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Thank you! And element of sense here. But then, you are an instructor. Someone who has a sense of both ... do that, by both presenting a well socialized dog in public, and educating public awareness in their actions and consequences.

I'm in total agreement. The public has the right to ignore my comments, and i don't have the right to tell someone how to raise their kids, BUT, I do feel a sense of responsibility to point out inappropriate acts on the part of children, in interactions with dogs. I work with too many dogs who will lose their lives, or HAVE, because these things go unsaid. I have no problem correcting other people's children (verbally, but I would physically block a child from a dog if necessary) when it comes to them intruding on *my* space. If 5 adults came screaming at me, I would do the same.
My responsibility is to make sure the dogs I take out in public, are under my control, no matter what is happening around them. That means a sit-stay while I fend off a hoard of brats if necessary (and I LIKE children and would absolutely be interacting with them to HELP them approach the dogs appropriately), or whatever I need to do.
Many years ago, my first dog was dog aggressive, so public outings in a city college neighborhood were an adventure, but we still did them (necessity for elimination among other things). I had no problem calling out to owners of off-leash dogs that my dog was NOT dog friendly, and while I would keep him with me, under my control, if their dog accosted him, things would get ugly very fast. Some of them couldn't grasp this, and "oh my dog loves other dog" would inevitably result in their dog racing up to mine, and my dog reacting with growls and snarls.

He never bit another dog - even with idiots around, I felt a responsibility to keep him in check to the best of my ability. That often included bellowing a "NOO - GO AWAYY!" to the approaching dog. And those owners were often offended. Oh well - tough patooties.
My current dogs aren't dog aggressive, but I still don't want off leash dogs racing up to them, and I tell their owners that very clearly. My dogs race with other dogs, off leash, on a regular basis, and I expect those dogs to be mannerly as well.

Janet B
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Janet B (Email Removed) composed these thoughts and posted them
Thank you! And element of sense here. But then, you ... public, and educating public awareness in their actions and consequences.

I'm in total agreement. The public has the right to ignore my comments, and i don't have the right to ... race with other dogs, off leash, on a regular basis, and I expect those dogs to be mannerly as well.[/nq]All handled very responsibly with good ambassadorship with dogs AND humans. No, you can't make people learn, but if you can at least stimulate an awareness to those who will listen, the dog world is better off for it. Those children will obviously not learn dog savvy from their clueless mother. But if there was ever an appropriate action, it would be as you suggested when you saw a hoard of kids about to mob your dog. Hey! SLOW DOWN!, I would love for you to meet my dog, but let's do it in an organized fashion, and then discuss why what they were doing was wrong, and what was right.

This is NOT raising someone else's children! And discussing this with the mom in a friendly fashion, explaining to her how the chicldren's approach could endanger a less stable dog and show her how teaching could help, would help the dog world, and the safety of her children. I'm sure the approach in a friendly fashion would have provided much better results than the mutual finger flipping that occurred.
Neither side gained in the said scenario. In your scenario, it was a win/win situation, for dog owners everywhere, the children, and the socialization of the dog. Since I don't have children, I deliberately seek out playgrounds and children. Of course before allowing my dogs to play in a childrens playground, I DO ask the parents and children if it's ok. When the children get to take turns taking the dog down the slides, helping them climb ladders, playing with jungle gyms, they seem to have a whole new purpose and dimension of fun. My puppies gain confidence, as well as learn how to build self confidence in varying situations.
Last night when the group of kids came over to play with the puppies, I had games and prizes for them, so they would have fun socializing my puppies, in a fun environment. The noise, squeals, excitement with a sense of security was EXACTLY the environment that I was seeking to introduce these puppies. It was all positive stressors. You don't HAVE to have kids in order to socialize your dogs to them. Of course, since I intend to bring my puppy into classroom environments, it's imperative that early childhood socialization begins now.

