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And I never know how to handle situations where a parent is doing/not doing something that is, to me, really obvious. I always come off sounding too know-it-all or too passive.

i would have done the same thing. i would assume that most parents would resent being told how to raise their kids. and, really, it's not my business how a stranger raises her kids. i have right to ensure that my dog is safe, but beyond that, i have no right to interfere with how a stranger raises her children.

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net
All my life I've had one dream, to achieve my many goals. Homer Simpson
my dog would, at the very worst, hang back from such an encounter. that's okay with me. it's my job ... is not my job, however, to train someone else's kids for them. i'm sorry, but i draw the line there.

It's hard to do that anyways, these days, without seriously offending the parent. Especially since I don't have any kids of my own, so whadda I know about how to raise them. I only know how to raise my dog.
I could have always took diddy's approach and come out with "What causes your kids to be so loud and obnoxious?" Emotion: smile
Jodi (was that uncalled for?)
Case in point for what it is worth ..
Max is a very pretty looking large dog and gets lots of "what breed is he", "is he nice" type of things ...
... but 5 kids running up to him. I would stop them all or at least turn direction.
Kids don't understand there may be training going on or at least give me the chance to prepare him.
I wouldn't like the situation.
Parents need to teach their kids that you just don't ... if it's ok and they certainly should not be screaming.

I felt like talking to the mom. But I also didn't want to approach her with an already excited dog ... is doing/not doing something that is, to me, really obvious. I always come off sounding too know-it-all or too passive.

I might say something non-confrontational but informational about how some dogs might have a bad reaction if they didn't like kids or sudden movement so she might want to talk to them about how to approach dogs just to be on the safe side. But often I don't. Most people who can't figure out that it might be a problem to have their kids rushing strange dogs like that won't listen if a stranger tries to tell them it's a problem anyway. Just depends on how I'm feeling at the time. Am I more unable to keep my mouth shut because of what just happened and fear for those kids and the dogs who might be subjected to them or more unable to rouse myself to what will probably be futile and unappreciated efforts to educate.

Paula
Persons with names like Sierra, Sequoia, Auburn, and Rainbow can't sing the Blues no matter how many men they shoot in Memphis.
it is not my job, however, to train someone else's kids for them. i'm sorry, but i draw the line there.

It's hard to do that anyways, these days, without seriously offending the parent.

I don't see the problem in that - offending people, that is, when the first priority is my dogs. Heck, given equal balance, I'll take the dog's side most times because humans, even young'uns, are purported to have more perspicacity than canines.

On that note, I offended a human on alt.pets.dogs.aussies - perhaps some kind soul can steer him towards rpd.health or alt.med.veterinary for advice.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
It wasn't meant that way. But I'll make sure not to ask you any questions in the future so as to avoid misinterpretation.[/nq]it's hard to see how you couldn't have meant it that way, taken in context. 1) the dog is an Aussie. 2) Jodi has had her since she was a baby. i know enough about Aussies to know that a certain degree of aloofness and lack of gregariousness is not out of line with the breed standard. i would expect an Aussie even a well bred and well socialized one to be taken aback when swarmed by barbarian hoards of kids. what i would not assume is that such a reaction indicated that the dog is poorly socialized or poorly bred, which is what you did by asking why is she "so fearful and unsocialised?" that was a leading question.

the obvious answer based on the description given is, she's not. she isn't fearful and she isn't unsocialized. so, why pose your question in such a way that it assumes that the dog *is* fearful and unsocialized, when there is no reason for you to assume that she is?
plonk

what bizarre behavior. do you react that way in real life when people try to make sense of the diddy-speak? "you misunderstood me, so i'm going to stick my fingers in my ears!" doesn't strike me as a very effective approach to interpersonal communication.

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net
I don't see the problem in that - offending people, that is, when the first priority is my dogs.

i would definitely do what i had to, in the moment, to protect my dog from the kids. i'd draw the line at approaching the parents to tell them how to train up their children, though.

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net
And I never know how to handle situations where a parent is doing/not doing something that is, to me, really obvious. I always come off sounding too know-it-all or too passive.

too bad! ;-D
I would have said - "that could get a child BITTEN if it was the wrong dog - they really need to learn to ask permission and do it calmly".

Now, before Diddy jumps in again, my dogs would both be fine with screaming banshees. That doesn't mean I wouldn't have done something very similar to what you did - I would bellow out a "WHOA - slow down and have some manners - you can pet the dog(s) when YOU are calm and one at a time".

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Janet B (Email Removed) composed these thoughts and posted them
I would have said - "that could get a child BITTEN if it was the wrong dog - they really ... down and have some manners - you can pet the dog(s) when YOU are calm and one at a time".

Thank you! And element of sense here. But then, you are an instructor. Someone who has a sense of both dog stewardship, and public safety, and wants to protect dogs and dog owner rights by education, which seems to be beyond the scope of those who just want to own them. If we want to protect our dog rights, it's imperative that we do that, by both presenting a well socialized dog in public, and educating public awareness in their actions and consequences. Getting snotty about someone's behavior and then leaving does absolutely nothing for the cause.
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