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"Jodi" (Email Removed) composed these thoughts and posted them
What is the story behind your dog that causes her to be so fearful and unsocialised?

Are you seriously asking me that question?Yes I was. I was wondering if you were rehabbing a dog, socializing a puppyh, or what was going on.

I'm not being sarcastic, only inquisitive. My dogs get stormed by kids all the time, and I instruct the kids on approaching a dog SAFELY, because how they did it was NOT safe. For the reasons you've mentioned. But then, even though I have no children myself, I take my dogs into classroom settings to teach children pet care and dog safety. I would have hoped you would have discussed this with the mom, why her children's appraoch is NOT safe.
I have 3 week old puppies, and in a few minutes, those puppies will be swarmed with a herd of kids. It's a part of their socialization prpject.
I really hope you're being sarcastic and I just can't read the tone. Because: A) I would be fearful and ... yell at it, and try to touch it is wrong.Err you are assuming a whole lot from a simple question...

See above.
But I also think this is something a responsible dog owner works on.
I was simply asking the background of Tallhua and then everyone goes off on a *** tangent.
I do. I think it's
"Perry Templeton" (Email Removed) composed these thoughts and posted them
Out of my three dogs...one (Lucee) would be completely oblivious to anyone, she would be completely unconcerned, almost aloof...one (Dixie) ... are basic behaviors that are innate... A question might be to the mother...as to the manners of her kids.. Perry

Perry has met my dogs, She knows my dogs would wag their tails off in joy to see all those kids coming at her. She'd be in doggy heaven.

All the same, Those children needed taught WHY what they did was wrong. If you didn't tell them, and the mother, nobody faired anybetter, and those children are set up for a more unpleasant situation in the future.
Actually, nowdays..to be human AND grown up and surrounded by displaced idjuts...I'd* be alarmed and snarling ...and *I'mvery socialized and spot on trained!! Emotion: smile
I think what I got from the post was the gross lack of manners in the kids, the way the op was written indicates the "rush of it all" and in the best of situations, it would unsettle most, if not all. In some neighborhoods, that swarming is a tactic to disarm the unsuspecting...I'd be wary, too. Perry
FWIW, my dogs would be unhappy at 5 screaming dogs running at them too.

I suspect however that no kid with half a brain would do that. I often find that kids have no qualms running right up to Pan, but very few ever do that to Khan. Then again, a lot of kids think that he's a wolf, which might account for the hesitation.
I live in an adult world and don't have kids myself. They do great with kids, but they aren't habituated to them.

The dog park is sandwiched between soccer fields. We get plenty of exposure to kids of all ages and sizes, and all the whooping and hollering that accompanies them. When groups of kids want to pet the dogs, I stop them before they get close to the dogs, let them know that the dogs will let them pet them if they go about it nicely, and have them line up so they can pet the dogs, one at a time. They can even hug or kiss the dogs if they like, just not all at once, and only under my direction and supervision. The dogs respond really well to this, although Khan does get sick of it after a while and just wants to go meet the dogs.
Suja
Err you are assuming a whole lot from a simple question...

It wasn't a simple question. It was a loaded question.
All the same, Those children needed taught WHY what they did was wrong. If you didn't tell them, and the mother, nobody faired anybetter, and those children are set up for a more unpleasant situation in the future.

my dog love, love, loves kids, and would walk over hot coals to play with them. but, i'm not sure she would be enthusiastic about five of them running and screaming and bouncing toward her. that's a bit much to ask, i think. i know *i* wouldn't appreciate being swarmed by a hoard of hyper kids.
my dog would, at the very worst, hang back from such an encounter. that's okay with me. it's my job to tell the kids to slow down, back off, and settle down. it is my job to protect my dog from random children. it is my job to make sure that my dog is kid safe (and she is, to the degree that it's possible to make a dog kid safe). it is not my job, however, to train someone else's kids for them. i'm sorry, but i draw the line there.

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net
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"Jodi" (Email Removed) composed these thoughts and posted them
Err you are assuming a whole lot from a simple question...

It wasn't a simple question. It was a loaded question.

It wasn't meant that way. But I'll make sure not to ask you any questions in the future so as to avoid misinterpretation. plonk
I was simply asking the background of Tallhua and then everyone goes off on a *** tangent.[/nq]It's not that you were asking, but how you were asking. The addition of a little word like "so" can change meaning in a sentence significantly, for example. Before that, the sentence could be seen as somewhat hostile or not depending on interpretation. "What is it that makes your dog fearful?" could be answered with "nothing" or "only the kind of thing that would scare any other dog" and does not assume that there is a judgment being passed on the dog.

Some might still read it that way because it assumes fearfulness and there is some expectation that the question would not be asked if the person asking did not think there was something abnormal about the fear or socialization (or lack thereof), but at least there would be an argument that it was not a loaded question and the person asking it simply wanted information without any judgment. Once you add those two little letters, it transforms the question into a statement of judgment on the dog and its owner that makes that judgment more central than any request for information.

Most people would mean for a jab to be felt from the way you worded your question if they asked it that way. For all I know, you didn't mean it that way, but you should be aware that is the way it comes across or you will continue to be surprised at "*** tangents" that the majority of the population would say you instigated as the main focus of your remarks. Since you're not likely to change the wider culture, it is easier to fix the impression by conforming to the language norms of the culture and work within them to form non-loaded questions that will read to the greater culture as noncombative, non-bitchy requests for information.

Paula
Persons with names like Sierra, Sequoia, Auburn, and Rainbow can't sing the Blues no matter how many men they shoot in Memphis.
Parents need to teach their kids that you just don't go up to a dog without asking if it's ok and they certainly should not be screaming.

I felt like talking to the mom. But I also didn't want to approach her with an already excited dog (cause to do so would have meant stopping in front of the house where all the kids were still outside). And I never know how to handle situations where a parent is doing/not doing something that is, to me, really obvious. I always come off sounding too know-it-all or too passive.
shrug
Jodi
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