Being mobbed by kids will be a delightful experience for them and not a moment of negative stress. In fact, last night, When the children came over, Reka was so delighted to see the children come, she thought they all came to see "HER", and we had to take time out and play some scent games with her, and hide the ducky games for her to seek it out. All the kids were yelling, screaming, and encouraging her, which only spurred her incentive to show off and try harder for them.One woman said, if she had known this was what it was, she would have brought the three year old, who would have really enjoyed the party. I agreed, i wished she had. And she will for the next puppy party, which is tonight. Small peanuts to pay for the socialization of my puppies, and also teaching proper child/dog interaction to the children. It was an enjoyable evening for us all. It didn't last long, But between prizes for the children, refreshments for the adults, and for the brief time it took out of the interruption of their lives to assist my puppy training/socialization plans, they found it well worth the effort, and requested to do it again.

Exactly the reaction that I had hoped for! The only issue that was problematic over the evening, was finding enough seating in my small house for the supervising adults. The children all sat on the floor, and a few adults joined in and did the same Emotion: smile
shelly (Email Removed) said in
i would definitely do what i had to, in the moment, to protect my dog from the kids. i'd draw the line at approaching the parents to tell them how to train up their children, though.

True, that. I certainly wouldn't have approached the parents about their child training methods, either. My approach to the parents would have involved how the kids should behave around my dogs - but not how they should go about achieving that result.

One time, at an off-leash, Rocky started walking next to a kid, basically keeping him company - not looking at him, not interfering, not herding. It was a Kodak moment, IMO. The kid started kicking at Rocky. I told the parent, "Don't let your kid kick Rocky." I didn't tell her how to go about not letting her kid kick Rocky, just the result I wanted.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
True, that. I certainly wouldn't have approached the parents about their child training methods, either. My approach to the parents would have involved how the kids should behave around my dogs - but not how they should go about achieving that result.

exactly.
One time, at an off-leash, Rocky started walking next to a kid, basically keeping him company - not looking at ... Rocky." I didn't tell her how to go about not letting her kid kick Rocky, just the result I wanted.

and that, i think, is the sort of owner intervention that's appropriate, as it avoids lecturing at parents about what they "need" to do with their kids. that sort of thing is bound to get people's backs up, as the implication is that they are neglecting their parental duties. who am i to criticize their parenting skills?
it is also an immediate correction, and can be a sort of second cousin to "leading by example," in that you may have an opportunity at that moment to demonstrate proper human-to-dog behavior.
but, what i wouldn't do, is go hunt down the parent and give them an earful about their child rearing skills, which is what i objected to in some of the previous responses.

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net
shelly (Email Removed) said in
but, what i wouldn't do, is go hunt down the parent and give them an earful about their child rearing skills, which is what i objected to in some of the previous responses.

I know what you were getting at, and I wanted to clear the air in that I had no intention of previously implying that I'd deign to lecture anyone on their skin-baby rearing techniques. My child training knowledge brings to mind Dianne's current screen name.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
I know what you were getting at, and I wanted to clear the air in that I had no intention of previously implying that I'd deign to lecture anyone on their skin-baby rearing techniques.

understood! it was mainly diddy who seemed to think that was okay. i didn't get the impression that you thought it was.
My child training knowledge brings to mind Dianne's current screen name.

ha! mine isn't *so* bad, but only because i lived and breathed kids for so many years. still, that's not the same as owning your own (praise be!).

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net
ha! mine isn't *so* bad, but only because i lived and breathed kids for so many years. still, that's not the same as owning your own (praise be!).

You don't "own" kids.
They own you.
(looks at strings attached to my body, wonders how Emilie go them there when she still can't figure out her fingers)

Marcel and Moogli
http://mudbunny.blogspot.com /
You don't "own" kids. They own you.

see, this is why i don't have any.
(looks at strings attached to my body, wonders how Emilie go them there when she still can't figure out her fingers)

sucker!

shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net
Not anymore. Her first tooth is showing up. Found out when she bit me last night as I was brushing her gums.

Marcel and Moogli
http://mudbunny.blogspot.com /
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