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Over 50 lab puppies. I think that's enough of a sample to make some valid generalizations. They are (there are ***) more rambunctious andmouthy than most other breeds.

I've had interactions with over 200 puppy and young adult Labradors (over 4 years working at a shelter avg of 5 labs per week).

They are no more or less mouthy than other breeds.

Of course, you could just be receiving more mouthy Lab puppies because they are more outgoing than many puppies, and thus will be more likely to exhibit the trait in public than, say, a sheltie puppy would.

Emily Carroll
Dealing 80s Toys - Rainbow Brite - My Little Pony - More Fluttervale Labradors: www.geocities.com/diamonds in her eyes/dogs/ CPG: www.geocities.com/cyberpetgame/
4-H Club: www.geocities.com/woofsandwiggles/
Oh but I forget you have been training dogs for what 6 months..

Over a year. 10-16 classes a week. I still don't put myself in the same class as, say, Janet or ... no longer consider myself a "beginner." How long have you been training? How many classes a week do you give?

I've been training dogs for over 10 years now and still consider myself a beginner.
Teaching pet classes is nothing compared to teaching your own dog competitive work.
So how many obedience titles (not certificates CGC's don't count) have you put on your dogs? Other people's dogs? How many of your students have received qualifying scores in competition?
~Emily
The amount of classes you've "taught" are irrelevant. Your base of knowledge rests on only 40 hours training from the ... collars don't slip over a dog's head. I'd step back from the ego buffet and consider myself a beginner IIWY.

Yep. A load of crap is still crap. It's not any less crap because you've shoveled a lot of it in a short time versus a little.

Leah, your training base is non existant. You don't know anything at all about training, the PetSmart people sure haven't given you a clue because THEIR basic training is deficient as well. And you've shown an alarming tendency to completely dismiss advice from people who know far better than you do. So you haven't even learned anything, regardless of your many attention-seeking posts on this forum on training issues.

Further, you give out advice which has the potential to be harmful to dogs and people alike. Yet you completely fail to see it.

As for my own experience training since the early 80s thank you, yet I don't think I know near what YOU think YOU know after a big whopping 10 months as a paid employee of a pet store chain. I'm just waiting for the day you come crying to us because one of your students has sued you after you recommended something typically inane and the dog bit them.
I work as one of two assistants with a senior trainer (who is always present). I have been doing this for almost 4 years and I still consider myself a beginner. Each week I assist with 2 separate groups of puppy classes, 1 novice, and several groups of competitive level obedience classes. I also belong to a club that meets weekly to work on agility, obedience and FUN.. for us and the dogs.

I also personally take two classes a week of competitive level obedience classes with my own labs.
My female lab has achieved her CDX, and she is working on her UD. My male lab was a rescue and is not registered so is unable to compete in CKC events. He still is being trained and competes in the fun matches that are held in our area and has earned an unofficial CD. There is a CKC judge in our area who judges our fun matches that we hold to encourage people to train their dogs to a hight standard. They are always well attended and a lot of fun. They may be called fun matches but the people that train in our groups take them very seriously and train hard.
So what titles do your dogs hold Leah?
Bre
I've been training dogs for over 10 years now and still consider myself a beginner.

I wouldn't consider you a beginner. After ten years, you should have an impressive level of ***. However, I didn't mean to imply that I don't still have a lot to learn, and that the learning process never ceases. I'm enrolled in Ian Dunbar's four day workshop this May, and I've found an aggression specialist who promises to let me sit in on her sessions.

In any case, I am far more confident about what I do than I was last year - or even si* months ago.
So how many obedience titles (not certificates CGC's don't count) have you put on your dogs? Other people's dogs? How many of your students have received qualifying scores in competition?

Apples and oranges. I don't do competitive training. I do strictly family pet training.
Success in my field has nothing to do with titles. The golden and the lab in one of my basic classes, who si* weeks ago could not be focused and were constantly jumping, pulling, and grabbing, are already well-behaved enough to sit quietly through class. I spilled a container of dried chicken liver in front of the lab, and he responded immediately to "leave it" and let me pick it all up without going for any of it. Instead of going, "oh boy, oh boy, people and other dogs!" like they were at first, each focuses on his/her owner and performs beautifully.
That's my measurement of success. A family pet with manners and an improved relationship with his owner.
My dogs are all graduating with basic skills (well, mostly all - there are still those owners who don't work with them, but not as many as there used to be), and my drop-out rate has dropped to zero.
And that's how I can measure my own improvement as a trainer.

I have students following me from the other location, which is closer to where they live. A couple of weeks ago, a student showed up who lives over an hour away, saying she had been searching for a "good trainer" and was referred to me. My current students are more frequently signing up for further classes with me. Employees from other PetsMarts are bringing their dogs to me instead of going to the trainers at their own locations.
I'm not trying to blow my own horn - however, I have good reason to believe that my skills as a trainer are continually improving, and can say with confidence that as a family pet trainer, I know what I'm doing.

I don't know jack about competitive training. If my students are interested in competition, I refer them out.
PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
Of course, you could just be receiving more mouthy Lab puppies because they are more outgoing than many puppies, and thus will be more likely to exhibit the trait in public than, say, a sheltie puppy would.

Now that could be true.
PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
I think labs are more oral than some other breeds. As they were bred to be.

BethF, Anchorage, AK
It's YOUR God.
They are YOUR rules.
YOU burn in hell.
Teaching your own dog competitive work is nothing like teaching other people to handle their problem dogs, no.
At the same time our clubs most accomplished OTHC handler stopped me after observing my beginner class for a couple of weeks. She is a charter member of the club and has been competing in obedience for about
20 years. She has been teaching formal obedience classes for the last
15. She told me how incredibly proud she was at how I had learned tohandle problem dogs, because she wouldn't have a clue how what to do with them (there was one particular dog in class that she saw on the first week and then the fourth week, which is what made her comment) even with all her years of experience.
The skills are different, but not necessarily "more advanced" or "less advanced", IMO. For example, I suspect our own Melanie is really skilled at reading dog body language, because of the necessity with her dog Solo. I think I would much prefer to have Melanie next to me the first night of my next beginner class session than I would that OTCH person in my club.
The people who I am really impressed with are the ones who compete at high levels with damaged rescue dogs. Thats talent.

BethF, Anchorage, AK
It's YOUR God.
They are YOUR rules.
YOU burn in hell.