years later.
The other puppy, though... the one that remained with his breeder... poor thing. I saw him again at about 8 months of age and he was a nerve bag. He was literally sitting on his owner's lap shivering and kept hiding his face. He could not at all deal with the situation he was in (someone's backyard with a moderate number of people and dogs around). He was absolutely terrified and pathetic. I only wish he could've come to me for socialization like the other puppies did :-(.
my dogs, EVER...i have had a golden/husky mix (kira), a springer spaniel (mighty mini max, also called maxi pad),

OK you've GOT to explain THAT nickname !!
And BTW welcome to rpd*.
Dianne
Provided all of the other factors (socializing, health testing, etc.) are done, of course a home-raised would be ideal. But ... would they want a dog that was super-socialized to human stuff, or rather raised w/ flock & littermates other dogs?

LGBs are the potential rare exception. i don't know much about livestock guardian breeds, but i would assume that if you were searching for one with the intent of its actually working as a LG, you'd want a pup from a litter that had been imprinted on and socialized with the appropriate livestock. the idea is for the dog to look to the flock/herd as it's pack, so socializing it in the home with humans, at least to the extent that would be desirable for a pet dog, would work against that goal.
the same isn't true of pets, regardless of the breed. a good breeder will want to do everything possible to ensure that the dogs s/he breeds will be successful members of their new families. i may be missing something, but i don't see any reason why pack hunting breeds shouldn't have the same early socialization a pet should get.

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
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